CHAMPS XVII

Discussion in 'The Mainboard' started by Scott Van Pelt, Mar 9, 2019.

  1. Joey Freshwater

    Joey Freshwater Slingin The Pipe Since 75
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    Alabama Crimson TideMiami Heat

  2. LeonardWashington

    LeonardWashington every year gon be our year
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    Alabama Crimson TideBoston CelticsMiami Dolphins

    Strange that we are speculating that we might be running off Smith and/or Fleming because they wouldn't fit our style then offer a 7'2" 260 pound C...

    If Fleming or Smith leaves I think it's more because Oats simply thinks they suck rather than them not being a fit
     
  3. LeonardWashington

    LeonardWashington every year gon be our year
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    Alabama Crimson TideBoston CelticsMiami Dolphins

    I have very mixed feelings on Fleming but I kinda like Galen. He's not a guy you ideally want playing a TON but he does bring some size, strength, and more importantly toughness to the team. While not a great player, he's one of the few guys on the team that you never had to question his effort. Based on his early comments I'd think Oats would like a guy like that on the roster... he could help even in an off the bench/matchups role
     
    #2553 LeonardWashington, Apr 11, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2019
  4. jplaYa

    jplaYa CHAMPZY/SMOLTZY/CHELSEA
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    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesAtlanta FalconsChelseaAtlanta United


    TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Standing atop a temporary stage on the floor of Alabama’s Coleman Coliseum, somewhere between 800 and 1,000 high school football coaches looking back at him from the stands, Matt Patricia is 10 minutes into a 45-minute talk when he punches what is essentially his thesis statement for the day and, in many ways, for his entire NFL coaching career.

    “I’m on a crusade,” he says, “to eliminate bad football.”

    Patricia’s visit to the Nick Saban-hosted “Clinic of Champions” began on Friday morning at Detroit Metro Airport, where he and his chief of staff, Kevin Anderson, boarded a private jet provided by a Crimson Tide booster. The Lions invited me to fill an unclaimed seat so I could be in attendance for Patricia’s session.

    Saban doesn’t just hand out these featured slots to anyone with a whistle. The 2018 season was a clear letdown for the Lions (and their fans), but it did little to ding Patricia’s status among his fellow coaches. He’s still viewed as a premier football mind, especially when it comes to defense. Patricia also has given a version of this lecture several times in the past. His players in Detroit hear it constantly, albeit delivered in less-formal fashion.

    Patricia’s familiarity with the material — how ingrained it is into his day-to-day NFL life — is obvious from the moment he begins. In gray slacks, a blue, short-sleeve shirt and with his trademark pencil tucked behind his right ear, Patricia addresses the group with sort of a business-casual demeanor. He’s firm when he wants to drive home an idea, but he’s talking to the coaches, not at them. Presumably, those in attendance are experienced and knowledgeable in their own right, and he treats them as such.

    As Patricia continues at the clinic, the video board behind him, lowered at midcourt to a height of maybe 30 feet, rolls play after play pulled from various NFL games. All are meant to emphasize key points within Patricia’s presentation, entitled “Smart, Tough, Fundamentally Sound Football.” Toward the end of his time, he transitions into a discussion of Super Bowl LI, which featured the Patriots’ historic comeback against the Falcons.

    Arguably the most critical momentum shift in that classic came with about 8:30 left in the fourth quarter, the Patriots down 16, when Dont’a Hightower forced a Matt Ryan fumble and kick-started New England’s rally in earnest. For Patricia, though, the snap before that one was just as important, if not more so.

    “This is one of the biggest plays in the Super Bowl and no one talks about it,” he says, as he cues up a second-and-2 for Atlanta. It was a downhill toss to Tevin Coleman, and the Patriots — led by Trey Flowers, Patricia’s new defensive toy in Detroit — stuffed it. Coleman stayed down with an injury. Seeing that, ahead of the ensuing third down, Bill Belichick clicked into Matt Patricia’s headset and told him, “You got it. It’s wide open.”

    “Coleman is the third-down back,” Patricia explains to the Alabama audience, as he sets up video of Hightower’s strip sack. “He’s the blitz-pickup back. He’s the guy that’s been practicing all week for third-down protections and third-down pressures. Now it’s third-and-2. I call (Hightower), click on (his headset), ‘Hey High, we gotta score. Get the ball. Walk out wide and do it.’

    “New back in the game, he hasn’t practiced this scenario. High walks out wide, the back doesn’t even see him. Fundamentals. Attack the arm, fumble recovery.”

    For Patricia, success in football is measured in the details. Great scheme? Creative play calling? You need ’em, sure, but they don’t cover you if your players fail at the basics. He tried to make that argument time and again during his news conferences last season, but the way things played out for the Lions made it easy to ignore those observations. It didn’t change the way he will approach his job this year, though.

    He wants his team to be smart. Play tough. Be fundamentally sound.

    “More games in the NFL are lost than won,” Patricia says. “That is true. How are they lost? The No. 1 thing is bad football.”

    DETROIT — Our plane is late.

    Patricia isn’t on the schedule at the coaches’ clinic until 1:15 p.m. local time (2:15 p.m. ET) and it’s only approaching 11 a.m. ET now, so there’s a bit of a buffer — the flight from Detroit to the airport just outside Alabama’s campus runs around one hour, 35 minutes. But this is already a rather quick in-and-out, so tightening the window further would be problematic.

    The aircraft, an Embraer Phenom 300, first had to stop in Lansing to pick up the other passengers for the trip down to Tuscaloosa: Michigan State head coach Mark Dantonio and four of his assistants (offensive coordinator Brad Salem, wide receivers coach Don Treadwell, quarterbacks coach Dave Warner and assistant head coach Mike Tressel).

    Dantonio will be Friday’s second speaker, immediately following Patricia, then the Spartans’ staff will attend Alabama’s 3:30 p.m. practice before returning home. They’ll need yet another private plane for that flight; Detroit’s contingent will be back in the air, aboard the Phenom 300, by the time practice begins. As we wait on it now, Patricia starts observing details of the other private aircraft parked outside, including the propeller plane near the exit. Call it the aeronautical engineering background peeking through.

    Once our plane does land and taxis to a visible distance, Patricia — perhaps in an attempt to calm the nerves of the admittedly nervous journalist flying with him — explains why the Phenom 300’s design makes it relatively safe. Something about the height of the tail and the way the engines are positioned. I was too jittery to really soak it all in.

    Patricia does not agree to as many of these speaking opportunities as he once did, because, quite simply, he doesn’t have time. Had the request to appear at the 2019 Clinic of Champions not come from Saban himself, Patricia likely would not have obliged. But this is a business of relationships and Patricia has a longstanding one with Saban, the roots of which actually precede Patricia’s own coaching career — Saban served as Bill Belichick’s defensive coordinator in Cleveland from 1991-94.

    How important is it to maintain those connections? Well, take the 2018 draft, for example. As Round 4 unfolded, the Lions saw an opportunity to climb up the board for Alabama defensive lineman Da’Shawn Hand. Before pulling the trigger, though, they wanted confirmation of Hand’s potential as a player and of how reliable he’d be as a professional. They dialed up Saban. He gave the all-clear. Detroit then traded its 2019 third-round pick to New England and selected Hand with pick No. 114 overall. The Crimson Tide product went on to be an obvious bright spot during a disappointing 2018.

    Patricia wouldn’t go that route with every coach, but he and Bob Quinn trust Saban, so they take whatever opportunity they can to maintain the lines of communication. If that means a seven-hour jaunt down to Alabama three weeks before the draft, so be it.

    Aboard, Patricia and Dantonio sit next to each other, split by a narrow aisle, facing forward. Across from that, seated in the opposite direction, are Warner and Treadwell. As the seats are informally arranged by order of importance, mine is tucked way in the back, hidden so well that, at first, I don’t even see it and think we’re overbooked. It’s there, though, behind a half-wall, opposite a small set of cabinets and two coolers full of refreshments. The curvature of the aircraft makes it so I have to hunch over the entire time.

    One of Michigan State’s coaches asks Patricia about the NFL’s stilted offseason schedule, so he explains the difference between Phase I, II and III of his team’s workouts. Then we’re off. In planning out this trip with the Lions, I’d agreed to keep the actual flight down to Tuscaloosa off the record. It’s a good thing in hindsight, because I can’t hear anything.

    TUSCALOOSA — Any trip down South, even a quick one, isn’t complete without grabbing some food. So as he drives us from the airport to Alabama’s football facility, J.T. Hill, a recruiting specialist whose dad played fullback for Bear Bryant, recommends a local barbecue joint, Archibald’s. He dials up Saban’s director of football operations, Ellis Ponder, who’s running point for the clinic. “Hey Ellis, you think we could help hook these guys up?”

    Alabama’s Mal M. Moore Athletic Facility is, in a word, remarkable. On the second floor at the north end, where the football offices are housed, visitors are greeted by flooring cut in the design of college football’s playoff trophy. Above, there’s a set of dangling lights, and at the bottom of each one is the picture of a different Alabama championship ring. If you’d prefer a better view of those rings, there’s a wall displaying them, with a sliding magnifying glass so you can inspect each individual diamond.

    Here, Patricia and Anderson break off to meet with Saban. Hill leads me over to the Coleman Coliseum, Alabama’s basketball arena, to wait for Patricia’s presentation. Behind Patricia and Dantonio on Friday’s schedule is inspirational speaker Dr. Kevin Elko, the ‘Bama practice, a crawfish boil, then talks by Saban and new Browns head coach Freddie Kitchens. Kitchens, of course, will fly into town via private jet.

    Patricia’s conversation with Saban runs a little long, something the high school coaches might mind more if they weren’t busy dining on a barbecue buffet. When he begins, around 1:20 p.m. local time, Patricia first takes a moment to thank all the coaches at the event. “Football is the greatest sport on the planet, we’re all blessed to be a part of it,” he says, “and (I) just really appreciate you guys at the ground floor grinding through with these kids and making a difference in their lives. It’s so impactful and we can’t forget that.”

    What he’ll cover over the next 45 minutes is “about what we teach our guys, how we want to play the game.” The Lions are “in the middle of a transformation, of building a program” but, Patricia insists, “definitely were able to lay a foundation” over the course of last season.

    It’s a three-pronged focus:

    1. Smart: “Knowing what to do so we can play aggressive, slowing the game down to play fast and physical. You either don’t know or you don’t care, that’s why you made the mental mistake. Got to have mental toughness all the way through if that’s what we’re trying to do.”

    2. Tough: “We talk about toughness all the time. I think toughness is something in our sport that is thrown out there, you know, ‘He’s a tough kid.’ But we want to have a tough team. What does that mean? It doesn’t mean that we’re going to be the hardest-hitting team, we want to be that anyways. Doesn’t mean that we’re going to be the most physically gifted looking team. We quantify (toughness) and evaluate it with three different concepts: Can you run the ball? Can you stop the run? And can you cover kicks? That’s something we really learned when I was in New England in 2016 — we played Atlanta in the Super Bowl, it was solidified. Do those three things, you can control the game. Control the game, the score doesn’t matter, because you will win. You will have that opportunity to come back.”

    3. Fundamentally sound:“Fundamentals, you’ve got to be committed to them. Every single day, consistently improve your fundamentals throughout the year. Do it in practice and make it a habit for the game. It’s our only chance to improve, practice. This sport is different than every other sport. Baseball, basketball, they play games to get better. We need to practice to get better, that’s the biggest thing for us. … Practice should be the hardest thing we do. We always simulate practice to be like the games so the games are easier. We want to push ourselves in practice to be better. Don’t expect somebody to do it for you. Commit yourself to play at a high level, it will raise the level of play of all your teammates.”

    Many of the ideas Patricia covers — alignment, pad level, throwing and catching the football — sound simple enough. The game film he shows the coaches are meant to reel in that line of thinking. Nothing can be taken for granted, Patricia stresses, when it comes to those critical moments that a team’s season is on the line.

    The first clip is from Kansas City’s 31-13, divisional-round win over Indianapolis in January. A touchdown run by Damien Williams that happened because Williams made safety Clayton Geathers whiff around the 5-yard line. “Just a missed tackle right there,” Patricia says, pausing the tape. “Just a fundamental tackle. He’s got him and just hacks. Results in a touchdown. Highest level, biggest game of the year, bad football.”

    There’s a botched snap from the Ravens’ playoff loss to the Chargers, a shanked field goal from that same Chiefs-Colts game by Adam Vinatieri — “one of the greatest kickers of all time, great friend of mine,” Patricia adds. A dropped pass by Alshon Jeffery that turned into an interception. An unnecessary roughness penalty on Chicago’s Adrian Amos that extended a Philadelphia drive.

    Also included is the brutal offside committed by Dee Ford in the AFC championship game, a mistake that erased a potential title-clinching interception and gave the Patriots new life, en route to an overtime win. “Alignment,” Patricia says, the disgust noticeable in his voice. “That’s one of the things I’m teaching my 8-year-old son. Bad football. Causes you to lose. Can’t happen. Gotta eliminate it.”

    Anytime Patricia speaks at a clinic, he updates the examples he uses so they’re as current as possible. Naturally, then, his appearance here highlights several moments from the 2018 Lions’ season. Two of the team’s young stars, running back Kerryon Johnson and receiver Kenny Golladay, are prominently featured.

    In fact, Patricia shows three of Johnson’s runs from the Lions’ win over the Patriots, plus a fourth from that game by LeGarrette Blount. With each, he reiterates his desire to finish off victories in the trenches. “We can’t give them the ball back,” he says. “We’ve got to be able to block, be able to get to our holes and make people miss. You’ve got to run the ball and chew the clock. You’ve got to control the game.”

    Golladay’s clips — a leaping grab followed by a wicked stiff arm vs. Green Bay and a touchdown vs. Carolina — shift the conversation in a slightly different direction. The crowd has an audible reaction to the latter play, a diving, acrobatic catch by Golladay with a defender draped all over him. Patricia lets them soak it in for a second, then shifts right back into coach mode.

    “Great route?” Patricia asks of the TD reception. “No. Covered? Yeah. Concentration? Absolutely. Catching the football. The concentration of catching the football. … Good football, good fundamentals. That’ll help you win.”

    Moments earlier, he’d shown a terrific catch by Rams receiver Brandin Cooks, from a game against the Saints. Patricia and Cooks overlapped in New England in 2017, and the Lions’ coach recalls what it was like watching Cooks in practice. Cooks “catches three balls on every play, whether it’s thrown to him or not” — a straightforward throw to his numbers, an over-the-shoulder catch like the one we just saw him make against the Saints, and then an even more difficult attempt. “He’s made that catch 1,000 times in practice,” Patricia says, pointing up to the video board. “Now, he may only have gotten it thrown to him twice (in a game), but he’s made it 1,000 times because he practices it every single day.”

    Patricia closes his 45-minute block by reiterating to the coaches that if they work the fundamentals with their teams, they’ll be better prepared than their opponents on game days. “Teach it, coach it,” he tells them, “and you’ll be amazed” at the payoff. He thanks the crowd, then walks off to a round of applause as Ponder announces Dantonio.

    When the Lions hired Patricia, just about everyone who had crossed paths with the Patriots’ former defensive coordinator raved about his personality. “He’s a guy you want to be around. That’s it,” Amherst athletic director Don Faulstick told The Athletic; Faulstick was Amherst’s offensive coordinator when Patricia accepted a job with the Mammoths.

    We saw glimpses of that outgoing approach during Patricia’s first year with the Lions, but he has been noticeably looser so far this offseason. And he is in his element at Alabama.

    On his way off the stage, a couple of autograph-seekers flag him down, so he stops to sign without hesitation. Patricia then runs into one of Flowers’ high school coaches from Huntsville, with whom he poses for a picture and a conversation. He has made who knows how many stops at Alabama over the years, scouting prospect after prospect from the seemingly endless well of them they have down here, and there are a lot of familiar faces who want to say hi before Patricia bolts for Detroit.

    There isn’t a hard out on the return trip to DTW, so Patricia and Anderson take a few extra moments to walk through the rest of Alabama’s immaculate facility. Because the Lions are considering renovations to their Allen Park home, Anderson snaps an occasional photo as they go — the sprawling workout room overlooking the practice field, the murals, the barber shop that’s tucked away inside a monstrous rec room.

    Granted, Alabama has more space to work with and, if we’re being honest, more money to toss around on extravagances.

    “What’d you think of that place?” Patricia asks me later.

    “It’s insane,” I tell him.

    “Arms race,” he replies.

    When the tour works its way back to the starting point, Hill walks us out to the parking lot. Two cars are waiting. The first is our ride back to the airport, which Hill will drive. Before getting in, he walks over to the second, opens the back door and grabs three overflowing bags.

    Barbecue from Archibald’s.

    SOMEWHERE OVER KENTUCKY OR OHIO — With Michigan State’s coaches sticking around Tuscaloosa a bit longer, I’m able to upgrade my seat on the flight home. Free from the sensory deprivation chamber at the back, I sit opposite Anderson in the middle of the plane, Patricia to Anderson’s left. After we’ve been cruising along for awhile, Patricia asks if I have any questions about his presentation.

    I point out that most of the Lions’ clips he chose came from the New England game last season, his first victory as a head coach. Was that game a glimpse at the finished product Patricia envisions in Detroit, should he pull everything together the way he wants?

    “I put it in there, obviously, because they won the Super Bowl, you always want to compare yourself to the best teams in the league,” he says. “The Miami game, that’s what it should look like. The Green Bay games, both of them, that’s what it should look like. The Patriots game, that’s what it should look like.

    “One of the things I watched painfully in the two championship games — kind of watched them, it’s hard for me to sit and watch — one thing I know about those games, the end of those games, the anxiety, the emotional roller coaster and the mental stress that you go through in those situations … you have to have a mentally tough team. You have to be smart, you have to recognize situational football at a high level, because otherwise you line up offsides. You hit a receiver in the head, even if it isn’t called. You make mistakes. That’s the mental part of it that you have to have.”

    Unfortunately for the Lions, there are no shortcuts if they’re going to craft this thing the way Patricia believes it has to be built. Those four games — the wins over Miami, Green Bay (twice) and New England — made up a quarter of the schedule last season. In the rest of their outings, Detroit was 2-10.

    How Patricia propels the franchise from point A to point B, where those performances aren’t blips on the radar but an expected week-in and week-out occurrence (like they are with New England), is his challenge. Of more pressing concern to the fan base and ownership is how he accomplishes that with as little delay as possible. This league demands immediate results.

    If the Lions scuffle for the next two or three years but then contend for a decade, would the wait be worth it? If it takes longer, would Patricia be granted leniency to finish the job he’s started?

    “It’s not as easy these days to say ‘do this just because,'” Patricia says. “They (the players) ask why. You try to show them the why, but for a lot of them, unless they experience the why, it doesn’t really resonate. That can really hurt you in the win-loss department. … The question is: How long does it take? No one knows. No one knows how long it takes to build it substantially. I know how far away we are compared to other teams — coaching, experience, talent, all the rest of it. We’re doing the best we can, developing our players, coaching our coaches better. We’re gonna teach better this year, we’re going to be able to get to smarter football better this year. They’ll understand it better the second year. And then once they understand it, they’re thinking along the lines of how we’re teaching it, then you’re really going.”

    Patricia loves this game. There’s no doubting that, even among those who would criticize his performance thus far with the Lions. We’re soaring 36,000 feet over the Midwest on a Friday afternoon, weeks from the draft, months from Detroit’s first game, and he’s in full-on head coach mode. Asked about the NFL’s limit on in-season padded practices — the CBA cuts each team off at 14 — Patricia shifts into a demonstration of the difference between blocking an opponent who is and who is not wearing pads. The hands are in a different spot, the arms lock at a different angle.

    The basics. “They’ve got to understand that first,” Patricia says,” because it impacts the game so much more than this defensive call, that offensive scheme. … You spend all the time on the scheme, you’re ignoring the players. You’ve got to spend time on the players because this game may change every day.”

    If it seems like the Lions gravitate toward specific programs, like Alabama’s, or to specific conferences, like the SEC, that’s not a coincidence. When they’re able to find players who show an understanding of those requisite fundamentals and techniques before they get to Detroit, it speeds up the process. Same idea when it comes to signing, say, Flowers or Danny Amendola. Patricia doesn’t have to start from scratch if a player has proven he’s ready for more advanced teaching.

    Our flight lands at Detroit Metro around 6 p.m. Patricia and Anderson will head from there directly back to the team facility, and Patricia tells Anderson that he’ll be in extra early Saturday morning to knock out whatever work he missed during the trip.

    The process never stops.

    “It takes awhile,” Patricia says. “I don’t think anyone wants to wait — you gotta win now — but the trick is to figure out how to win and do all that at the same time. That’s the key.”
     
    ChopRoll42, Hawks11, Menelaus and 3 others like this.
  5. southlick

    southlick Better Than You
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    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesDallas CowboysBirmingham Iron

    JUCO SF eyeing Alabama with addition of Oats

    With news that Alabama guard Diante Wood has entered the transfer portal, new Crimson Tide basketball coach Nate Oats looks to be working with two remaining scholarships to fill out his 2019 class as it stands.

    Oats and his new-look staff have retained the entirety of UA’s 2019 early signing class that includes four-star forward Juwan Gary and four-star guards Jaylen Forbes and Jaden Shackelford, and landed a commitment from three-star center Raymond Hawkins just a few days on the job.

    Another addition could be coming if all goes according to plan for James Rojas.



    The 2019 Hutchinson C.C. (Kan.) small forward, a Buffalo signee under Oats, is working to get released from his Letter of Intent to the Bulls, and hopes to join the Alabama program.

    “Yeah,” Rojas said when asked if he intends to go to Alabama once released.

    The New York native wants to play for Oats, a coach he’s long admired.

    “He just loves the game,” Rojas said. “He’s there for all the players. He just wants the best for everybody. He just wants to win; he has the mindset to win. I just love the way he coaches.”

    New UA assistant Bryan Hodgson recruited Rojas to Buffalo.

    “I’ve known him forever,” Rojas said. “He just always has my back and wants the best for me, always tries to put me in the best position.”

    Asked if there are any other teams he would be interested in once free to move forward with his recruiting process …

    “It’s just Bama right now,” Rojas said.

    3COMMENTS
    Rojas, an NJCAA First Team All-American, has two years of eligibility left.

    The 6-foot-8 forward averaged 18.8 points and 5.8 rebounds per game last season. Rojas also shot 33.3% from 3-point range and 77 % from the free-throw line.
     
  6. jplaYa

    jplaYa CHAMPZY/SMOLTZY/CHELSEA
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    It’s pretty freaking awesome seeing kids do everything they can to follow CNO
     
  7. Crepeswithasmile

    Crepeswithasmile Well-Known Member
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    Alabama Crimson TideLos Angeles LakersDallas Cowboys



    :laugh: Ronnie looks like he's been selling weed using the street name Mr. Nice Guy
     
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  8. DriveByBBQ

    DriveByBBQ Well-Known Member
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    Alabama Crimson Tide

    Trendon is playing in Memphis tonight...Two days ago I over heard some guy at the airport ask two basketball players, (one of them said he plays for Mnt. Brook) where they thought Trendon was going to go. Only one of them answered and predicted Memphis. Pretty sure it was his Mnt. Brook teammate that answered.
     
  9. jplaYa

    jplaYa CHAMPZY/SMOLTZY/CHELSEA
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    Last I checked a Penny is coin.
     
    HtownTide likes this.
  10. hightide

    hightide Curmudgeon
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    Last fall at a fund raiser for the Athletic Dept (and after a few cocktails) five of us got together and decided to bid on "The Feast on the Fifty". Well, tonight the five couples meet in the locker room for pre-dinner cocktails and then go out to our table on the fifty in Bryant-Denny. It's been long enough that I've forgotten how much it cost so I can just enjoy the evening.
     
  11. gus_chiggins

    gus_chiggins AND STAY OUT OF THE WOOLWORTH
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesTiger Woods

    This is some high class bammer shit, right here
     
  12. DoubleDutchBus

    DoubleDutchBus Well-Known Member
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    You can’t hide money.
     
  13. i am a bammer

    i am a bammer Ben Eblen>Jamychal Green
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    Alabama Crimson Tide

    This is what I pay for!!!
     
  14. Clown Baby

    Clown Baby I don’t cry. I Saab.

    If I were Trendon, I wouldn’t tell my white boy teammates shit
     
    i am a bammer and Tiffin like this.
  15. southlick

    southlick Better Than You
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    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesDallas CowboysBirmingham Iron

    TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -- Alabama hit the practice field Thursday for its 14th of 15 spring practices and final tune-up before Saturday’s A-Day Game. The Crimson Tide players practiced in jerseys and shorts and outdoors on the Thomas-Drew Practice Fields on a cloudy, 83-degree afternoon.

    Here are several observations from the media viewing portion of Thursday’s practice:

    -- Offensive tackle Jedrick Wills (ankle) was once again not at practice. The offensive linemen worked in pairs when I was watching, and Matt Womack was the first player up in the line for right tackles. Behind him was Tommy Brown and Amari Kight. Opposite Womack’s line was a line for left guards consisting of Emil Ekiyor, Evan Neal, Kendall Randolph and Tanner Bowles.

    -- As for the left tackles, it was a much shorter line made up of only Alex Leatherwood and Scott Lashley. They were on isolated blocks opposite the right guards and centers which was led by Chris Owens with Deonte Brown, Hunter Brannon, Pierce Quick and Darrian Dalcourt behind him.

    -- Outside linebackers Terrell Lewis (knee) and Ben Davis (shin splints) were in black no-contact jerseys. I didn’t see Lewis, Davis or Anfernee Jennings do anything when I was watching the edge rushers. The only four scholarship outside ‘backers that worked with position coach Sal Sunseri -- who is … passionate -- were Christopher Allen, Eyabi Anoma, Jarez Parks and Kevin Harris.

    -- Rounding out the injury front, defensive back Shyheim Carter (sports hernia) was the only other non-quarterback wearing a black jersey. But the senior participated in every drill, as usual.

    -- Tight end Major Tennison was back on the field but not doing much. All of the tight ends were present -- Miller Forristall, Giles Amos, Cameron Latu, Kedrick James and Michael Parker.

    -- True freshman DJ Dale was with the first group of defensive linemen through drills along with Raekwon Davis and LaBryan Ray. The second and third groups consisted of four players with the twos featuring Christian Barmore, Tevita Musika, Phidarian Mathis and Stephon Wynn and freshmen Antonio Alfano and Justin Eboigbe making up the third group with walk-ons.

    -- Dylan Moses led the inside linebackers through drills with Joshua McMillon right behind him. Markail Benton, Shane Lee, Jaylen Moody and Ale Kaho rounded out the inside ‘backer line.

    -- Former Alabama linebacker Reggie Ragland was watching his old position group Thursday.

    *** What’s next: Alabama head coach Nick Saban will hold a press conference following practice at roughly 6 p.m. CT. The A-Day Game will kick off Saturday at 1 p.m. (ESPN2).
     
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  16. William

    William You can’t fire me. I don’t work in this van.
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  17. gus_chiggins

    gus_chiggins AND STAY OUT OF THE WOOLWORTH
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesTiger Woods

    Seeds and stems, probably. Mandatory jail time
     
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  18. William

    William You can’t fire me. I don’t work in this van.
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    How many former players have come back to visit Tuscaloosa and gotten arrested? Seems like it happens a lot but I cant find any statistics.
     
    Tiffin likes this.
  19. southlick

    southlick Better Than You
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    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesDallas CowboysBirmingham Iron

    It’s truly 50/50 right now. If I had a gun to my head right now I’d say Memphis because of the lack of a relationship with Oats. All recruits for Alabama get an additional official visit due to having a new coach so that is why all the signees are visiting Saturday. If Watford visits, then that may tell you all you need to know. If he doesn’t, it should also tell you. His relationship with Penny and Miller will be tough to beat

    12
    Harper41, Today at 12:07 PM
     
  20. DriveByBBQ

    DriveByBBQ Well-Known Member
    Donor
    Alabama Crimson Tide

    Weren’t white, “shorter” guy from Mnt. Brook was at least 6’6. Taller guy (who said he was from Oregon) had several inches on the other guy. Sporting Nike tournament travel gear etc...Obvious to the point that the good ole boy who was chatting them up opened with “Are y’all basketball players?”

    Edit: but your point stands
     
  21. LeonardWashington

    LeonardWashington every year gon be our year
    Donor
    Alabama Crimson TideBoston CelticsMiami Dolphins

    Harper? Bama lock then put it on the board
     
  22. DoubleDutchBus

    DoubleDutchBus Well-Known Member
    Donor TMB OG

    Still rolling with what I posted.
     
  23. mustang66

    mustang66 Well-Known Member
    Alabama Crimson TideTennessee TitansNashville Predators

    True Bama Man
     
  24. i am a bammer

    i am a bammer Ben Eblen>Jamychal Green
    TMB OG
    Alabama Crimson Tide

    We are unstoppable with CNO and Watford will be wearing crimson
     
  25. Joey Freshwater

    Joey Freshwater Slingin The Pipe Since 75
    Donor
    Alabama Crimson TideMiami Heat

    Looks like James Rojas some big time Juco PF that's committed to Buffalo wants out and wants to come to Alabama. That same Harper guy said he talked to Rojas on the phone and he said he hasn't been released yet but when he has he's coming to Alabama. I don't know really what that means numbers wise I would imagine we would find a way to make it work if we could get all three (Bolden, Watford, Rojas). We've got spots for 2 of them right now.
     
    Tiffin likes this.
  26. southlick

    southlick Better Than You
    Donor TMB OG
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesDallas CowboysBirmingham Iron

  27. Joey Freshwater

    Joey Freshwater Slingin The Pipe Since 75
    Donor
    Alabama Crimson TideMiami Heat

    :loldog:

    I too would like to explore my options in the NBA.
     
  28. Deuce

    Deuce Well-Known Member
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesTiger WoodsBirmingham Iron

    Can’t wait for

     
    Crepeswithasmile likes this.
  29. Crepeswithasmile

    Crepeswithasmile Well-Known Member
    Donor
    Alabama Crimson TideLos Angeles LakersDallas Cowboys

    :clap: I was just about to post that
     
    Deuce likes this.
  30. southlick

    southlick Better Than You
    Donor TMB OG
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesDallas CowboysBirmingham Iron

  31. Tiffin

    Tiffin Florida is a penis.
    Donor
    Alabama Crimson TideLos Angeles LakersNew Orleans SaintsWWE

    Goddamnit I hated hearing that in January and I hate hearing it now. We should not have to lose a game to get our heads in it.
     
  32. Juicy Locke

    Juicy Locke Proud Papa
    Donor TMB OG
    Alabama Crimson Tide

    I’ve said it before, I think it’s an issue.
     
  33. southlick

    southlick Better Than You
    Donor TMB OG
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesDallas CowboysBirmingham Iron

    Full quotes

    Alabama star quarterback Tua Tagovailoa brought an honest, realistic look to the failure to capture a National Championship last season. Tagovailoa, during a national media appearance to promote the Alabama spring game, said the problems started long before they took the field against Clemson.

    “It was an accumulation of things that we weren’t doing right that we were just getting away with,” Tagovailoa said Friday afternoon during an appearance on The Paul Finebaum Show. “It ended up catching up to us in the National Championship. An example I could use is guys not doing things the right way, our team not doing things the right way as far as the little things. …

    “Everything was good because we were winning. For me, it would have been best if we would have lost at least one game, maybe toward the second half of the season so we all come to a realization that the little things do matter. Coach (Nick) Saban always talks about the Alabama factor around here. We feel as if we’re entitled to things that we don’t have to work as hard for. That’s just not true. We took that for granted because we were winning too much. We didn’t do things the right way after that. It ended up catching up to us.”

    Tagovailoa returned to the practice fields with a passion this spring in search of redemption for the way last season ended. He said accountability needs to be stronger on both sides of the ball in order to return to the College Football Playoff.

    Finebaum also asked Tagovailoa, who has been full go in spring, about his health compared to the end of last season.

    “Yes, I am fully recovered,” Tagovailoa said. “I am satisfied with where I am in terms of how I’m feeling healthwise. As far as things I can work on, there’s still things that I can work on. There’s still things that need to be kind of revamped. With coach (Steve) Sarkisian and his staff here, they’re doing a tremendous job helping us.”
     
  34. Drown ‘Em

    Drown ‘Em Well-Known Member
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta Braves

    Now keep that crazy lady friend away.
     
  35. Drown ‘Em

    Drown ‘Em Well-Known Member
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta Braves

    Double post.
     
    gus_chiggins likes this.
  36. Jake Barnes

    Jake Barnes LOOK AT THAT LASER!!!
    Donor
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesAtlanta Falcons

    I agree that I’d rather we not need a loss to get our heads right, but kids will be kids.
     
  37. jplaYa

    jplaYa CHAMPZY/SMOLTZY/CHELSEA
    Donor TMB OG
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesAtlanta FalconsChelseaAtlanta United

  38. DoubleDutchBus

    DoubleDutchBus Well-Known Member
    Donor TMB OG

    Cause he’s going to Bama.
     
  39. Z

    Z Well-Known Member
    Alabama Crimson TideBoston Red Sox

    No set amount, just is an amount which is not considered for personal use. Can be large amount which makes them think selling or small amount if they find it in individually wrapped baggies or something similar.
     
    William likes this.
  40. Tommy Callahan

    Tommy Callahan Well-Known Member
    TMB OG
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta Braves

    Breaking news: Charlie Conway had beers in my backyard he is alive and with a younger girl than ever
     
  41. Owsley

    Owsley My friends call me Bear
    Donor TMB OG
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesTottenhamAtlanta United

    Chaz gonna Chaz
     
  42. The Blackfish

    The Blackfish The Fish in Black
    Staff Donor TMB OG
    Alabama Crimson TideIndianapolis Colts

    He gets older, they stay the same age
     
    Charlie Conway likes this.
  43. Joey Freshwater

    Joey Freshwater Slingin The Pipe Since 75
    Donor
    Alabama Crimson TideMiami Heat

    :deerstandnotkneel:
     
  44. southlick

    southlick Better Than You
    Donor TMB OG
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesDallas CowboysBirmingham Iron

  45. Scott Van Pelt

    Scott Van Pelt President of the Hate Avery Johnson Fan Club
    Alabama Crimson TideOklahoma City ThunderChicago BlackhawksLiverpool

    What’s everybody most interested in seeing today?

    For me:

    How does the MLB opposite Moses play?
    OL and DL
    Tualia
    want to see if the metchie hype is real
    Kicking (I’m a masochist)