CoronaVirus Disease (COVID-19) Thread : Here Come the Clock Truthers

Discussion in 'The Mainboard' started by shaolin5, Jan 20, 2020.

  1. CaneKnight

    CaneKnight FSU Private Board's Fav Poster
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    If you decide not to get the vaccine, or wear masks you should be made to die alone in your home and refused medical treatment.
     
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  2. BamaNug

    BamaNug The journey itself is the point
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    This is exactly how I feel. My scientific training ended with Freshman biology, but no idea about doing J&J and then Moderna/Pfizer.

    pperc thoughts on J&J recipients getting a second shot of Moderna/Pfizer?
     
  3. pperc

    pperc Well-Known Member
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    I think that if there is a need, it won’t be announced by the NYT. I think that article is based on a non-peer reviewed paper that looks at nAbs and not outcomes. So everyone should just relax.
     
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  4. Pile Driving Miss Daisy

    Pile Driving Miss Daisy It angries up the blood
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    I think Spliff posted the NYT article interviewing a bunch of people in Missouri who didn't get vaccinated and are all hospitalized with COVID. Each of the three said they STILL wouldn't get vaccinated and I about punched my monitor. If there's ever a triage for medical care in that area then throw their asses out on the street if they aren't vaccinated to make room for someone who is vaccinated or has other health problems.
     
  5. CaneKnight

    CaneKnight FSU Private Board's Fav Poster
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    They don't deserve to live imo
     
  6. kinghill

    kinghill Well-Known Member
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    I get such a good chuckle still to this day on CaneKight’s wishing death upon people takes. So good.
     
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  7. Prospector

    Prospector I am not a new member
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    New UAMS modeling suggests COVID cases could surpass previous surge


    “Rapid community viral spread” of COVID-19 could exceed Arkansas’ previous peak numbers that included 66 deaths and more than 4,300 new cases reported in one day, according to new modeling from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS).

    Two primary reasons for an expected new surge that is already pressuring the state’s medical industry are the more transmissible Delta variant and the state’s low vaccination rate, noted the modeling report posted Tuesday (July 20). No county in the last month has exceeded a 5% increase in the number of persons over 12 who are vaccinated. However, the UAMS authors note the Delta variant has changed the rules to the extent the predictions posted Tuesday may be low.

    “The COVID-19 pandemic in Arkansas radically changed in the last two weeks. For this reason, the models we show in this report may already be out of date. In addition to the data presented in this report, our research suggests Arkansas is at the beginning of an exponential surge, which, in the long-term, may exceed the December/January surge in terms of cases and hospitalizations,” noted the report. “Our considered opinion is, with low vaccination rates, few Arkansans practicing personal mitigation behaviors, and state policies that seem to discourage protective measures, Arkansas is set to experience increased numbers of COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations.”

    Arkansas’ previous surge peaked in late December and January with a record 4,304 new cases reported on Jan. 1, a record 27,822 active cases posted Jan. 9, and a record 1,371 hospitalizations reported on Jan. 11. A record 66 deaths was reported Dec. 29.

    Following are some key points UAMS authors identified.
    • The COVID-19 test positivity rate in the state is over 20%. This is five times the national average. Although testing rates are low, this is a very high positivity rate, suggesting rapid community viral spread.

    • The 15-day model forecasts 371,276 cumulative COVID-19 cases in Arkansas by July 26, an increase of 16,000 new cases over what was reported by the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) on June 18. In the next 15 days, the number is expected to increase by an average of 1,039 cases per day.

    • The 30-day model forecasts 392,772 cumulative infections on Aug. 9, an increase of almost 36,000 cases over the number reported by the ADH on June 18, or an average of 1,236 cases per day.

    • The 15-day models continue to show Arkansans between ages 35 and 59 have the highest number of COVID-19 diagnoses, forecast to increase by 5,591 cases, and average of 372 cases per day. The model also forecasts an increase of 2,538 cases in children under 17, or a daily average of 169 cases.

    • The 15-day models forecast 19,970 cumulative hospitalizations and 5,660 cumulative intensive care patients by July 26. This means a daily average of 37 new patients and 20 new intensive care patients respectively.

    • The 30-day model forecasts 20,850 cumulative hospitalizations by Aug. 11, a daily average of 48 new patients. The group with the greatest number of hospitalizations continues to be adults ages 60 to 74. However, the 15-day model suggests hospitalizations of adults 35 to 59 will exceed those of patients 60 to 74 in the very near future.

    • The 15-day model forecasts 6,043 cumulative COVID-19 deaths by July 26, a daily average of almost three deaths.

    Hospitals in rural counties could be the most stressed during what UAMS is calling a “third wave.” Rural areas often have higher per capita infection rates and high rates of other chronic medical issues.

    “We can surmise these are the counties that will have significant problems protecting the health of their populations during future pandemics or the emerging“third wave” of COVID-infections associated with the Delta variant,” according to the report.

    The report also said the surge could risk the state’s economic health, suggesting that the public may again self-isolate and consumers could again hoard products.

    “The long-term impact will result from increasing numbers of employees who are seriously ill and unable to work, increasing number of employees who will manifest long-COVID symptoms, and disruptions to the supply chain. There may even be economic consequences if Arkansas is perceived as an unhealthy vacation or conference destination,” noted the report.
     
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  8. Jax Teller

    Jax Teller Well-Known Member
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    Ours is the honor system as well. And a dude who has open about not getting vaccinated but not wearing a mask is out for 2 weeks for...you guessed it. And he's been in close quarters with one of our coworkers who has MS.
     
  9. One Two

    One Two Send it!
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    Selfish motherfuckers
     
  10. Henry Blake

    Henry Blake No Springsteen is leaving this house!
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  11. prerecordedlive

    prerecordedlive Sworn Enemy of Standard Time
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    Do we work with the same shithead?

    My office neighbors a lady on the verge of retirement that is a 3 time cancer survivor, diabetic, and also on the verge of needing dialysis. Bless her heart, she opted to work in the office throughout the pandemic because it was just her and she wasn’t about to fuck with the 11” laptops we have or try to tote her monitors back and forth. Deeply religious lady but opted for vaccination at the earliest possible opportunity and has sworn by her mask and face shield in the presence of anyone. By some miracle, she was out for hip surgery the days I came in contact with the guy that I contracted Covid from.

    Given, he is not my intern and I have no jurisdiction over him but I would’ve moved heaven and earth to have him fired on the spot if he caused her any harm.
     
  12. theriner69er

    theriner69er Well-Known Member
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    There was an amazing story this morning on CBS This Morning.

    The teaser for the story was: new report says JnJ vaccine may not be as protective against the Delta variant, more with Dr. Agus coming up

    Then they came back and ran the story: a report says the JnJ vaccine is not as effective in protecting against he Delta variat, that a booster may be required, that the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines were more effective

    Then Dr Agus came on, and the conversation was something like this:

    Gayle: Dr Agus, what do you make of this new report just out?
    Dr. Agus: Not much, it's really not as it's being reported, this study only looked at antibodies in a lab setting, it did not look at T-cell response and in order to make these broad, sweeping conclusions about the effectiveness of a vaccine you really need to look at the entire picture, and real world examples, which we actually have in this case.
    Gayle: Yes, I was going to ask about that, with these breakthrough cases, have we seen more hospitalizations or deaths with people who receive the JnJ vaccine?
    Dr Agus: No, we have not, the Pfizer, Moderna, and JnJ vaccines have all proven to be very effective against the Delta variant, with some rare cases of hospitalizations, but by and large anyone vaccinated with any of those 3 vaccines has little to mild symptoms if infected with the Delta variant. In real world application, the JnJ vaccine has proven equally effective against the Delta variant as the other vaccines.
    Gayle: Well then why is this report getting so much media coverage????

    Hey fucktard, maybe it's because morons like you and your network are in a rush to report it, like you literally just did before you had a doctor on to tell you why you shouldn't report and tease that story like you did!
     
  13. Doc Louis

    Doc Louis Well-Known Member
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    It just amazes me how lazy, selfish, entitled, and willfully stupid white people can be sometimes.
     
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  14. Doc Louis

    Doc Louis Well-Known Member
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    Look they're communication majors not biology majors. You're asking a lot of people who took classes like "the history of communication" and "pr strategies".
     
    #82264 Doc Louis, Jul 21, 2021 at 10:24 AM
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2021 at 2:07 PM
  15. theriner69er

    theriner69er Well-Known Member
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    To be shocked that news outlets are irresponsibly putting out bad information 40 seconds after your news outlet ran a story irresponsibly putting out that bad information is....amazing.

    "Why is what we are doing happening, I just don't get it?!?!"
     
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  16. JGator1

    JGator1 I'm the Michael Jordan of the industry
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    Great stuff Zuck and Tucker
     
  17. Marbles

    Marbles Trudging the road to happy destiny
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    My wife manages a medical clinic. She’s scared of the vaccine and it doesn’t help that the doctor that works at the clinic is anti vax and telling her it’s not safe. He’s a terrible doctor but I’m going to sue his ass off if something happens to my wife. I just don’t know what to do.
     
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  18. Tobias

    Tobias dan “the man qb1” jones fan account
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    good call past me
     
  19. pperc

    pperc Well-Known Member
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    She’s your wife. If she’d rather listen to that asshole than you and rational, sane thought, you have your answer. It’s over.
     
  20. pperc

    pperc Well-Known Member
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    Also, what does this “medical clinic” do? And what is the “degree” this doctor has?
     
  21. Hoss Bonaventure

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    This is in MS right? I can see a dr being a fucking idiot there.
     
  22. Henry Blake

    Henry Blake No Springsteen is leaving this house!
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    https://www.theatlantic.com/science...elates-of-protection-vaccine-immunity/619508/
    We’re Zeroing In On the ‘Holy Grail’ of COVID-19 Immunity
    There’s no good way of measuring whether your vaccine worked—yet.

    By Katherine J. Wu

    When Kishana Taylor welcomes her twins into the world this December, she’ll be pretty confident that they won’t be carrying the virus that causes rubella, an infection that can be disastrous in infants. Thanks to a vaccine she received as a child, Taylor, a virologist at Carnegie Mellon University, is still immune to the pathogen decades later.

    She was able to confirm that in June through a simple test that searched her blood for antibodies that recognize the rubella virus, and then added them up. If her antibody counts were above a certain level, called a correlate of protection, she and her babies would be considered well shielded from disease. “You are considered immune with a titer of 9.9 to rubella,” she tweeted last month, referring to her antibody levels. “My titer? 116. I love my immune system sometimes.”

    The term correlate of protection doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue, but it’s one of the sexiest concepts in the field of vaccinology. Correlates are biological benchmarks—measurements of a single immune molecule or cell—that can show that a vaccine is achieving its desired effect. With a correlate in hand, researchers can confirm how well a shot is working and identify the rare individuals in whom it doesn’t take; they can suss out the need for boosters and fast-track the development of new vaccines. At their most powerful, correlates of protection boil down the complexities of an immune response to a single value—one that can confidently affirm that a person won’t get infected or seriously sick. “It’s kind of a magic number,” Ali Ellebedy, an immunologist at Washington University in St. Louis, told me. “It’s the big holy grail,” Emory University’s Sri Edupuganti says. “It’s what we dream about,” Cornell’s Sallie Permar told me last month.

    In recent weeks, the correlate community has been buzzing louder than ever. Scientists are on the cusp of confidently defining some correlates of protection against symptomatic disease for the COVID-19 vaccines. If confirmed, these correlates could revolutionize the way we tackle SARS-CoV-2 immunization: Vaccine makers testing a new inoculation may no longer need to follow tens of thousands of people for many months to test their product’s protection. Instead, they could inject just a few hundred people, snag some drops of blood, and see if the elusive correlate is met. That’s how we tee up new flu vaccines every year without the rigmarole of gargantuan clinical trials.

    But for all their apparent simplicity, correlates of protection are devilishly hard to come by. Try as researchers might, capturing the oomph of vaccine-induced immunity in one number—or several—isn’t always possible. Even as scientists chase them, correlates are a reminder of just how inscrutable our own bodies can be.

    Even our best vaccines start out as educated guesses. Researchers study people who have recovered from a particular infection, and then try to cook up an inoculation that will prompt protection that’s similar to or better than natural immunity. What ends up entering people is simple—a harmless pantomime of the pathogen. But it leads to a tortuously complex response that marshals the immune system’s many defensive players, including antibodies, B cells, T cells, and more.

    Finding a correlate means cleaving a single variable out of this mess to act as an envoy for the rest of the immune system. That’s a heavy lift for a single cell or molecule, especially when people react in such different ways to the same pathogen. And not all immune responses can be easily measured. Some of the vaccines we’ve been using for decades still don’t have a concrete correlate, including the shots for mumps, rotavirus, and tuberculosis.

    That probably won’t be the case for the COVID-19 vaccines. Since the pandemic’s early days, experts have had their eye on neutralizing antibodies, sometimes nicknamed “neuts,” which can glom on to the outside of viruses and block them from entering cells. Neuts that recognize the coronavirus teem in the bodies of people and laboratory animals that have successfully fought off coronavirus infections. The molecules’ disease-fighting powers have made them the workhorses of antibody-based treatments, such as convalescent plasma and monoclonals. Levels of these neuts also soar after vaccination, and seem especially high in people who don’t come down with COVID-19 after getting all their shots. By now it’s clear that neut numbers do correspond pretty well with protection—the more neuts someone has, the more likely it is that they’re safe from disease. “As far as I’m concerned, the data are clear,” Stanley Plotkin, a vaccine expert at the University of Pennsylvania, told me. “Neutralizing antibodies are it.”

    Establishing that this trend exists, though, isn’t the same as zeroing in on a cutoff for protection, above which most vaccinated people would likely be guarded from illness. “We know lower neutralizing titers predict more infection,” Taia Wang, an immunologist at Stanford, told me. “What we’re looking for now is a little more precision.” To suss out a more specific set of numbers, researchers need to repeatedly sample the blood of shot recipients, some of whom have to get sick so researchers can get a sense of what falls below the threshold they’re looking for. “The more breakthroughs you have, the easier it is to determine,” Katy Stephenson, a physician and vaccine expert at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, in Boston, told me. A great irony of vaccinology is that it’s easier to define the success of a vaccine that’s prone to regularly fail—one of the only downsides of our extraordinary shots.

    Another hurdle that correlate chasers need to clear is a lack of consistency across vaccine trials, which were conducted at different times in different populations using different inoculation recipes, different criteria for defining COVID-19 severity, and different brands of antibody tests. Aggregating and analyzing all the evidence to produce one unifying correlate requires some serious statistical gymnastics.

    Read: COVID-19 vaccine makers are looking beyond the spike protein

    By now, though, enough people have been vaccinated, and enough blood samples drawn, that preliminary numbers are starting to emerge. One group of researchers in the United Kingdom has proposed a correlate of protection against COVID-19 for AstraZeneca’s vaccine; two others, one in Australia and another in the United States, have taken a stab at pinpointing measurements that will hold true across several different shots, including the three available to Americans. (Representatives from Moderna, Pfizer, and Johnson & Johnson told me that they didn’t yet have their own correlates to report, but were continuing to investigate.)

    But the case isn’t closed. “We have some strong leads, but I would not say we have a correlate yet,” Holly Janes, a biostatistician at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, in Seattle, told me.

    While neuts have certainly hogged the spotlight so far, they could still be unseated by another molecule or cell. And even if neuts are the real deal, having one correlate doesn’t preclude defining another that captures an additional element of the immune system. Flu vaccines, for instance, seem to come with a bunch of measurable metrics of success, some of which are still being confirmed in research labs. Other, non-neutralizing antibodies exist, and their levels also seem to ratchet up in lockstep with COVID-19 vaccine efficacy.

    Many researchers are hoping for more data on T cells, immune cells that support the production of antibodies or annihilate virus-infected cells on their own. Compared with antibodies, T cells are fragile, reclusive, and a pain to measure, Smita Iyer, an immunologist at UC Davis, told me. But they seem fundamental to the success of well-established vaccines, including those for chicken pox and tuberculosis. Against the coronavirus, T cells are known to pick up the protective slack when neuts and other antibodies fail. “There’s not only one immune response that protects you, which is good,” Florian Krammer, a vaccine expert and virologist at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, told me. “If one fails, another can take over.” That redundancy is great for us, but frustrating for researchers looking for a simple portrait of protection.

    Things could get even thornier. As is the case with any vaccine, the success of a COVID-19 shot hinges on a multitude of factors—including the strength of the immune system it’s bolstering, the mutability of the virus it’s counteracting, and the exact ingredients in the shot itself. Kids, whose immune systems are still finding their footing, might need correlates of their own; so might older adults and immunocompromised people, whose immune systems are less easily marshaled by vaccines. The numbers we settle on could also vary among vaccine brands because different shots rile up different subsets of immune cells.

    Then there’s the biggest wild card of all: the coronavirus itself. It’s continuing to splinter into new variants, some of which have already revealed themselves to be quite capable of dodging certain antibody-based defenses. A neut level that keeps us safe from Alpha won’t necessarily thwart Beta or Delta to the same extent. (There’s at least good news on T cells, which are much harder to stump with mutations—another reason these cells are looking so attractive to some scientists.) “We’re starting to get numbers now, but there are going to be asterisks because of the variants,” Lisa Gralinski, a virologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, told me. Because correlates take so long to determine, “whatever number we come up with today is really talking about the past,” Stephenson, of Beth Israel, said. SARS-CoV-2 will always mutate far faster than humans can conjure new correlates. We may well end up with an entire menagerie of correlates against COVID-19, each tailored to its own combination of population, variant, and vaccine. (And that’s all just in the realm of blocking COVID-19 disease; stopping asymptomatic infection would require its own set of correlates as well.)

    But the mere possibility of hitting protection pay dirt is reason enough to keep plugging away. Having a strong correlate of protection against COVID-19 would allow researchers around the world to more quickly bring new vaccines to market in countries where they are sorely needed. A correlate would also give scientists the chance to monitor the natural wane of immune responses and deploy boosters that could rapidly buoy those defenses, if need be. It could act as a guidepost for new shots that fight specific variants before they outsmart the jabs we already have.


    The need for correlates is so urgent, the FDA has already gambled that antibodies are the answer: In recent guidance, the agency noted that it would consider green-lighting updated, variant-specific versions of vaccines if they’re able to prompt the production of adequate levels of neuts. It’s a hastier move than some researchers would like. But with variants such as Delta surging amid a largely unvaccinated global population, the shortcut offered by these correlates has never been more appealing. The big hope, researchers told me, is that COVID-19 vaccines will be able to follow in the footsteps of flu shots, which are reformulated seasonally to keep pace with the strains du jour. Vaccine makers can debut new vaccines by simply checking inoculated people’s blood for the telltale markers of protection, rather than waiting to see how these individuals fare against the virus itself.


    Spinning the idea of correlates into a personal guarantee of immunity is tempting, especially with antibody tests so readily available. But correlates are just that—correlates, patterns gleaned from large groups of people. Levels of certain immune fighters could track with protection against disease without being directly responsible for our vaccines’ success on a person-by-person basis. “We’re talking about measurements that apply better to populations than to individual people,” Plotkin said.

    Some correlates can be tested in individuals, such as in the case of the rubella-antibody test that Taylor took in June, after discovering she was pregnant. But these tests don’t offer absolute certainty. Every trend will have exceptions—some people whose SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels are bonkers-high may still end up getting sick; others with low titers will stay safe. Antibody stocks, after all, naturally dwindle over time, but the body retains the ability to replenish them. Thresholds aren’t hard lines between unprotected and protected; everyone always carries some relative risk, especially amid a pandemic this devastating. “There are no sharp edges in biology,” Iyer told me. Correlates, while useful, can’t actually encompass everything our immune systems are capable of. Without the right amount of nuance, they risk making black-and-white out of a situation that operates entirely in shades of gray.
     
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  23. The B1G Kucktis

    The B1G Kucktis 2 years, VARSITY!!
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    Lol a professional baseball team is at 50% and with 1/3 of the players. The Phillies are quite stupid.
     
  24. AbeFroman

    AbeFroman You touch me, I yell RAT!

    I used to think user CaneKnight was unnecessarily aggressive. Fast forward a couple years of this shitshow and his reactions seem more reasonable.
     
  25. prerecordedlive

    prerecordedlive Sworn Enemy of Standard Time
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    If you find yourself starting a response to a healthcare worker with “I read somewhere that”, and you don’t die of COVID afterwards, maybe you’ll at least die of shame. ༼ つ ◕_◕ ༽つ
     
  26. Marbles

    Marbles Trudging the road to happy destiny
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    He’s an MD. It’s a rural health clinic. He also oversees 4 nursing homes. He’s had Covid and thinks he’s protected.

    one thing I’ve noticed in Mississippi is the stark difference in education levels a vaccine status. Seems like if you have a BS or above you’ll get the vaccine. Below a BS degree and you don’t. It’s absolutely mind blowing.
     
  27. Jake Barnes

    Jake Barnes Team Mac OG
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    She, her husband and I have been best friends since childhood (The Blackfish knows them as well); he was on CNN and BBC maybe a year ago after the whole family got infected from one short family outing. They’ve been rabid advocates ever since, even among doctors.
     
  28. Illinihockey

    Illinihockey Well-Known Member
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    Delta infecting vaccinated people and the symptoms they experience being the exact same as allergies has me in a constant state of anxiety. How would I even know to go get tested or that I should isolate?
     
  29. beerleagueman

    beerleagueman Well-Known Member

    my brother had bad congestion and headaches the Last 5 days or so . took 2 abbot at home antigens that were negative and did a PCR yesterday but it was when he has started to feel better but also negative. still think he might have had it bc others with similar symptoms have been positive and in FL it is no longer allergy season . He had Pfizer dose 2 in April
     
  30. Hoss Bonaventure

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    My kid was sick last week with double ear infections and wife had to work from home and get tested to go back into the office. She was negative when she got tested Friday. I currently feel like shit. Just a lot of chest congestion and lungs hurt pretty bad when I have a cough. I’m going to get a rapid done at lunch tomorrow and seeing dr after work. It’s most likely nothing but better safe than sorry. I could have caught it leaving the gym Saturday as it is a blur rushing out of there and I know I didn’t wash my hands or use hand sanitizer or anything but I tore my bicep and was just thinking of getting home. Still wore a mask though. I assume they’ll test me before surgery next week as well. Better safe because my son is in daycare and need to know for all the kids sake.
     
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  31. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
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    A.B.P.
    Always Be Posting
     
  32. theriner69er

    theriner69er Well-Known Member
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    Here is where I, and I think a lot of people get confused: what are you supposed to do? I understand you get tested, and take precautions, but since you started to not feel well, how do you handle it? Just wear a mask when you are in public? Around your family? Isolate? Treat it as if you have covid until you prove otherwise? Like where is the line between being safe and being a little too reckless?
     
  33. Snakes

    Snakes stubbornly litigious
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    i am actually in a Braves group me with her husband. I remember when they all had it when his baby was a newborn. I wish more doctors were this outspoken.
     
  34. Simon Templar

    Simon Templar Well-Known Member
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    Chiropracter
     
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  35. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
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    This is exactly how I had to wear my mom down. My dad had a pulmonologist and a intensive care doctor who pretty much pulled him from the brink of death and they trust incredibly deeply. I explained the broad strokes of the mechanisms of the vaccine to my dad and how its extremely unlikely it will mind control you or edit your DNA in a single shot and why such a shot would much more like end up being in like your bone marrow instead of your arm, but mom kept getting carried away by shitty "doctor" interviews being passed around by her idiot chat groups, being terrified of scary words like "recombinant DNA" that we all encountered in high school bio but older folks apparently haven't. But they trusted that pulmonologist and other doctor with their lives.

    I basically ended up bullying her to have me over the phone, on every doctor's appointment my parents had, so I can ask the doctors directly the lunatic questions so I looked like the stupid asshole instead of them. It worked, though my mom still up to the very appointment sneered "i dont BELIEVE in the vaccine," like i gave a shit, but at least she was convinced it wasnt going to outright kill her at that point.
     
  36. Hoss Bonaventure

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    At this point unless we know that people are vaccinated then we won’t go and visit them, which thankfully isn’t anyone I can think of that we would be visiting anyways. Which all of it is going to be for naught once schools open up with no mask mandates.
     
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  37. PeterGriffin

    PeterGriffin Iced and/or sweet tea is for dirty rednecks.
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    Good fucking work, my guy. That’s the most I’ve seen anyone do to proactively push their parents on this issue. I’ve kind of thrown my hands up, my mom keeps pushing back because she needs a shingles vaccine that would interfere with a Covid vaccine of course, but she keeps dragging that out (while still internationally traveling to Mexico, super great!). My dad is a trucker who listens to horseshit conservative radio for most of his day driving so he’s unreachable.
     
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  38. Pile Driving Miss Daisy

    Pile Driving Miss Daisy It angries up the blood
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    It's your wife and life, but holy shit at trying to continue a marriage if she's this brainwashed.
     
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  39. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
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    Christ. Wish I could offer some way of helping through that but that's a tough situation too.

    I already saw my dad on a vent once for something unrelated. No fucking thanks to a round 2 with that
     
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  40. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
    Donor

    Dad, do you fully understand how many Nobel Prizes and cures for genetic diseases would have happened along the way to get us to the point of having what you THINK the evil vaccine has the capability to do?

    Scientists dont stfu about cool shit, but they're all quiet hush hush about a literal genocide shot?
     
  41. One Two

    One Two Send it!
    Donor
    Auburn TigersAtlanta Braves

    He’s making progress. Source: private board
     
  42. CaneKnight

    CaneKnight FSU Private Board's Fav Poster
    Donor

    This doesn’t shock me at all... what’s the numbers for Clemson...
     
  43. billdozer

    billdozer Well-Known Member
    Donor
    Clemson TigersCarolina Panthers

    All Dabo said was "I wish I could tell you we're all 100%. They're not all vaccinated, but we're in a good spot heading in a good direction."
     
  44. pez

    pez Competent
    Staff
    SMU Mustangs

    Certainly seems like someone (donors) finally got to some republicans

     
  45. Jake Barnes

    Jake Barnes Team Mac OG
    Donor
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesAtlanta Falcons

    And in return for her tireless work and advocacy, she gets lovely messages like this:

    FF7C8ED4-C2D0-4D80-8B81-EAF254657DF5.png

    Any and all doxxing is welcomed.
     
  46. Redav

    Redav One big ocean
    Donor

    Might want to blur out her number
     
  47. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
    Donor

    Right? It's exactly like surviving a roller coaster! You get off just as healthy and whole as you get on! No weeks/months in the hospital, no crippling medical debt. Are roller coasters even contagious?
     
  48. Jake Barnes

    Jake Barnes Team Mac OG
    Donor
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesAtlanta Falcons

    That’s the person who sent it, not hers
     
  49. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
    Donor

    would've been kinda funny for your wife to talk to you like that tho

    edit: no that would be sad :(
     
  50. Jake Barnes

    Jake Barnes Team Mac OG
    Donor
    Alabama Crimson TideAtlanta BravesAtlanta Falcons

    I made what I thought was the somewhat salient point that .02% of say 2M people is still 4,000 people dying from what amounts to peasant superstition.
     
    Jax Teller likes this.