COVID-19 info thread

Discussion in 'The Mainboard' started by TrustyPatches, Mar 15, 2020.

  1. pperc

    pperc Well-Known Member
    Donor

    Guys, this was NOT an EU approval. The EU will likely approve after the US. This was a UK approval and a signal that Brexit will lead to a more less strict UK drug approval process. There is no recent "historical precedent". Keep in mind that the UK was part of the EU approval system until Brexit.
     
    bertwing, slogan119, One Two and 3 others like this.
  2. pratyk

    pratyk Arsenal FC, Rutgers Scarlet Knights
    Rutgers Scarlet KnightsArsenal

    I know MA / VT have submitted their plans for quite a few days to EHS / CMS. I'm surprised there are communities that are just starting out but it may just be that the city/town's not big enough to have to figure that out early in the process.
     
    pperc likes this.
  3. Illinihockey

    Illinihockey Well-Known Member
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    Talked to a friend, state is passing the buck to the county level health departments. Front line workers and their families first, then long term care homes
     
  4. Lyrtch

    Lyrtch My second favorite meat is hamburger
    Staff Donor

    i hope this is true
     
  5. xec

    xec Well-Known Member
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    They’ve been developing plans. Some are more complete than others. My guess is that the notification spelled out a “due by” date and gave guidance on format, content “must haves”, etc...
     
    pperc likes this.
  6. xec

    xec Well-Known Member
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    Utah isn’t doing this. It’s frontline workers and long term care residents.
     
  7. Lyrtch

    Lyrtch My second favorite meat is hamburger
    Staff Donor

    yeah i doubt we do it here either as the logic behind it doesn't really make sense

    but selfishly
     
    xec likes this.
  8. Littyville

    Littyville Member

    Co worker was in contact with someone who tested positive on Sunday. She got a test yesterday and came back negative. Back at work today like nothing happened. And people wonder why numbers keep increasing
     
  9. Room 15

    Room 15 Mi equipo esta Los Tigres
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    Surprised they tested her that soon after exposure
     
  10. Littyville

    Littyville Member

    im surprised our employer said come back.
     
    Lefthook likes this.
  11. pnk$krtcrÿnästÿ

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    Paul's always good stuff

     
    pperc likes this.
  12. pratyk

    pratyk Arsenal FC, Rutgers Scarlet Knights
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    Not for the wife's hospital. But she's in the first batch of providers to receive the vaccine.
     
  13. pperc

    pperc Well-Known Member
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    One of the more enjoyable professors to take a graduate course with!
     
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  14. pperc

    pperc Well-Known Member
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    Eating inside a restaurant is really fucking stupid
     
  15. RonBurgundy

    RonBurgundy Well-Known Member

    Families are not a priority here.
    case number 1 million
     
  16. THF

    THF BITE THE NUTS, THUMB IN THE ASS!
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    This is great information and thank you for sharing. I have a couple family members who consider eating out as "safe" and this is concrete evidence is untrue.
     
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  17. slogan119

    slogan119 Her?
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    Not to be that guy but in “normal” times, imagine the amount of airborne bacteria we’re swapping when places are packed. It’s disgusting and makes me never want to eat out again.
     
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  18. Hoss Bonaventure

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    So basically being inside with a bunch of strangers not wearing masks is a bad idea.
     
  19. THF

    THF BITE THE NUTS, THUMB IN THE ASS!
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    I am a huge advocate of masks and wear one everytime I leave the house. However, I am seeing more and more examples where masks are NOT a magic bullet. There are examples of people wearing masks incorrectly and getting infected. I think masks are only one part of a comprehensive defense to getting this virus.

    I am not comfortable in an enclosed space with others simply because I have a mask.
     
  20. Hoss Bonaventure

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    Saw some chin diapers and nose huggers at the gym this morning. That’s just insane to me.
     
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  21. Keef

    Keef Well-Known Member
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    I think if worn correctly they are pretty effective. Too many examples of "I was wearing a mask" and it was below the nose, etc...
     
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  22. Hoss Bonaventure

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    I don’t understand it either. I wear a kn95 when I workout for an hour and a half and it’s not like I’m suffocating. It’s not that bad at all. I will never understand how someone couldn’t wear one because “they can’t breathe” in them if they don’t already have underlying health conditions. In which case they should definitely have one on.
     
    Keef likes this.
  23. goblue31602

    goblue31602 Well-Known Member
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    They can't breathe because they're being suffocated by The Man infringing on their rights, or something like that.
     
  24. Room 15

    Room 15 Mi equipo esta Los Tigres
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    I do think some of these things provide false senses of security. Especially this new deal of building full enclosures outdoors and calling it outdoor dining.

    I understand why restaurants do it but safe is not the word that comes to mind when I look at that.
     
  25. goblue31602

    goblue31602 Well-Known Member
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    Yep, we ate at a few restaurants when it was still warm, and only ate in very wide open outdoor areas with nobody near us. A nice dinner isn't worth getting covid.
     
  26. Russellin4885

    Russellin4885 Well-Known Member
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    North Carolina State Wolfpack

    If they're complaining about not being able to breath while just lifting, then yea. I've started to do cardio last couple weeks in a mask and there are definitely times I have felt like I couldn't breathe, glad it's cold too cause even in 30 degree weather it gets pretty sweaty and nasty.
     
  27. NDfanPSUgrad

    NDfanPSUgrad Well-Known Member
    Penn State Nittany LionsNotre Dame Fighting Irish

    I know it effects everyone differently but is there a timeline from exposure to likely symptoms. Dealing with it currently with the extended family. Mother in law just tested positive who very likely got it from a coworker that was recently hospitalized. Wife was recently tested on Tuesday but still waiting results and isolated at home. My daughter and I seem fine but we were all at dinner together on Sunday and thanksgiving dinner Thursday.
     
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  28. Henry Blake

    Henry Blake No Springsteen is leaving this house!

    COVID-19
    Typically, a person develops symptoms 5 days after being infected, but symptoms can appear as early as 2 days after infection or as late as 14 days after infection, and the time range can vary.
    https://www.cdc.gov/flu/symptoms/flu-vs-covid19.htm#:~:text=Typically, a person develops,time range can vary.

     
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  29. xec

    xec Well-Known Member
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    Some interesting news from my wife’s hospital in regards to the immunization of front line health care workers. ER and Covid unit employees are at the top of the list. Next? Environmental Services employees. At her hospital the ES staff have been hit wayyyy harder than any other group. Two contributing factors: Lower level of education (don’t fully understand the risks, etc...) and cramped living conditions at home.

    Also, because these are new vaccines, the hospital is not requiring employees to be vaccinated. This is a departure from the existing vaccination policy. However, they don’t anticipate many employees opting out. In the future this option will be removed and it will be required.
     
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  30. It'sAlwaysSunnyInAthens

    It'sAlwaysSunnyInAthens Well-Known Member
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    So my mother in law watched my baby Saturday and Sunday she's coughing, headache behind the eyes, fever. Has felt better last two days. My baby usually stays with my parents while I work but I've taken off work the last couple days to keep her at home.

    My question, would you guys trust a negative rapid test to send her back to my parents?
     
  31. goblue31602

    goblue31602 Well-Known Member
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    I'm not a doc but I'd recommend a test 3-5 days after symptom onset for the most accurate result. Not sure about the accuracy of the rapid vs PCR tests though.

    My mom just went through something similar after seeing a friend, but it appears the friend just had a regular cold.
     
    xec likes this.
  32. xec

    xec Well-Known Member
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    Interesting information regarding the impact of the vaccine during periods of rapid virus spread. It’s from the NYT’s morning briefing. It’s the first part of the briefing spoilered below.

    View in browser|nytimes.com
    Continue reading the main story
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    December 8, 2020

    [​IMG]
    By David Leonhardt

    Good morning. Britain has begun vaccinations. But that matters less in the short term than you may think.

    The vaccine as a fire hose
    [​IMG]
    Margaret Keenan became the first patient in Britain to receive the vaccine. It was administered on Tuesday by May Parsons in Coventry, England.Pool photo by Jacob King
    The vaccine news continues to seem very encouraging. Britain started its mass vaccination effort today, and the U.S. isn’t far behind.

    But there is still one dark cloud hanging over the vaccines that many people don’t yet understand.

    The vaccines will be much less effective at preventing death and illness in 2021 if they are introduced into a population where the coronavirus is raging — as is now the case in the U.S. That’s the central argument of a new paper in the journal Health Affairs. (One of the authors is Dr. Rochelle Walensky of Massachusetts General Hospital, whom President-elect Joe Biden has chosen to run the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

    An analogy may be helpful here. A vaccine is like a fire hose. A vaccine that’s 95 percent effective, as Moderna’s and Pfizer’s versions appear to be, is a powerful fire hose. But the size of a fire is still a bigger determinant of how much destruction occurs.

    I asked the authors of the Health Affairs study to put their findings into terms that we nonscientists could understand, and they were kind enough to do so. The estimates are fairly stunning:

    • At the current level of infection in the U.S. (about 200,000 confirmed new infections per day), a vaccine that is 95 percent effective — distributed at the expected pace — would still leave a terrible toll in the six months after it was introduced. Almost 10 million or so Americans would contract the virus, and more than 160,000 would die.
    • This is far worse than the toll in an alternate universe in which the vaccine was only 50 percent effective but the U.S. had reduced the infection rate to its level in early September (about 35,000 new daily cases). In that scenario, the death toll in the next six months would be kept to about 60,000.
    It’s worth pausing for a moment on this comparison, because it’s deeply counterintuitive. If the U.S. had maintained its infection rate from September and Moderna and Pfizer had announced this fall that their vaccines were only 50 percent effective, a lot of people would have freaked out.

    But the reality we have is actually worse.

    [​IMG]
    U.S. data, as collected by The New York Times.
    How could this be? No vaccine can eliminate a pandemic immediately, just as no fire hose can put out a forest fire. While the vaccine is being distributed, the virus continues to do damage. “Bluntly stated, we’ll get out of this pandemic faster if we give the vaccine less work to do,” A. David Paltiel, one of the Health Affairs authors and a professor at the Yale School of Public Health, told me.

    There is one positive way to look at this: Measures that reduce the virus’s spread — like mask-wearing, social distancing and rapid-result testing — can still have profound consequences. They can save more than 100,000 lives in coming months.

    THE LATEST NEWS
    THE VIRUS
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    A funeral home in El Paso this month.Paul Ratje/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
    • In the past seven days, 15,813 people in the U.S. died from the virus, breaking a record that had stood since mid-April.
    • Gov. Andrew Cuomo said New York would restrict indoor dining if hospitalization rates didn’t stabilize. New York City could lose indoor dining as soon as Monday.
    • Once Pfizer delivers its first 100 million vaccine doses to the U.S., the country may not get another batch until June. That’s because the Trump administration passed on a deal last summer to secure more shots, and the European Union bought them.
    THE PRESIDENTIAL TRANSITION
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    Lloyd Austin would be the first African-American to lead the Pentagon.Stephen Crowley/The New York Times
    • Biden plans to nominate Lloyd Austin, a retired Army general and former commander of the American military effort in Iraq, to be the defense secretary.
    • President Trump twice called the Republican speaker of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives to encourage challenges to the election results. Trump has made repeated false claims about voter fraud, in an effort to remain in office despite losing the election.
    • Nearly 1,500 former federal prosecutors and other lawyers signed an open lettercalling for bar associations to investigate members of Trump’s legal team for advancing those false claims. “A license to practice law is not a license to lie to the public,” they wrote.
    • Georgia election officials will open just five early voting locations in Cobb County, outside Atlanta, for the Senate runoff elections, down from 11 for the general election. Republicans control Cobb County, which Biden won by 14 percentage points.
    OTHER BIG STORIES
    • The Environmental Protection Agency declined to strengthen controls on industrial soot emissions. The move defies scientific research, including from the agency’s own public health experts, about the links between the pollutants and respiratory illness.
    • Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain said he would travel to Brussels this week, taking control of efforts to strike a trade deal with the European Union before a Dec. 31 deadline.
    • MSNBC promoted Rashida Jones, an executive at the network, to become its next president, making her the first Black woman to take charge of a major television news network.
    • Chuck Yeager — the first pilot to break the sound barrier and a central figure in the book “The Right Stuff” — died on Monday at age 97.
    • Paul Sarbanes, a former senator from Maryland, died at 87 on Sunday. He introduced the first article of impeachment against Richard Nixon and, decades later, helped write legislation strengthening accounting standards after the Enron scandal.
    • The Puerto Rican rapper and singer Bad Bunny’s latest album, “El Último Tour del Mundo,” is the first LP entirely in Spanish to top the Billboard 200 album chart.
    MORNING READS
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    Western Hemlocks and Pacific Red Cedar.Brendan George Ko for The New York Times
    The social life of forests: Do trees communicate and cooperate with one another? It appears so. Read the story in the Magazine, or listen to it on a special episode of “The Daily.”

    A debate: One former head of Medicare calls Xavier Becerra “a great fit” to lead the Department of Health and Human Services, The Washington Post reports. In his Times Opinion column, Ross Douthat says the nomination is a warning sign that Biden will abandon the moderate approach that offers his best chance for political success.

    Lives Lived: As a pro wrestler, Pat Patterson knew how to delight fans. As an executive of World Wrestling Entertainment, he introduced the Royal Rumble, a last-man-standing free-for-all that has been popular ever since. When he announced in 2014 that he was gay, Patterson’s fans remained loyal. He died at 79.

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    ARTS AND IDEAS
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    Bob Dylan performing in Los Angeles in 2012.Chris Pizzello/Associated Press
    The Rights They Are A-Sold
    Bob Dylan has sold his catalog of more than 600 songs to Universal Music for an estimated $300 million. It may be the biggest acquisition of one songwriter’s publishing rights, and it’s another landmark for Dylan, who in 2016 won the Nobel Prize in Literature.

    Universal will now collect fees any time Dylan’s songs are sold, streamed, covered by another musician or used in ads and movies. That makes Dylan’s catalog especially lucrative: Other artists have recorded his songs more than 6,000 times, and they have appeared often in movies, including “The Big Lebowski” and “Bad Santa 2.”

    The deal is the latest in a string of such purchases: In October the DJ Calvin Harris sold his publishing catalog for an estimated $100 million, and last week the singer-songwriter Stevie Nicks sold a majority stake of her catalog for an estimated $80 million.

    As streaming comes to dominate the music market, more investors are snapping up music copyrights. “Streaming has changed the landscape, from a licensing and royalty perspective,” one expert told The Washington Post. “Even though there’s eye-popping price tags, if you look at the returns in five, 10, or 20 years, these are viewed as very good investments.”

    PLAY, WATCH, EAT
    WHAT TO COOK
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    Packed with apple, sausage and mustard, this lentil soup makes for a hearty weeknight meal.

    WORLD THROUGH A LENS
    Take a virtual trip to the waters of Lake Victoria, in Kenya, where fishermen attract fish, locally known as omena, with lanterns.

    FOR NEW YORKERS, NEAR AND FAR
    New York Magazine has done something different with its annual “Reasons to Love New York” issue: It pays tribute to 500 places that have shut down since the pandemic began.

    AWARDS SEASON?
    Welcome to “The Quarries” — Vulture’s first (and ideally, last) list dedicated to the cultural works that shaped a year spent in isolation.

    TAKE A TRIP BACKWARDS
    Looking for some historical fiction to transport you? Here are some of the year’s best offerings.

    NOW TIME TO PLAY
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  33. pnk$krtcrÿnästÿ

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    Without a fever, and with symptoms significantly improved? Maybe.

    With a fever? Not really.
     
  34. It'sAlwaysSunnyInAthens

    It'sAlwaysSunnyInAthens Well-Known Member
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    Thanks for the response.. Mil tested positive so we are on lock down.
     
    pperc likes this.
  35. It'sAlwaysSunnyInAthens

    It'sAlwaysSunnyInAthens Well-Known Member
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    Next question.. Do I need to get 16 month old tested at some point or is riding it out for 14 days sufficient? We've called our pediatrician just to let her know what's going on and to find out what to watch for. Waiting on a call back.
     
  36. NDfanPSUgrad

    NDfanPSUgrad Well-Known Member
    Penn State Nittany LionsNotre Dame Fighting Irish

    Dealing with a family group of COVID at the moment and I thought I had a handle on stuff but there is no consistent or clear guidance. Wife tested on Tuesday last week and got her results back Saturday night positive. Most likely this was a result of a Thanksgiving day dinner where my MIL brought it for everyone (yes I am blaming her directly). My wife has been isolating so I’ve never been as exhausted taking care of my 7 year old alone and I’m not showing near the symptoms my wife had. I just had a bad headache for longer than ever and had some dizziness. Anyway I’m taking my daughter who had no symptoms except for a small headache one day and now a small rash on her hand for a drive through test tomorrow and I am getting tested too. We won’t get results back before my wife’s 14 days from her test so she’s content to stay isolated even though I do believe we all have it. (Her mom, dad and sister all tested postive)
     
    ~ taylor ~ and One Two like this.
  37. pperc

    pperc Well-Known Member
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    ride it out. no test needed.
     
  38. goblue31602

    goblue31602 Well-Known Member
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    Hope you all pull through ok, I feel like this is going to be a pretty common story over Thanksgiving and again over XMas.
     
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  39. NDfanPSUgrad

    NDfanPSUgrad Well-Known Member
    Penn State Nittany LionsNotre Dame Fighting Irish

    Thanks. It’s just crazy. We are a stay at home family with our jobs and taught our daughter remote. Our circle was just my in laws and that was all it took for a shitty coworker in my MiLs office of 4 to fuck all this up.
     
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  40. Fuzzy Zoeller

    Fuzzy Zoeller College football > NFL

    I say a quote from an epidemiologist in the NYT who said their life will never be as it was pre-2020, in regards to going out in public.

    WHAT
     
  41. slogan119

    slogan119 Her?
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  42. RonBurgundy

    RonBurgundy Well-Known Member

    Probably. Like, your doctor’s office vs Walgreens might be offering different versions. Our own org is reportedly getting shipments from moderna and Pfizer.
     
    slogan119, pperc, Henry Blake and 3 others like this.
  43. RonBurgundy

    RonBurgundy Well-Known Member

    Academics are sometimes out of touch with real people.

    I think this will change how a segment of the population handles flu season and mass indoor gatherings, but the majority of people will go back to normal.
     
  44. BlazingRebel

    BlazingRebel Dog Crew Founder Migraine Connoisseur
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  45. Illinihockey

    Illinihockey Well-Known Member
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    What’s the incidence of negative rapid test but positive pcr test?
     
  46. goblue31602

    goblue31602 Well-Known Member
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    This, also that epidemiologist was quoted in the NYT because they said that. Wouldn't be the first or last person to do something for attention.
     
  47. 1

    1 A real fan. GBR!
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    I do think that the next couple years will be a bit different. I mean there will be concerts again and people at sporting events, etc. in 2021 but I feel like it will truly be another couple years before real "normal" for everyone. I mean if there's not another pandemic around the corner, 99% of the population will be YOLO by 2023 at the latest.
     
  48. Fargin' Icehole

    Fargin' Icehole 50% soulless
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    I hope there are permanent changes. Handshake needs to go. Masks in public places during flu season. I could make a list.
     
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  49. RonBurgundy

    RonBurgundy Well-Known Member

    Masks on airplanes in flu season would be amazing.

    more work from home
     
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  50. pnk$krtcrÿnästÿ

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    I hope we start to believe there IS a pandemic around the corner. Always is.

    ID docs are all jimcareyyeah.gif
     
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