Detroit Tigers Thread: Whatevs

Discussion in 'The Mainboard' started by Celemo, Apr 9, 2015.

  1. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    And don’t kid yourself. Rosenthal had a clause in his contract that we had to call him up after 15 days, that’s only reason he would sign with us.
     
  2. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
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    Indians with a clean sweep. Expect Norris to give up 4 homers tonight, maybe more.

    If that’s true about Rosenthal’s contract Avila should be fired. Fucking pitiful
     
  3. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    Time to put Rosemthal in. LFG
     
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  4. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
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    Victor did Trevor’s job
     
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  5. MG2

    MG2 No judgement in brainstorming
    Donor

    If Rosenthal had a clause in his contract that he had to be called up or the team would have to release him, that's not uncommon for FAs who have a somewhat decent MLB track record and sign minor league deals. They happen all the time.
     
    #7605 MG2, Jul 15, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2019
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  6. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
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    Jack Morris just called the tigers the twins on the broadcast
     
  7. MG2

    MG2 No judgement in brainstorming
    Donor

    I'm not going to buy much of the "they're asking for an insane return" for Boyd rumors that will come out the next two weeks. I'm not sure what they're supposed to do in this scenario.

    Trading him just to trade him is stupid. The only reason to trade him is if you think you're getting more than 100% of his future value. There's reason to believe that future value is good/very good. At the same time, if I were a team looking for starting pitching, I probably wouldn't give up that kind of haul for Boyd.

    I still think it's possible he gets moved, but these deals are hard to do historically, and they're harder to pull off now than ever before.
     
  8. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
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    So are we at a day in age where trying to win a World Series by mortgaging the future is obsolete?

    I don’t see why the Astros wouldn’t move tucker for Boyd. Boyd would put the over the top for years to come and they have an unbelievable lineup already.
     
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  9. MG2

    MG2 No judgement in brainstorming
    Donor

    Pretty much.

    It was pulling teeth to get the Astros to give up 3 non-elite prospects for Justin Verlander in 2017 when he had been pitching like a monster for 6 weeks and clearly back to where he was. And, to hear the Astros tell the story, it was an impossibly difficult decision to give up that much.

    Teams generally don't trade as much today as they did even 5-7 years ago, and I'm not sold a team is going to be willing to pay that price for a guy like Boyd, who has no track record of even being an average #3 starter until this season.
     
  10. spartanchuck

    spartanchuck Well-Known Member

    It seems like the year we traded Price away, was the year teams stopped giving up top prospects. Perfect timing for our rebuild.
     
    MG2 likes this.
  11. MG2

    MG2 No judgement in brainstorming
    Donor

    Pretty much. The game has been trending this way for a while because analytics were showing the worth of prospects. The last few CBAs pushed the old way of mega deals out, for the most part. Prospects and draft picks are just too valuable now, and the internet being flooded with prospect rankings and information has made fans change the way they root for teams. Used to be most fans wanted their team to go for it all the time. Now, with all the prospect info available, fans want their teams to hold on to any young player who is any good.
     
  12. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
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    Nerd baseball fans interest in prospects should have no barring on how front office personnel operate. The goal is to win games and compete. Not have 100 awesome prospects like the rays and can’t make the playoffs ever.
     
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  13. spartanchuck

    spartanchuck Well-Known Member

    I'm probably in the minority, but I honestly don't think Avila's trades at the time of them were all that bad, on the whole. Some were worse and some were better.

    The reason he should be fired is because of our terrible scouting, drafting and player development. Dombrowski was terrible at all of that, and most of that staff stayed, including Avila.
     
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  14. MG2

    MG2 No judgement in brainstorming
    Donor

    I think it absolutely changes the way owners push their front offices to make moves if their fans aren't yelling for them to make a big move. And you're kidding yourself if you don't think prospect rankings and all that online stuff matters when it comes to front offices and their job security.
     
  15. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
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    So do you think that’s part of why Dumbroski got fired?
     
  16. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    Fuck Avila

    Only reason they have top 15 prospect team is because they don’t call up their prospects like other teams are doing.

    And stop making excuses for him eventually fucking up the Boyd trade. He sucks at negotiating. Only thing the fat fuck is good at negotiating is a discount on a cheeseburger
     
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  17. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
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    Fuck yeah preach brother.
     
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  18. MG2

    MG2 No judgement in brainstorming
    Donor

    No, but it helps GMs keep their jobs when their teams suck when their minor league systems are highly regarded.
     
  19. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
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    Maybe the league should issue best minor league ranking awards every year.
     
    Tug likes this.
  20. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    This man. Our drafts, international free agents, and scouting is awful. Avila has been around this franchise for almost 20 years.
     
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  21. DeToxRox

    DeToxRox Forks Up
    Staff Donor TMB OG

  22. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    Wtf. He dominated that league a few months ago.
     
  23. MG2

    MG2 No judgement in brainstorming
    Donor

    Seems like he's just rusty and his command wasn't what it needed to be. They're acting like his health is completely fine, because he threw a few innings in the pen after they pulled him last time and then he got through four tonight.
     
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  24. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
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  25. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    Fuckin rain. Better get this game in
     
  26. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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  27. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
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    Casty is on a tear- what’s the realistic return for him?
     
  28. RalfBully

    RalfBully #21
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    Pitching machine and bag of balls
     
  29. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    I think we can get a weak hitting middle infielder
     
  30. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
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    Vinegar Strokes your girl Waldon ranked prospects mid season

    Each year at The Athletic Detroit, we create a list of the Tigers’ Top 30 prospects three times: in the preseason, at midseason and at season’s end.

    Preseason evaluation is a carryover from how the previous year ended, offseason trades and other revisions that impact the pipeline. Midseason looks at first-half performances, the newest draft class and promotions/demotions. When the season ends, we look at overall successes, struggles and how new acquisitions were able to acclimate to Detroit’s organization.

    Each of these perspectives are important for the Tigers amid their rebuild. And now that general manager Al Avila has received a contract extension, they also give a well-rounded view of how the plan for the rebuild is playing out.

    Just beyond the midseason point for the farm system, we’re back to comb through the Tigers’ pipeline with additions, subtractions and a few key players who refuse to be ignored.

    Let’s dive in.

    1. Casey Mize: RHP
    2019 Assignments: High A/Double A
    Age: 22
    Height/weight: 6-3/220 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    After holding Mize to 13.2 innings in 2018, the Tigers let him loose this season and he has handled the new workload with ease.

    Mize rocked the Eastern League with a complete-game no-hitter in his Double-A debut, following a 0.34 ERA and 1.86 FIP over 26.2 innings in the Florida State League.

    Now 52 innings deep into the Eastern League, Mize’s focus is on his fastball command, playing off a biting secondary mix. Mixing a plus slider and plus-plus splitter, Mize has the luxury of leaning on his offspeed mix while he finds command of his plus fastball flow.

    It’s not out of the question for Mize to make his Tigers debut this fall, but considering their position in the standings, there’s no real need to rush him.

    2. Matt Manning: RHP
    2019 Assignment: Double A
    Age: 21
    Height/weight: 6-6/215 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    Manning’s development is progressing at the Tigers’ desired pace.

    He made his Eastern League debut in 2018, his third assignment that season. Led by his plus fastball, Manning’s focus moved to his secondary last season and he’s encouraged by the progress.

    “I love how my changeup’s looking,” Manning said. “I can throw it early or late in the count. It’s just another weapon that I can use.”

    Manning’s curve has also progressed, helping to hold his FIP to 3.13 or lower over seven affiliate assignments.

    A promotion to Triple-A looks to be right around the corner for the 21-year-old.

    3. Riley Greene: OF
    2019 Assignments: GCL/Short-season
    Age: 18
    Height/weight: 6-3/200 pounds
    Bats/throws: L/L

    Landing among the Tigers’ top 3 prospects, Greene is also one of three first-round draft picks from three of the last four classes for Detroit.

    As a member of an offense-heavy draft class, Greene’s advanced approach at the plate forced evaluators to give more attention to his projection and less toward his high school career.

    Sixteen games into his professional career, Greene is already on his second minor-league assignment, with the short-season Connecticut Tigers, and likely to see another move before the end of the year based on how well he’s handled the transition. He’s on an eight-game hit streak between the GCL and New York-Penn League.

    4. Daz Cameron: OF
    2019 Assignment: Triple A
    Age: 22
    Height/weight: 6-2/195 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    Cameron is feeling the impact of a challenging season. After slashing .285/.367/.470 with Double-A Erie to earn a promotion to Toledo in 2018, Cameron has struggled to maintain consistency at the plate after a return to Triple A this season.

    He has the profile to handle center field, but a 29.7 percent strikeout rate and a .309 wOBA show there is still work ahead to become a big-league hitter.

    Despite the uphill battle, Cameron’s profile is a good example of how players’ development tracks vary. I still see enough of a five-tool player to not be concerned.

    [​IMG]
    Isaac Paredes at this month’s Futures Game. (David Richard / USA TODAY Sports)
    5. Isaac Paredes: 3B
    2019 Assignment: Double A
    Age: 20
    Height/weight: 5-11/225 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    We’re barely into the second half of the regular season and Paredes has already had a whirlwind year.

    He was selected for the MLB Futures Game in Cleveland, then participated right after in the Eastern League All-Star Game, where he collected the most points in the Home Run Derby.

    Back for his second stint with Double-A Erie, Paredes is spending more time at third base after working primarily as a shortstop leading into this season.

    The transition isn’t a surprise considering his advanced physique, but we will see whether the Tigers hold him to third or if a shift to second comes further down the road.

    Paredes’ eye at the plate and advanced barrel control both play to his favor.

    6. Jake Rogers: C
    2019 Assignments: Double A/Triple A
    Age: 24
    Height/weight: 6-1/205 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    Rogers had nothing to prove defensively this season. He needed to hit, and he found his stride at the plate with Erie, resulting in a promotion to the International League.

    Now 39 games into Triple A, Rogers still must cut down on his 27.2 percent strikeout rate, but he’s slashing .221/.320/.435. That’s what the Tigers need for him to eventually get behind the plate in Detroit.

    7. Parker Meadows: OF
    2019 Assignment: Class A
    Age: 19
    Height/weight: 6-5/205 pounds
    Bats/throws: L/R

    The pressure on Meadows, a second-round draft selection in 2018, was much higher entering the season than usual for a 19-year-old. His progression hasn’t been instantaneous, but he’s beginning to put the pieces together.

    Meadows’ biggest jump came between May and June, when he raised his average from .206 to .250 and dropped his strikeout rate from 36 percent to 20.3.

    The mix of plus speed, a plus arm and intense raw power give a preview of what to expect once Meadows matures physically and adjusts to a challenging league.

    8. Willi Castro: SS
    2019 Assignment: Triple A
    Age: 22
    Height/weight: 6-1/205 pounds
    Bats/throws: S/R

    Castro has had time to get acclimated to a new system since being acquired by Detroit from Cleveland in July 2018, and he’s back for his second run through Triple A this season.

    He’s one of the purest near-big-league-ready middle infielders, but the Tigers have opted to not rush Castro. That choice appears to be a good one.

    Castro plays from a natural athleticism defensively, but keeping him in the International League for a bit longer may prepare him for more staying power in the major leagues.

    With 19 errors over 79 games this season, Castro needs to tighten defensively. He’s slashing .294/.377/.436 at the plate and should see Detroit before the end of the year.

    9. Alex Faedo: RHP
    2019 Assignment: Double A
    Age: 23
    Height/weight: 6-5/230 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    Faedo has done a fantastic job of rebounding from a tough 2018 campaign. He returned to Double A after tossing 60 innings for the SeaWolves last season, and his numbers show his progress.

    In 2019, Faedo has dropped his walks per nine innings from 3.3 to 1.7, his FIP from 5.81 to 3.57 and his WHIP from 1.27 to 1.10 over the course of 94 innings.

    Scouts say he has noticeably improved. If he’s able to tap into the bite his pitch mix had at the University of Florida, a promotion to Triple A shouldn’t be far off.

    10. Beau Burrows: RHP
    2019 Assignments: High A/Double A/Triple A*
    Age: 22
    Height/weight: 6-2/215 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R
    (*High-A and Double-A were rehab assignments)

    After spending a portion of 2017 and all of 2018 in the Eastern League, the Tigers rewarded Burrows with a jump to Triple A. Tendinitis in his throwing arm, though, set Burrows back and pushed him into rehab before the first half of the season was completed.

    Following a rehab appearance in Lakeland and Erie, Burrows is seemingly back on track with scoreless work in four of his last six outings between Lakeland, Erie and his return to Toledo.

    Burrows has developed more confidence behind his secondary and if he’s able to keep his sequencing sharp, he could be in consideration for a look in Detroit this fall, health permitting.

    11. Tarik Skubal: LHP
    2019 Assignments: High A/Double A
    Age: 22
    Height/weight: 6-3/215 pounds
    Bats: L/L

    Skubal has exploded onto the scene for Detroit since being selected in the ninth round of the 2018 MLB Draft out of Seattle University.

    Pre-draft concerns centered on his durability and there was talk of a future out of the bullpen. But Skubal has had dominant performances in both High A and Double A this season and is doing everything possible to force his name as a legitimate rotation piece.

    Cranking out 11.8 strikeouts per nine innings between High A and Double A, Skubal hasn’t allowed more than one earned run in each of his last seven outings.

    12. Nick Quintana: 3B
    2019 Assignment: Class A
    Age: 21
    Height/weight: 5-10/187 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    Ranked No. 54 out of 610 MLB Draft players by Perfect Game, Quintana has enough intrigue to potentially surprise some people. The 2019 second-rounder carries the confidence of a Pac-12 infielder, and the Tigers aren’t needing to do too much grooming often necessary for less-experienced players.

    “Good glove with some juice at the plate,” an evaluator said. “If he hits .260, he’ll play every day.”

    Quintana made a quick jump to the Midwest League after being drafted. As expected, his defense has been strong, and his hitting needs some polish.

    Natural pop and raw athleticism at the plate have Quintana poised to move quickly, once he settles in offensively.

    13. Wenceel Perez: SS
    2019 Assignment: Class A
    Age: 19
    Height/weight: 5-11/195 pounds
    Bats/throws: S/R

    Perez has had one of the more trying seasons in his young career. He’s still viewed by opposing scouts as a legitimate infield prospect, but his strikeout percentage is up almost 9 points from 2018 to 20.0 percent this season.

    Perez is still playing as a pure shortstop, with a focus on polishing his footwork and reads off the bat. His instincts are in place, but he must iron out timing and not get ahead of himself defensively.

    He needs more discipline at the plate to be able to advance.

    [​IMG]
    Injuries have slowed Kyle Funkhouser the past three seasons. (Mark Cunningham / MLB Photos via Getty Images)
    14. Kyle Funkhouser: RHP
    2019 Assignments: High A/Double A/Triple A*
    Age: 25
    Height/weight: 6-2/230 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R
    (*High-A and Double-A were rehab assignments)

    Despite clawing his way up the pipeline, Funkhouser hasn’t been able to catch a break when it comes to his health.

    After his seasons were cut short in 2017 and 2018 due to injuries, Funkhouser landed on the IL again in May and was sidelined for nearly a month.

    At full strength, Funkhouser’s four-pitch mix, led by a plus fastball, is effective enough for a big-league look. His struggle to stay in top form, though, has hindered that opportunity.

    The Tigers like what Funkhouser is capable of. If he can stay healthy, there’s no reason why he shouldn’t be in consideration for a look in Detroit this fall.

    15. Franklin Perez: RHP
    2019 Assignments: High A
    Age: 21
    Height/weight: 6-3/197 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    The curious case of Perez continues.

    Viewed as the cornerstone piece in the Astros trade for Justin Verlander, Perez has been held to such a limited level of exposure due to his health, it’s hard to project his future.

    Since arriving with Detroit in August 2017, lingering shoulder inflammation has limited Perez to a combined 26.3 innings. He pitched 7.2 with Lakeland in 2019, with one start in May and one in June.

    His pitch mix stands as one of the sharpest in the pipeline, but he hasn’t had any opportunity to showcase it.

    16. Andre Lipcius: 2B
    2019 Assignment: Class A
    Age: 21
    Height/weight: 6-1/190 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    Ranked 145th in the MLB Pipeline Draft Top 200, 2019 third-round selection Lipcius and his seasoned bat got the direct jump to West Michigan for his first minor-league assignment out of the University of Tennessee.

    Lipcius and Quintana help fill a need for advanced bats in the Tigers’ farm system.

    Registered as a third baseman in college, Lipcius has played second base with West Michigan, working a solid arm, clean hands and good instincts.

    He isn’t built for raw power at the plate but does feature an extra-base bat with some pop. Good hand-eye coordination and instincts have him on a solid start in the organization.

    17. Anthony Castro: RHP
    2019 Assignment: Double A
    Age: 24
    Height/weight: 6-2/190 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    After quietly biding his time at the lower levels of the Tigers’ farm system, Castro broke onto the scene in 2018 with a more confident secondary and 3-4 MPH added to his fastball velocity, tipping 97 on the radar gun.

    Mixing a fastball, curve and changeup, Castro’s maturity on the mound shows what he offers and how effective it can be.

    The 24-year-old has already worked a pair of outings with nine or more strikeouts, as well as holding opposing Double-A hitters to .181 at the plate.

    While Castro still needs some polish, there’s enough there for the Tigers to dream on for future rotation consideration in the next several years.

    18. Kody Clemens: 2B
    2019 Assignment: High A
    Age: 23
    Height/weight: 6-1/170 pounds
    Bats/throws: L/R

    Clemens got a quick jump to the Midwest League last season after his third-round selection in the 2018 draft. Over 52 games between West Michigan and Lakeland, he posted five home runs and slashed a combined .288/.365/.450.

    His return to the Florida State League has been sound defensively but he has struggled to gain consistent momentum at the plate. Clemens’ success at the University of Texas gave a good example of his instincts, but in turn displays how big of a transition there is between the college field and the minor leagues.

    The tell-tale sign for Clemens will be whether he can rebound at the plate. If that happens, it will give a better idea of his pace moving forward.

    19. Bryan Garcia: RHP
    2019 Assignments: High A/Double A/Triple A*
    Age: 24
    Height/weight: 6-1/203 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R
    (*High-A and Double-A were rehab assignments)

    With Tommy John surgery behind him, Garcia is finally in a position to get back on track after a whirlwind 2017 season launched him over four affiliates that ended in Triple-A.

    Garcia joined the organization as Detroit’s sixth-round pick out of the University of Miami in 2016. His fastball/slider/changeup mix has proven effective at all levels, but getting back to full strength has been the primary issue.

    Since his return to Toledo in May, Garcia has worked 13 scoreless outings in 17 appearances, allowing two or fewer earned runs in the other four appearances. Should he stay healthy, Garcia is pacing for the Tigers bullpen and pacing quickly.

    20. Bryant Packard: OF
    2019 Assignments: Short-season/Class A
    Age: 21
    Height/weight: 6-3/200 pounds
    Bats/throws: L/R

    Selected as a junior out of East Carolina in June, Packard adds an intriguing and polished bat to the Tigers’ farm system. He began to grab attention after slashing .406/.462/.671 as a college sophomore.

    Packard has raw power and is projected for 15-20 home runs down the road. With a below-average defensive profile overall, though, he will need to excel at the plate to advance in the system.

    [​IMG]
    Sergio Alcantara’s defense is strong but he must improve his hitting. (Reinhold Matay / USA TODAY Sports)
    21. Sergio Alcantara: SS
    2019 Assignment: Double A
    Age: 23
    Height/weight: 5-9/170 pounds
    Bats/throws: S/R

    Acquired from the Diamondbacks in a three-piece trade for J.D. Martinez, Alcantara has largely been considered the strongest shortstop in the organization. The only question was whether his bat could play at the higher levels.

    The switch-hitter exceeded expectations in 2018 with his first look at Double A, hitting .271 over 120 games against Eastern League pitching. He hasn’t found the same momentum at the plate this season, with a 4-point spike in his strikeout percentage.

    Defensively, Alcantara would likely be able to make the jump, but his bat needs to improve.

    22. Brock Deatherage: OF
    2019 Assignment: High A
    Age: 23
    Height/weight: 6-1/175 pounds
    Bats/throws: L/L

    Rated as one of the fastest in the organization, Deatherage hasn’t struggled to own the base path this season, but consistent contact has been a challenge.

    A senior sign out of N.C. State in 2018, Deatherage stole 19 bases over 60 games last season. He has nearly doubled that over 79 games in 2019, with 34 stolen bases.

    Deatherage originally grabbed headlines with an explosive debut in the GCL, but his return to the Florida State League this year hasn’t produced the same success. Deatherage’s approach has been jumpy since college and to overcome his nagging swing-and-miss, that approach needs to tighten up.

    23. Jacob Robson: OF
    2019 Assignment: Triple A
    Age: 24
    Height/weight: 5-10/180 pounds
    Bats: L/R

    Robson hopped on the radar last season with a surprising degree of pop at the plate and impressive work in the outfield after getting the call to Toledo to fill in for the injured Christin Stewart.

    He’s also a gritty defender, using his speed to balance out a below-average arm.

    Robson’s instinct on the bases makes him a genuine threat, but concern with his compact frame leads to questions about whether he’ll be able to keep pace with outfield competition.

    A solid option to come off the bench, Robson has plenty to offer, but his staying power at the major-league level remains a concern.

    24. Kingston Liniak: OF
    2019 Assignments: Short-season/Class A
    Age: 19
    Height/weight: 6-2/170 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    Liniak, selected in the fourth round of the 2018 draft, is more about future projection than current success in the minor-league system.

    He has a highly projectable body and despite being just 19, his instincts provide plenty to dream on.

    Liniak jumped three levels last summer. He began this season in the Midwest League, but struggles at the plate pushed him back to the New York-Penn League. Athleticism and advanced instincts still make him an interesting name to watch in the coming years as he irons out his swing and defensive routes.

    [​IMG]
    Gregory Soto has pitched 27.1 innings with the Tigers this season. (Jay Biggerstaff / USA TODAY Sports)
    25. Gregory Soto: LHP
    2019 Assignments: High A/Double A/Triple A/MLB
    Age: 24
    Height/weight: 6-1/240 pounds
    Bats: L/L

    It was no secret that the Tigers loved what Gregory Soto brought to the table. His plus fastball from the left side had grabbed attention at every level he worked, but lingering command issues created concern as to whether he would stick in the starting rotation.

    The Tigers weren’t deterred, however, inviting Soto to make his major-league debut in May.

    Since then, Soto has been recalled to Detroit several times. While he still lacks some confidence in his secondary, the fastball speaks for itself. It does, however, perform better in shorter stints, so a future post in the bullpen may be a consideration.

    26. Dustin Peterson: OF
    2019 Assignments: Triple A/MLB
    Age: 24
    Height/weight: 6-2/210 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    The Tigers took the chance on Peterson after the Braves chose to DFA Peterson in September 2018, and claimed him off waivers.

    Peterson got a 17-game stretch with Detroit this season, but he has spent the majority of his time with Triple-A Toledo. He plays off a long, raw power swing to add some pop to the Toledo lineup. He also, though, has a 29.8 strikeout percentage with the Mud Hens.

    He fits the role of a stable piece in the lineup but could face some competition as the outfield prospects continue to advance within the system.

    27. Eliezer Alfonzo: C
    2019 Assignment: Short-season
    Age: 19
    Height/weight: 5-10/155 pounds
    Bats/throws: S/R

    Still just 19, Alfonzo has been working his way through the Tigers farm system since 2016, but it wasn’t until last year that he started to break into conversation.

    He made his stateside debut in July 2018 after a stint in the Tigers’ Dominican Summer League, working through the GCL under first-year manager Brayan Pena before following Pena to Connecticut this season.

    Alfonzo has hit in 13 of 16 games with the short-season Tigers, with solid contact at the plate. His defensive profile isn’t flashy, but it’s advanced for his age and projected to add strength as he continues to develop physically.

    28. Cooper Johnson: C
    2019 Assignment: Short-season
    Age: 21
    Height/weight: 6-0/215 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    Johnson, selected in the sixth round of the 2019 draft, is still working to make a name for himself very early in his career with Detroit’s organization.

    Praised for his defensive abilities, Johnson improved at the plate in his final season at Ole Miss, but still is viewed as a light bat overall.

    Johnson works a plus-plus arm from behind the plate, allowing him to expertly manage the run game. Johnson’s plus athleticism could cover for him while he settles in against more advanced pitching.

    29. John Schreiber: RHP
    2019 Assignments: Double A/Triple A
    Age: 25
    Height/weight: 6-3/220 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    The Tigers have made it clear they have plans for Schreiber, despite inconsistencies over the last two years, and are giving him time to iron things out.

    He received a promotion to Toledo in late April to test his mix, but the results have been mixed. Schreiber’s fastball/slider combo is highly effective when on, but playing up the ladder, that combo has to be as sharp as possible to keep hitters off balance.

    I still expect the Tigers to give Schreiber a look out of the Detroit bullpen, but his mix needs to get tighter across the board to expedite his arrival.

    30. Hugh Smith: RHP
    2019 Assignment: Class A
    Age: 22
    Height/weight: 6-10/214 pounds
    Bats/throws: R/R

    Injury forced Smith to the sidelines in 2018, so the 6-10 right-hander didn’t get his first look at full-season baseball until this season with a jump to Class A West Michigan.

    He hasn’t had the strongest start to the year, but the opportunity to shake off rust is exactly what he needed.

    Boasting a plus fastball that has touched upward of 96 mph, Smith can mix his pitches, but what worked for him in college may need a reinvention to succeed against minor-league hitters.

    Smith still has a raw skill set, but his frame and velocity couple to make him a name worth watching.
     
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  31. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    Come on Avila make some trades, so I can bitch about you selling too soon, or getting a shitty return
     
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  32. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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  33. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    There goes any chance of trading Boyd, He has like a 6 ERA over his last 10 starts. Pathetic
     
  34. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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  35. MG2

    MG2 No judgement in brainstorming
    Donor

    Boyd is like the anti-Fulmer from 2 years ago, and yet we find ourselves in the same position with him as we were 2 years ago with Fulmer.

    Fulmer had an ERA all the peripheral stats said he couldn't keep up, and we had to decide if he was going to be one of those guys to keep or deal. He ended up getting hurt a bunch and the peripheral stuff was right. Boyd has peripheral numbers that suggest he can't keep giving up this many HRs, and if that happens he's going to be an extremely valuable pitcher for 3 years, but there are guys like him who just will always give up a bunch of HRs and that keeps them from being that kind of guy (and it's especially scary with this new baseball). I honestly have no clue how to value him if I was the Tigers or any other team right now in terms of a trade offer.
     
  36. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    Sell. Skubal is better
     
  37. MG2

    MG2 No judgement in brainstorming
    Donor

    Sell for what, though? It doesn't make sense to me to sell him if you're not getting at least one significant, impact bat in return. And I don't think that offer is going to be out there. I'm not really interested in trading a guy who is, at the very least, a valuable innings eater for the next three seasons for three lottery tickets or flawed guys who aren't likely to be impact players.
     
  38. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
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    We are now 1.5 behind the O’s baby. Also 4 games up from 3rd. LFG.
     
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  39. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    Sucks that the #1 pick next year is another pitcher though.
     
  40. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
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    I thought it was torkelson?
     
  41. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    Nah. You don’t take a college RH 1b first overall. It’s never been done
     
  42. Tug

    Tug Well-Known Member
    Donor
    Detroit LionsDetroit PistonsMichigan State Spartans

    Avila is a trend setter
     
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  43. MG2

    MG2 No judgement in brainstorming
    Donor

    This actually really intrigues me and makes some sense

     
  44. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
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    How Good Is Shane Greene?
    July 18th, 2019 at 8:53pm CST • By Connor Byrne
    With the Tigers mired in a rebuild and closer Shane Greene in his second-last year of team control, the right-hander ranks as one of baseball’s most obvious trade candidatesheading into the July 31 deadline. While little has gone right this year for Detroit, whose 29-62 record stands as the game’s second worst, Greene has been one of the team’s few bright lights. That’s especially encouraging for the Tigers considering they may be on the verge of dealing the All-Star to a contender.

    A Tiger since they acquired him from the Yankees in a noteworthy three-team trade entering the 2015 season, Greene’s tenure in the Motor City has been a mixed bag. He was subpar in his first year with the Tigers while mostly working as a starter, and has proved inconsistent as a reliever since then. Greene’s career has continued its up-and-down trajectory this season, but 2019 has checked in on the overwhelmingly positive side in terms of results. The 30-year-old owns a near-flawless 1.06 ERA in 34 innings, during which he has converted 22 of 24 saves. Greene has racked up those numbers on a reasonable $4MM salary, which should only add to his appeal for reliever-needy contenders.

    [​IMG]

    Chris McCosky of the Detroit News reported last week that interested clubs view Greene as more a setup man than a closer, despite the success he has enjoyed putting a bow on rare Detroit wins this year.

    The question is: Would an acquiring team be getting a real difference-maker in Greene? His ERA says yes, as do Greene’s 9.26 K/9, 2.65 BB/9, career-high 53.4 percent groundball rate and improved swinging-strike and contact rates. Furthermore, thanks in part to a personal-best 15.2 percent infield fly mark, Greene’s hard-contact rate against has tumbled from 37.5 percent last year to 27.3 this season. According to FanGraphs, just 11 relievers have yielded a lower hard-hit percentage than Greene.

    Statcast only places Greene in the league’s 49th percentile in the hard-hit department, though it assigns him far better reviews in the expected slugging percentage (67th), expected weighted on-base average (80th) and expected batting average (86th) categories. It also indicates Greene has made changes to his pitch mix compared to last year, having upped his cutter usage by almost 6 percent and thrown his slider 4 percent less. Greene’s slider hasn’t produced poor results, but his cutter and his main pitch – a sinker – have been particularly tough on opposing hitters. Thus far, they’ve managed sub-.200 wOBAs against the two. Those offerings have helped Greene stymie same-handed batters, who have logged a pitiful .170 wOBA against him, and also keep lefties at bay (.271).

    As effective as Greene has been in 2019, there are some red flags accompanying his performance. For one, his his velocity isn’t quite where it was in 2018. Beyond that, it appears Greene has benefited greatly from luck. ERA estimators FIP (3.66), xFIP (4.04) and SIERA (3.62) paint Greene as something closer to a useful reliever than a a true shutdown option, and the .179 batting average on balls in play he has surrendered to opposing hitters likely won’t hold. The number’s a whopping 125 points below Greene’s career norm (.304). Allowing less impactful contact has helped Greene sustain that figure to this point, granted, but it’s nevertheless a good bet to climb as the season progresses. Likewise, Greene’s 86.1 percent strand rate – which is a lofty 17-plus points higher than his usual (69.0) – may regress toward his lifetime mean over the next couple months. Plus, although Greene’s aforementioned xwOBA (.282) has among the league’s best, it’s still 66 points higher than the real wOBA he has given up (.216).

    It’s clear there are no shortage of reasons for optimism and pessimism in regards to Greene’s 2019 output. It’s also obvious Greene’s a capable major league reliever, though, and with another year of arbitration control left, he’ll be in demand around the deadline.
     
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  45. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    Greene hasn’t pitched in like 3 weeks
     
  46. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    The Indians wouldn’t do that trade either.
     
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  47. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    Skubal with 11 K’s through 5 innings. Probably done for night due to pitch count

     
  48. smeegsgreen

    smeegsgreen Big fan of Koalas
    Michigan State SpartansDetroit LionsLos Angeles ChargersDetroit Red WingsDetroit Tigers

    He’s our new Boyd

    Zimmermann should retire. He’s made enough money playing like shit
     
  49. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    He pitched one more inning. Just an FYI, but I said he was the next Clayton Kershaw two weeks ago

     
  50. Vinegar Strokes

    Vinegar Strokes Suck our Dicks. Fire Everybody
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    Embrace the tank baby. I hope Zimmerman plays rest of year
     
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