Global Warming Debunked Again

Discussion in 'The Mainboard' started by TheChatch, Apr 25, 2015.

  1. steamengine

    steamengine I don’t want to press one for English!
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  2. tmbrules

    tmbrules Make America Great Again!
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    Tobias

    Odd how they would build the worlds largest mall in a city that won’t be there in 10 years.

    Moron.
     
  3. Fuzzy Zoeller

    Fuzzy Zoeller College football > NFL

    Let's go ahead and shut the thread down, boys. Rules has us again.
     
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  4. Tobias

    Tobias dan “the man qb1” jones fan account
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    he shouldnt be allowed to post until he pays me the $1million he owes me
     
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  5. soulfly

    soulfly Well-Known Member
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    So amazing :roll:
     
  6. bro

    bro Hey Hermano
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    :roll: :roll: :roll:
     
  7. Prospector

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    to be heard later today if report gets any attention: This is very good news. As you know, many areas of America are suffering drought conditions.
     
  8. soulfly

    soulfly Well-Known Member
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    You're such a weird person.
     
  9. tmbrules

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    Look you little queer, you weren’t man enough to bet on your dumbass claim that Miami wouldn’t exist in 20 years. You wouldn’t be able to pay anyway, you are 30 and still have roommates.

    This is exactly why no one believes in the scam the left calls Global Warming.
     
  10. Lyrtch

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    yikes
     
  11. fsudan

    fsudan Well-Known Member
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    You triggered, fag?
     
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  12. NCHusker88

    NCHusker88 We named our yam Pam. It rhymed.
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    Apparently "scientific consensus" is now equivalent to "the left"

    Good to know
     
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  13. nofatchildren

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    Quit fagging up every thread, fag.
     
  14. fsudan

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    This thread was plenty gay when I got here
     
  15. duc15

    duc15 Hey Nong Man
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    The right doesn’t believe in science so it makes sense
     
  16. cutig

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    The world is now the left. Must have a pretty sad life to feel so persecuted.
     
  17. Bruce Wayne

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  18. infected donkey

    infected donkey Arkansas Razorbacks
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    This works great for their part of the country, arizona and new mexico should do the same thing.
     
  19. BP

    BP Bout to Regulate.
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    Not with the GOP in control of the govt.
     
  20. Prospector

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    Coal $100 kwh
    Solar $50 kwh
     
  21. infected donkey

    infected donkey Arkansas Razorbacks
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    Solar works great at night.
     
  22. Bruce Wayne

    Bruce Wayne Billionaire Playboy
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    The next thing Elon Musk should invent is a device capable of storing excess energy created by solar panels so that a house could be completely unreliant on the electric grid, or that could be scaled up for use by utility companies.

    You might be on to something here man
     
  23. Biff Bridges

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    Checkmate, libs.
     
  24. Arkadin

    Arkadin inefficiently efficent and unclearly clear
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    I have numerous solar powered lights whose entire purpose is to work at night. Mission accomplished :smugdog:
     
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  25. Prospector

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    Republican Member of Congress Tells Scientists Rising Sea Level Caused by More Dirt on Ocean Floor
    By Jonathan Chait@jonathanchait

    [​IMG]
    Mo Brooks, mo’ problems. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc.
    Yesterday, the House Science Committee held a hearing on “Using Technology to Address Climate Change.” The debate quickly ran aground on the question of whether climate change is being caused by increases in greenhouse gas emissions, as climate scientists believe, or whether the entire theory has been falsified by an international scientific cabal in service of a secret agenda to extend government control of the economy, as most Republicans believe.

    A normal person would hesitate to engage in a scientific debate on this question with a professionally trained scientist. But since many Republicans believe the entire theory of anthropogenic global warming has been falsified, they assume they can refute it with simple personal observations, such as, “If average global temperatures are rising, why is there snow in February?”

    Representative Mo Brooks brought his distinct analytical contribution to the debate by trying to prove to Philip Duffy, Ph.D., a former senior adviser in the White House National Science and Technology Council, that the sea-level rise might have causes other than the warming of the ocean and melting land ice caused by warmer temperatures. Brooks began his inquisition by asserting, “Ever since human beings have been on the planet, sea levels have risen.” Duffy explained that sea levels have in fact fluctuated since humans appeared on the planet, and that warmer air was the driver of this change.

    Brooks wasn’t buying it. “Let’s assume for a moment that what you’re talking about has some kind of factual, rational basis for it, that ice has melted. Are there other factors?,” he asked. Brooks proceeded to explain that rivers carry dirt into the sea, causing the sea level to rise, leading to this surreal exchange.

    Brooks: “Every time you have that soil or rock deposited into the seas, that causes the sea level to rise, because now you’ve got less space in those oceans, because the bottom is moving up.”

    Duffy: “I’m pretty sure that —”

    Brooks: “What about the white cliffs of Dover, California, where time and time again you’re having the waves crash against the shorelines, and time and time again, you’re having the cliffs crash into the sea. All that displaces water, which forces it to rise, does it not?”

    Duffy: “I’m pretty sure that on human time scale those are minuscule effects.”

    Scientists believe the accelerated rise in sea levels of the last century is caused by the rising temperatures of the last century. On the other hand, maybe Brooks is right that people are just kicking more rocks into the ocean. There’s no way to tell!

    :trumpanzee:
     
  26. NCHusker88

    NCHusker88 We named our yam Pam. It rhymed.
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    Counterpoint: Earth just had its 400th straight warmer-than-average month thanks to global warming

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news...secutive-warm-month/618484002/?csp=chromepush
     
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  27. Prospector

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  28. PSU12

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  29. Mister Me Too

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    [​IMG]
     
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  30. BP

    BP Bout to Regulate.
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  31. Prospector

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    really surprised that this was printed in AL.com

    There's more to modern climate change theory than rocks
    Updated May 28, 6:47 AM; Posted May 26

    By Lee Roop

    [email protected]

    North Alabama Congressman Mo Brooks' attempt to implicate falling rocks and erosion in rising sea levels dominated the national headlines, but there was more interesting news from last week's now-famous congressional hearing and those who took part.
    For starters, none of the expert witnesses called by either Republicans or Democrats dispute that global warming is real. Or that humans caused it by burning fossil fuels. Or that humans can and need to do something about it.

    "There was less disagreement than I expected," Dr. Philip Duffy said afterward. Duffy is the director of the Woods Hole Research Center who got into the much-viewed exchange with Brooks. Watch it below.


    Rep. Brooks' Q&A on "Using Technology to Address Climate Change"
    "Both of the Republican witnesses accept not only the reality of climate change, the human cause of climate change and the need to do something," Duffy said in an interview later. "They were prepared to have a conversation from that starting point. Unfortunately, it didn't work out that way."

    Here are key points those witnesses made in their opening remarks.

    "Mitigation as well as adaptation is an important part of addressing climate change," said Oren Cass of the Manhattan Institute. If the climate changes gradually, Cass said, "it will impose real costs which we can manage."

    Cass also said that projecting the consequences of climate change without taking into account the possible responses by society isn't realistic. People can act and those actions will make a difference, he said.

    Ted Nordhaus of the Breakthrough Institute said global warming is "a well-established scientific consensus." Temperatures are rising, Nordhaus agreed, and the increase is "caused in significant part by greenhouse gases caused by internal combustion engines" It's real, the source is human activity, and the "consequences are hard to quantify but could be catastrophic," he said.

    "Climate change is a funny, funny problem," Duffy said in the interview several days after the hearing. "It's hard to wrap your mind around it."

    There are a couple of reasons for that, Duffy said. First, an increase of 2 degrees in temperature doesn't sound so bad. It happens all the time outside. "But globally, it's very, very different," he said. "Globally, a 2-degree temperature increase really is a big, big deal and very, very unusual."

    "That's hard to grasp," Duffy said. "And the urgency is hard to grasp."

    Also, "normal" environmental problems often have a "point source" like a pollutant going into water. "If you shut off the pollutant," Duffy said, "the system cleans itself up quickly."

    Climate change is different, he said. The main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, has a long life in the atmosphere. "We've done simulations that show if we were to totally and completely stop emitting greenhouse gases, which of course we're not going to do," Duffy said, "the temperature would not drop for hundreds of years. It's kind of locked in."

    The other big deal is "global ice," Duffy said.

    "Antarctica was discussed, and those ice sheets are shrinking," he said. "They're disintegrating and that disintegration is accelerating. And that drives sea level rise."

    That melting land ice and the thermal expansion of sea water are the major causes of sea level rise, Duffy said. Thermal expansion means water expands or increases in volume as it heats up

    What worries scientists like Duffy is if global warming increases enough to melt the ice covering most of Greenland. "If Greenland melts, that's like 23 feet of sea level rise," Duffy said. "Nobody thinks Greenland is going to melt in the next year or even in the next 10 years, or probably even in the next 100 years."

    "But what might happen is we might cross the threshold where that becomes inevitable and unstoppable," Duffy said. "So that's another reason for the urgency. We don't want that to happen. We suspect we're pretty close to that threshold of warming already."

    (Updated May 28, 2018 at 6:45 a.m. to correct the name of Dr. Duffy's research center, the Woods Hole Research Center.)

    good lord had never watched tho whole exchange. Big Mo must get his talking points from Rush and message boards and thinks he is doing such a good job. smh
    Comments are mostly what you would expect from citizens of Alabama
     
  32. Bruce Wayne

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  33. Hoss Bonaventure

    Hoss Bonaventure Don’t touch the bike
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    Goddamn rocks and their damn falling!
     
  34. Prospector

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    NYT's take on the report
    Antarctica Is Melting Three Times as Fast as a Decade Ago
    The continent’s rate of ice loss is speeding up, which is contributing even more to rising sea levels.
    By Kendra Pierre-Louis

    • June 13, 2018
    Between 60 and 90 percent of the world’s fresh water is frozen in the ice sheets of Antarctica, a continent roughly the size of the United States and Mexico combined. If all that ice melted, it would be enough to raise the world’s sea levels by roughly 200 feet.

    While that won’t happen overnight, Antarctica is indeed melting, and a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature shows that the melting is speeding up.
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    By The New York Times | Source: Ice Sheet Mass Balance Inter-comparison Exercise

    The rate at which Antarctica is losing ice has tripled since 2007, according to the latest available data. The continent is now melting so fast, scientists say, that it will contribute six inches (15 centimeters) to sea-level rise by 2100. That is at the upper end of what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has estimated Antarctica alone could contribute to sea level rise this century.

    Advertisement

    “Around Brooklyn you get flooding once a year or so, but if you raise sea level by 15 centimeters then that’s going to happen 20 times a year,” said Andrew Shepherd, a professor of earth observation at the University of Leeds and the lead author of the study.

    Even under ordinary conditions, Antarctica’s landscape is perpetually changing as icebergs calve, snow falls and ice melts on the surface, forming glacial sinkholes known as moulins. But what concerns scientists is the balance of how much snow and ice accumulates in a given year versus the amount that is lost.

    You have 2 free articles remaining.

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    Between 1992 and 2017, Antarctica shed three trillion tons of ice. This has led to an increase in sea levels of roughly three-tenths of an inch, which doesn’t seem like much. But 40 percent of that increase came from the last five years of the study period, from 2012 to 2017.

    Antarctica is not the only contributor to sea level rise. Greenland lost an estimated 1 trillion tons of ice between 2011 and 2014. And as oceans warm, their waters expand and occupy more space, also raising sea levels. The melting ice and warming waters have all been primarily driven by human emissions of greenhouse gases.
    Image[​IMG]
    Sea ice and a small stretch of open water where the Venable Ice Shelf meets Farwell Island in Antarctica.CreditJohn Sonntag/NASA
    The study also helps clear up some uncertainty that was linked to regional differences in Antarctica. West Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula, which reaches toward South America, have been known for some time to be losing ice. In East Antarctica the picture has been muddled as the ice sheet there gained mass in some years and lost mass in others.

    East Antarctica has sometimes been a focus of attention for people who deny the science of global warming. “A lot of the argument has been made from stakeholders that are not quite as interested in dealing with climate change that the East Antarctic ice sheet is actually gaining mass — therefore we don’t need to worry,” said Michele Koppes, a glaciologist at the University of British Columbia who was not involved with the study.

    East Antarctica, which makes up two-thirds of the continent, is a remote region of an already remote location, where data is scarcer because there are fewer measurement stations, Dr. Koppes said. Researchers must extrapolate a smaller amount of data over an area the size of the United States, which can make the analysis less precise.

    To get around those problems in this study, more than 80 researchers from around the world collected data from about a dozen different satellite measurements dating to the early 1990s.

    “We used different satellite missions and techniques because the various approaches we have at arriving at this number have different strengths and weaknesses,” Dr. Shepherd said. “And we find that by combining all of the available measurements we can iron out the problems that individual techniques have.”
    ..The researchers concluded that the changes in East Antarctica were not nearly enough to make up for the rapid loss seen in West Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula. Antarctica is, on balance, losing its ice sheets and raising the world’s sea levels.

    my apologies, the graph wouldn't copy paste correctly
     
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  35. bro

    bro Hey Hermano
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  36. Prospector

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    Japan's Record-Breaking Heat Wave Declared Natural Disaster, 80 Dead
    [​IMG]A hot day in Tokyo. (Photo: Paul Keller / Flickr)

    LORRAINE CHOW OF ECOWATCH ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

    Article reprinted with permission from EcoWatch

    Hot, dry and fiery conditions are being seen by many parts of the globe right now. This includes Japan, where the nation's meteorological agency just declared the extreme heat a "natural disaster."

    An agency spokesman said that "unprecedented levels of heat" were being felt, as quoted by AFP.

    The city of Kumagaya, located about 40 miles northwest of Tokyo, even broke the country's all-time record when it reached 106 degrees Fahrenheit on Monday. The previous record was 105.8 degrees, set on Aug. 12, 2013 in the town of Ekawasaki.

    The ongoing heatwave "is fatal, and we recognize it as a natural disaster," the weather agency spokesman added.

    BuzzFlash isn't funded by ads or subscription revenue, but by readers like you. Can you help sustain us by making a tax-deductible donation now?

    Preliminary government data shows that the heatwave caused 65 deaths from July 16-22. Another 22,647 people were also sent to hospitals with heat stroke symptoms. Both of the figures are the highest for one week since record-keeping began in 2008, according to the Asahi Shimbun.

    As of Tuesday, Fire and Disaster Management Agency said a total of 80 people have died from the heat since the beginning of July, and more than 35,000 have been hospitalized, AFP reported.

    Japan's meteorological agency expects that temperatures will continue to be 95 degrees and higher into August, USA TODAY reported. Officials advised people to stay hydrated, stay indoors, use air conditioning and avoid direct sunlight.

    The sweltering conditions come not long after historic flooding and mudslides killed more than 220 people in western and central Japan.

    As EcoWatch previously mentioned, that weather disaster fell in line with government predictions for the impact of climate change on Japan. A 2012 report found that global warming could increase the risk of flooding and landslide disasters due to heavy rain.

    "I've felt the seasons change about 20 days earlier than usual, and the rainy season also ended much earlier. It must be global warming," a Japanese woman commented to AFP's cameras.
     
  37. burnttatertot

    burnttatertot The Execution Protocol
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    Japan weak, Taiwan #1.
     
  38. Prospector

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    Two dead as raging California wildfire spreads near city


    Jul 27th 2018 9:56AM

    REDDING, Calif., July 27 (Reuters) - At least two firefighters have died fighting a fast-growing wildfire that sent residents fleeing from the northern Californian city of Redding, where homes and businesses burned and power was cut on Friday, fire officials said.

    The Shasta County Carr Fire grew by about 60 percent overnight, scorching 44,450 acres (18,000 hectares), state fire officials said.

    Fire officials on Friday said the blaze killed a second firefighter, after earlier claiming the life of one operating a bulldozer. It was just 3 percent contained and threatened almost 500 homes and businesses, state officials.



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    It has moved east from the communities of Whiskeytown and Shasta and crossed the Sacramento River to threaten the city of Redding, home to 90,000 people. Fire officials said the mechanical failure of a vehicle sparked the blaze on Monday.

    Winds were forecast to reach speeds of 25 miles (40 km) per hour, with temperatures reaching 110 Fahrenheit (43 Celsius), conditions that could fan the flames further.

    "When you're dealing with temperatures that high, it's really, really hot heat," said Cal Fire spokesman Scott Kenney in a phone interview. "Stress, as far as heat exhaustion and heat stroke, are really serious situations that a firefighter can get into, so the tactics kind of get hindered by temperatures that high."

    The Carr Fire is one of 88 burning nationally, mostly across the American west, one of which prompted the closure of much of Yosemite National Park.

    This year so far, almost 4 million acres (1.6 million hectares) have been blackened by wildfires, above a 10-year average of 3.6 million acres (1.5 million hectares) over the same period, according to the National Interagency Fire Center.

    Cal Fire officials were not available to provide details about the injuries to civilians and firefighters, or how much damage the blaze had caused.

    Roads out of the city, about 150 miles (240 km) north of Sacramento, were jammed overnight with motorists trying to escape the flames, social media postings showed. (Additional reporting by Brendan O'Brien in Milwaukee and Makini Brice in Washington; Editing by Scott Malone and Bernadette Baum)

    'Historically unprecedented summer heat' will no longer be unprecedented.

    [​IMG]

    Writing in the most recent issue of Nature Climate Change, lead author Andrew King and colleagues inform us that the data tell us a grim story of rising temperatures, even if we somehow avoid the worst case scenarios for carbon combustion induced heating of the planet:

    On average, in the simulated 1.5oC [increase over current] world, 90 million people (or 11% of the estimated 2010 population of the continent) are exposed to hot summers beyond the observed record (that is, half of the summers would have more than 90 million people exposed to historically unprecedented summer average temperatures). (pg. 550)

    The exposure of populations to historically unprecedented summer heat increases dramatically even at the relatively low global warming levels of the Paris Agreement. (pg. 550)

    Few of us realize the scope of the public health effects caused by these extreme heat events, but they are dramatic. As Scientific American reports:

    Researchers believe that global warming is already responsible for some 150,000 deaths each year around the world, and fear that the number may well double by 2030 even if we start getting serious about emissions reductions today.

    A team of health and climate scientists from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the University of Wisconsin at Madison published these findings last year in the prestigious, peer-reviewed science journal Nature. Besides killing people, global warming also contributes to some five million human illnesses every year, the researchers found. Some of the ways global warming negatively affects human health—especially in developing nations—include: speeding the spread of infectious diseases such as malaria and dengue fever; creating conditions that lead to potentially fatal malnutrition and diarrhea; and increasing the frequency and severity of heat waves, floods and other weather-related disasters.

    How bad will this get? According to the World Health Organization:

    Between 2030 and 2050, climate change is expected to cause approximately 250 000 additional deaths per year, from malnutrition, malaria, diarrhoea and heat stress.

    The only rational response is to discontinue the use of carbon combustion, and begin massive mitigation efforts globally.

    Of course, no one would accuse the GOP (currently in control of the federal government of two-thirds of the states) of being rational:

    After receiving billions in tax cuts at the end of last year, oil and gas companies can expect another year of record-breaking profits. While Exxon alone received $5.9 billion in tax breaks, companies that do oil exploration can expect an additional $190 billion in profits. And yesterday, the second-largest coal company in the country, Arch Coal, announced the new tax plan would lower their tax rate to “effectively zero.” To pay for these giveaways, the Trump budget proposes cutting several programs that enforce pollution laws, fund clean energy innovation, and protect outdoor places. Trump’s cuts effectively subsidize oil, gas, and coal companies, severely hamper renewable energy growth, all while weakening protections for public health and the outdoors.
     
    #1738 Prospector, Jul 27, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2018
  39. timo

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  41. cutig

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    Yeah but it snowed in Oklahoma checkmate lib
     
  42. TC

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    Is hurricane season gonna be wild this year :ohdear:
     
  43. timo

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  44. laxjoe

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  45. bro

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  46. soulfly

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    TheChatch

    I’m going on two years in a row of smoky ass skies in my town after this shit never happening in my family’s near 40 years in the valley.

    You’re probably aware there are 75 orcas, in total, left in the southern pods. One of the juvenile Js is starving to death (same pod with the dead calf) and the Lummi tribe is trying to figure out if they can hand feed it.

    Sockeye and chinook salmon fishing has been closed in the Columbia because the Yakima is too warm (80 degrees versus the required 73 degrees) for fish to migrate and spawn.

    California has the largest wildfire roaring in recorded state history.

    Also, NYT magazine published an entire ‘zine dedicated to this topic:

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/08/01/magazine/climate-change-losing-earth.html

    Thoughts? I’ll hand deliver it if you would prefer to read it in hard copy format.
     
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  47. BP

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  48. Prospector

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    Heatwave thaws Swiss glacier, uncovering a crashed war plane hidden for 72 years
    The Telegraph
    Abby Young-Powell


    August 15, 2018 9:55 AM EDT

    A Second World War plane that crash-landed in Switzerland has been uncovered after 72 years, thanks to the recent heatwave.

    The American C-53 Skytrooper, a military transport plane also known as a Dakota, was flying from Tulln in Austria to the Italian city of Pisa on November 18 1946 when a snowstorm forced it to crash-land onto the Gauli Glacier in the Bernese Alps at a speed of around 174mph. It is thought that rough weather had led the pilots to take a detour and fly via Munich, Strasbourg and Marseille, rather than cross the Alps.

    All those on board, which included eight passengers and four crew members, were rescued five days after the crash by Swiss ski soldiers, who were alerted to the accident by an emergency radio message.

    However, the plane itself has remained hidden in the glacier, buried under deep layers of snow and ice — until now.

    Unusually warm weather in Switzerland has meant experts have for the first time been able to uncover large parts of the aircraft. Among the debris are objects such as wings and propellers, as well as items found inside, such as tin cans, hangers and spoons.

    Adriano Boschetti, an archaeologist who works for the Canton of Bern, said Americans had already shown a lot of interest in the historic objects.

    A local owner of a nearby mountain hut has been asked to keep watch and make sure parts of the plane are not destroyed or stolen.

    “The wreck is a great folk tale,” the mountain hut owner said. “We have many visitors coming to us solely for the sake of the Dakota.”

    Temperatures have risen to more than 35 C in parts of Switzerland in recent months, as the country has experienced one of the hottest and driest summers since records began in 1864. Temperatures have soared across Europe this summer, with many unusual side effects. Zoos in France have been giving banana ice cubes to gorillas. In Italy, cows have been producing 15 per cent less milk, owing to the dry grass, while in Germany, gherkin farmers have struggled to reap crops.

    Swiss scientists have warned that many glaciers will have disappeared from the Alps by 2050. The Aletsch Glacier, which is the biggest in the Alps, will almost disappear by the end of the century, they have warned.
     
  49. BP

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  50. BudKilmer

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    I wonder if TheChatch ever reads this thread and feels dumb
     
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