Global Warming Debunked Again

Discussion in 'The Mainboard' started by TheChatch, Apr 25, 2015.

  1. Hoss Bonaventure

    Hoss Bonaventure Don’t touch the bike
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    He reads it, swirls his glass of scotch (old and expensive of course), scoffs, then gives a hearty guffaw.
     
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  2. tmbrules

    tmbrules Make America Great Again!
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    I’ll answer for him.

    No. Climate change remains the biggest scam of our lifetime.
     
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  3. cutig

    cutig My name is Rod, and I like to party
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    :roll:
     
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  4. TwoPoor

    TwoPoor You gotta know your limits with a boombox
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    Can't top trickle down
     
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  5. PSU12

    PSU12 The Grand Experiment
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    Most of central/ eastern PA had the wettest summer ever. It’s rained damn near every day in New Jersey this summer. Lots of flooding.
     
  6. tmbrules

    tmbrules Make America Great Again!
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    Trickle down has created the worlds greatest economy.
     
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  7. tmbrules

    tmbrules Make America Great Again!
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    Definitely global warming. It’s responsible for the droughts and the rain. The snow and the heat.
     
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  8. NCHusker88

    NCHusker88 We named our yam Pam. It rhymed.
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  9. tmbrules

    tmbrules Make America Great Again!
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    Where does the Nobel prize winning physicist claiming that climate science is a pseudo science fit on your cute little graph there?
     
  10. cutig

    cutig My name is Rod, and I like to party
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    Yes because one physicist who admitted to not knowing much about climatology says it’s fake means it’s fake. Good try.
     
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  11. NCHusker88

    NCHusker88 We named our yam Pam. It rhymed.
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    Much further to the right than you hth
     
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  12. bro

    bro Hey Hermano
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  13. SenatorClayDavis

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    Must be lots of solar flare activity or whatever going on.
     
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  14. Prospector

    Prospector I am not a new member
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    Not just land heat waves: Oceans are in hot water, too

    [​IMG]
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Even the oceans are breaking temperature records in this summer of heat waves.

    Off the San Diego coast, scientists earlier this month recorded all-time high seawater temperatures since daily measurements began in 1916.

    “Just like we have heat waves on land, we also have heat waves in the ocean,” said Art Miller of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

    Between 1982 and 2016, the number of “marine heat waves” roughly doubled, and likely will become more common and intense as the planet warms, a study released Wednesday found. Prolonged periods of extreme heat in the oceans can damage kelp forests and coral reefs, and harm fish and other marine life.

    “This trend will only further accelerate with global warming,” said Thomas Frolicher, a climate scientist at the University of Bern in Switzerland, who led the research.

    His team defined marine heat waves as extreme events in which sea-surface temperatures exceeded the 99th percentile of measurements for a given location. Because oceans both absorb and release heat more slowly than air, most marine heat waves last for at least several days — and some for several weeks, said Frolicher.

    “We knew that average temperatures were rising. What we haven’t focused on before is that the rise in the average comes at you in clumps of very hot days — a shock of several days or weeks of very high temperatures,” said Michael Oppenheimer, a Princeton University climate scientist who was not involved in the study.

    Many sea critters have evolved to survive within a fairly narrow band of temperatures compared to creatures on land, and even incremental warming can be disruptive.

    Some free-swimming sea animals like bat rays or lobsters may shift their routines. But stationary organisms like coral reefs and kelp forests “are in real peril,” said Michael Burrows, an ecologist at the Scottish Marine Institute, who was not part of the research.

    In 2016 and 2017, persistent high ocean temperatures off eastern Australia killed off as much as half of the shallow water corals of the Great Barrier Reef — with significant consequences for other creatures dependent upon the reef.

    “One in every four fish in the ocean lives in or around coral reefs,” said Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, a marine biologist at the University of Queensland. “So much of the ocean’s biodiversity depends upon a fairly small amount of the ocean floor.”

    The latest study in Nature relied on satellite data and other records of sea-surface temperatures including from ships and buoys.

    It didn’t include the recent record-breaking measurements off Scripps Pier in San Diego — which reached 79.5 degrees Fahrenheit on August 9 — but Frolicher and Miller said the event was an example of a marine heat wave.

    Miller said he knew something was odd when he spotted a school of bat rays — which typically only congregate in pockets of warm water — swimming just off the pier earlier this month.

    Changes in ocean circulation associated with warmer surface waters will likely mean decreased production of phytoplankton — the tiny organisms that form the basis of the marine food web, he said.

    Marine biologists nicknamed a patch of persistent high temperatures in the Pacific Ocean between 2013 and 2016 “the Blob.” During that period, decreased phytoplankton production led to a cascading lack of food for many species, causing thousands of California sea lion pups to starve, said Miller, who had no role in the Nature study.

    “We’ve repeatedly set new heat records. It’s not surprising, but it is shocking,” he said.
     
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  15. swiggs

    swiggs white skill player
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    We might just have to go back to the oceans being giant hot tubs like in the dinosaur age
     
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  16. Guns

    Guns yeah, but what about antifa?
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  17. Shawn Hunter

    Shawn Hunter ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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  18. MORBO!

    MORBO! Hello, Tiny Man. I WILL DESTROY YOU!!!!
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    Buy property near the properties that are near the water. Wait a few years and boom, you have water front property.
     
  19. HuskerInMiami

    HuskerInMiami Well-Known Member
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    It’s king tides.
     
  20. The Banks

    The Banks TMB's Alaskan
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    This post sums up your ignorance on the subject
     
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  21. The Banks

    The Banks TMB's Alaskan
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    The guy who was forced out of the American Physical Society for his non-statistics based stance on climate change as well as being a member of the notably laugh worthy Heartland Institute, the same institute that denies the risks of secondhand smoke, is against public smoking bans, is for Betsy DeVos' charter school programs, believes in free-market environmentalism, and generally does not understand the scientific method.
     
  22. JeremyLambsFace

    JeremyLambsFace For bookings contact Morgan at 702-374-3735
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    CAPTAIN AMERICA!?
     
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  23. tmbrules

    tmbrules Make America Great Again!
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    Its a scam.

    News flash - the earth changes over time.
     
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  24. fsudan

    fsudan Well-Known Member
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    Al Gore is a fucking genius. A complete idiot, but a genius
     
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  25. Popovio

    Popovio The poster formerly known as "MouseCop"
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    I mean, I knew the two of you were stupid cunts, but I underestimated the depth of your willful ignorance.
     
  26. BellottiBold

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    Benefiting big enviro?
    Big academia?
    Fucking kill yourself you brainless turd.
     
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  27. fsudan

    fsudan Well-Known Member
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    Hahaha what a fucking spaz
     
  28. Talking Head

    Talking Head The Bag Man
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    It’s not a scam.

    Y’all would do yourself a world of good to admit that greenhouse gases are causing global warming, but shutting down the world economy to try to combat it isn’t gonna happen.

    Investing a shitload of federal dollars in green energy and CO2 conversion is the best route to resolve this problem.
     
    Vito Corleone likes this.
  29. Guns

    Guns yeah, but what about antifa?
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    no shit.

    it's the speed at which it changes that's the problem.
     
  30. Prospector

    Prospector I am not a new member
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  31. Talking Head

    Talking Head The Bag Man
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    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/...n-cleanup-plastic-pacific-garbage-patch-news/
    [​IMG]
     
  32. tmbrules

    tmbrules Make America Great Again!
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    But global warming is real yo.

    I would also like to thank global warming for slowing Florence down just before she hit the coast.
     
  33. The Banks

    The Banks TMB's Alaskan
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    Taking pride in one’s own stupidity. Sad
     
    Guns likes this.
  34. timo

    timo you'll be fine at the end of the line
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  35. timo

    timo you'll be fine at the end of the line
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  36. The Banks

    The Banks TMB's Alaskan
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    The runaway positive feedback loop for greenhouse gas emissions, especially methane, which is about 100x stronger than carbon dioxide in regards to global warming, it’s pretty scary.
     
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  37. Prospector

    Prospector I am not a new member
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    Natural Disasters
    Navy Leaders Need to Better Prepare for Climate Change, Experts Say
    Flooding from Florence, exacerbated by sea level rise, demonstrates the vulnerability of military infrastructure


    [​IMG]
    Boat dock destroyed by Hurricane Florence winds on September 13, 2018 in Atlantic Beach, NC. Credit: Chip Somodevilla Getty Images
    While Hurricane Florence was still barreling toward the East Coast, the Navy shipped its vessels out of harm’s way.

    But the sailors had another problem: What would happen to their cars parked back at base if Florence hit coastal Virginia?

    While Florence largely steered clear of the cars parked at the naval base in Hampton Roads, Va., the episode was emblematic of the type of cascading problems that planners will increasingly have to take into account. That type of trickle-down issue illustrates the gaps in planning for climate change, Ann Phillips, a retired Navy rear admiral, said yesterday at a panel on how climate change will challenge military and civilian infrastructure.

    “In the Navy, we don’t value or fund infrastructure,” said Phillips, a board member of the Center for Climate and Security think tank, which hosted the panel to highlight the second edition of its report on the most vulnerable military sites. “We like stuff. We don’t like infrastructure.”

    The military might be even less prepared than some coastal cities, panelists said. The same officials might run a city for a few years, giving them time to notice the effects of climate change and get adaptation programs running. But most regions get a new commander every two years or so.

    That’s been the case in Hampton Roads, the southeastern region of Virginia that hosts a large Navy base along with several other military sites.

    A commander who prioritized climate change policies was followed by one who did not, Phillips said.

    “An excellent officer, a fine gentleman, has never been to Hampton Roads before, can’t spell sea-level rise,” she said. “[That] doesn’t stop anything that’s going on, but it’s just not their No. 1 priority.”

    The military has been working on climate risks for years. Phillips pointed to a software project with NASA, now part of the larger Adapt Virginia portal, that she said is helping reduce flood damages from hundreds of millions of dollars to hundreds of thousands.

    Such work is expected to continue, in part due to a provision in the military spending bill that allows the Department of Defense to fund adaptation projects outside the fence line of bases, said David Titley, a retired Navy rear admiral who now teaches at Pennsylvania State University.

    “There’s lip service, and then there’s doing, sorta, some things—actually more than you would expect—more than you would expect from the White House tweets, I’ll put it that way,” he said.

    Florence offered coastal communities a preview of their long-term flood risk from sea-level rise. But in the short term, experts said, it’s unrealistic to assume people will change their behavior based on one storm.

    Susan Cohen, a Navy biologist, said a real estate agent she knows in the vulnerable area of Topsail Beach, N.C., closed on a house the same day that Florence was making landfall.

    “We make these crazy decisions, but we live in paradise [and] we don’t want to leave,” she said. “And then we have storms like this, and we’re all going to cash our federal insurance checks.”

    Study quantifies sea-level-rise damages from Florence
    Meanwhile, the First Street Foundation, a nonprofit research organization, yesterday released an analysis showing that sea-level rise off the Carolina coast contributed to storm surge flooding of 11,000 more homes than would have been inundated under similar storm conditions in 1970.

    The finding is based on geospatial analysis of Florence’s storm surge across the Carolina coast in 2018 compared with 1970, when average sea levels were 6 inches lower than today.

    Overall, the scientists found that Florence’s storm surge affected more than 51,000 homes and buildings by pushing seawater over at least 25 percent of each property. But that number would have been only 40,000 properties under sea-level conditions 48 years ago, and possibly as few as 23,000 properties when factoring for the growth in residential and commercial development since 1970.

    “Even though the impact of Hurricane Florence continues to be felt, we already know that sea-level rise has made the damage significantly worse, as observed with other recent storms,” said Steven McAlpine, First Street’s head of data science.

    The analysis further found that under an Army Corps of Engineers-projected 15 inches of sea-level rise by 2050, Florence’s storm surge would have been nearly twice as destructive, damaging an estimated 102,000 homes and businesses.

    “With sea levels and coastal development on the rise, the impacts of hurricane storm surge will only get worse,” said the group’s executive director, Matthew Eby. “The time to rethink America’s sea-level rise and adaptation strategy is now.”

    Reprinted from Climatewire with permission from E&E News. E&E provides daily coverage of essential energy and environmental news at www.eenews.net.
     
  38. Lyrtch

    Lyrtch My second favorite meat is hamburger
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    we went from "fake news" to "its too late" in a hurry

     
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  39. MORBO!

    MORBO! Hello, Tiny Man. I WILL DESTROY YOU!!!!
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    This is infuriating
     
  40. Prospector

    Prospector I am not a new member
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  41. Arkadin

    Arkadin inefficiently efficent and unclearly clear
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  42. Prospector

    Prospector I am not a new member
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    um I don't.
     
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  43. timo

    timo you'll be fine at the end of the line
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  44. wes tegg

    wes tegg I'm a Guy's guy, guys. #AioliBoys
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    I'm flying into Providence tomorrow. :warn:

    C
    r
    a
    z
    y.
    CRAZY.
     
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  45. Tobias

    Tobias doubtful...not with brexit
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    crazy.[spoilercrazy
     
  46. Taques

    Taques this muggy november weather gives me the horribles
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    the storm just passed through boston I’m ok guys
     
  47. Tobias

    Tobias doubtful...not with brexit
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    ahhh bummer lol
     
  48. Taques

    Taques this muggy november weather gives me the horribles
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    exactly what i said lol
     
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  49. Prospector

    Prospector I am not a new member
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    Energy and Environment
    Startling new research finds large buildup of heat in the oceans, suggesting a faster rate of global warming

    The findings mean the world might have less time to curb carbon emissions.
    Chris Mooney and
    Brady Dennis
    October 31 at 2:00 PM
    The world’s oceans have been soaking up far more excess heat in recent decades than scientists realized, suggesting that Earth could be set to warm even faster than predicted in the years ahead, according to new research published Wednesday.

    Over the past quarter-century, the Earth’s oceans have retained 60 percent more heat each year than scientists previously had thought, said Laure Resplandy, a geoscientist at Princeton University who led the startling study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. The difference represents an enormous amount of additional energy, originating from the sun and trapped by the Earth’s atmosphere — more than 8 times the world’s energy consumption, year after year.

    In the scientific realm, the new findings help to resolve long-running doubts about the rate of the warming of the oceans before 2007, when reliable measurements from devices called “Argo floats” were put to use worldwide. Before that, different types of temperature records — and an overall lack of them — contributed to murkiness about how quickly the oceans were heating up.
    The higher-than-expected amount of heat in the oceans means more heat is being retained within the Earth’s climate system each year, rather than escaping into space. In essence, more heat in the oceans signals that global warming itself is more advanced than scientists thought.

    “We thought that we got away with not a lot of warming in both the ocean and the atmosphere for the amount of CO2 that we emitted,” said Resplandy, who published the work with experts from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and several other institutions in the U.S., China, France and Germany. “But we were wrong. The planet warmed more than we thought. It was hidden from us just because we didn’t sample it right. But it was there. It was in the ocean already.”

    Wednesday’s study also could have important policy implications. If ocean temperatures are rising more rapidly than previously calculated, that could leave nations even less time to dramatically cut the world’s emissions of carbon dioxide, in hopes of limiting global warming to the ambitious goal of 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) above preindustrial levels.

    The world already has warmed 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) since the late 19th century. Scientists backed by the United Nations reported this month that with warming projected to steadily increase, the world faces a daunting challenge in trying to limit that warming to only another half-degree Celsius. The group found that it would take “unprecedented” action by leaders across the globe over the coming decade to even have a shot at that goal.

    Meanwhile, the Trump administration has continued to roll back regulations aimed at reducing carbon emissions from vehicles, coal plants and other sources, and has said it intends to withdraw from the Paris climate accord. In one instance, the administration relied on an assumption that the planet will warm a disastrous 7 degrees Fahrenheit, or about 4 degrees Celsius, by the end of the century in arguing that a proposal to ease vehicle fuel-efficiency standards would have only minor climate impacts.

    The new research underscores the potential consequences of global inaction. Rapidly warming oceans mean that seas will rise faster and that more heat will be delivered to critical locations that already are facing the effects of a warming climate, such as coral reefs in the tropics and the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica.

    “In case the larger estimate of ocean heat uptake turns out to be true, adaptation to — and mitigation of — our changing climate would become more urgent,” said Pieter Tans, leader of the Carbon Cycle Greenhouse Gases Group at NOAA, who was not involved in the study.

    The oceans absorb more than 90 percent of the excess energy trapped within the world’s atmosphere.

    The new research does not measure the ocean’s temperature directly. Rather, it measures the volume of gases, specifically oxygen and carbon dioxide, that have escaped the ocean in recent decades and headed into the atmosphere as it heats up. The method offered scientists a reliable indicator of ocean temperature change because it reflects a fundamental behavior of a liquid when heated.

    “When the ocean warms, it loses some gas to the atmosphere,” said Resplandy. “That’s an analogy that I make all the time: if you leave your Coke in the sun, it will lose the gas.”

    This approach allowed researchers to recheck the contested history of ocean temperatures in a different and novel way. In doing so, they came up with a higher number for how much warming the oceans have experienced over time.

    “I feel like this is a triumph of earth system science. That we could get confirmation from atmospheric gases of ocean heat content is extraordinary,” said Joellen Russell, a professor and oceanographer at the University of Arizona. “You’ve got the A-team here on this paper.”

    But Russell said the findings themselves are hardly as uplifting.

    “(It) does have implications for climate sensitivity, meaning how warm does a certain amount of CO2 make us,” Russell said, adding that the world could have a smaller “carbon budget” than once thought. That budget refers to the amount of carbon dioxide humans can emit while still being able to keep warming below dangerous levels.

    The scientists calculated that because of the increased heat already stored in the ocean, the maximum emissions that the world can produce while still avoiding a warming of 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) would have to be reduced by 25 percent. This represents a very significant shrinkage of an already very narrow carbon ‘budget.’

    The U.N. panel of climate scientists said recently that global carbon emissions must be cut in half by 2030 if the world hopes to remain beneath 1.5 Celsius of warming. But Resplandy said that the evidence of faster warming ocean “shifts the probability, making it harder to stay below the 1.5 degree temperature target.

    Understanding what’s happening with Earth’s oceans is critical simply because they, far more than the atmosphere, are the mirror of ongoing climate change.

    According to a major climate report released last year by the U.S. government, the world’s oceans have absorbed about 93 percent of the excess heat caused by greenhouse gases since the mid-20th century. Scientists have found that ocean heat has increased at all depths since the 1960s, while surface waters also have warmed. The federal climate report projected a global increase in average sea surface temperatures of as high as nearly 5 degrees Fahrenheit by 2100 if emissions continue unabated, with even higher levels of warming in some U.S. coastal regions.

    The world’s oceans also currently absorb more than a quarter of the carbon dioxide emitted annually from human activities — an effect making them more acidic and threatening fragile ecosystems, federal researchers say. “The rate of acidification is unparalleled in at least the past 66 million years,” the government climate report stated.

    Paul Durack, a research scientist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, said Wednesday’s study offers “a really interesting new insight” but is “quite alarming.”

    The warming found in the study is “more than twice the rates of long-term warming estimates from 1960s and 70s to the present,” Durack said, adding that if these rates are validated by further studies, “it means the rate of warming and the sensitivity of the Earth’s system to greenhouse gases is at the upper end.” He said that if scientists have underestimated the amount of heat taken up by the oceans, “it will mean we need to go back to the drawing board” on the aggressiveness of mitigation actions the world needs to take promptly to limit future warming.

    Beyond the long-term implications of warmer oceans, Russell added that in the short term, even small changes in ocean temperatures can affect weather in specific places. For instance, scientists have said warmer oceans off the coast of New England have contributed to more intense winter storms.

    “We’re only just now discovering how important ocean warming is to our daily lives, to our daily weather,” she said.