ITT we talk/read about organized crime

Discussion in 'The Mainboard' started by Can I Spliff it, Sep 28, 2015.

  1. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
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  2. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
    Donor

    #2 Can I Spliff it, Sep 28, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2015
  3. Tony Ray Bans

    Tony Ray Bans Most Overlooked. Most Overbooked.
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    Awesome idea for a thread. If anyone wants to go deep on la cosa nostra, I recommend reading The Five Families. Amazing book. I will definitely be posting more in this thread later
     
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  4. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
    Donor

    I'll edit the second post for resources/references anyone wants to post.
     
  5. NoleNBlue

    NoleNBlue The fuck is that? It's an armoire.
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    Triads are so GTA
     
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  6. Capstone 88

    Capstone 88 Going hard in the paint
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    Great thread topic. Will read/watch anything I can get my hands on.
     
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  7. * J Y *

    * J Y * TEXAS
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    Lol the Yakuza makes their members take a standardized exam.
     
  8. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
    Donor

    googling "organized crime syllabus," a LOT of universities have classes on them

    Here are some of the books they require

    Gambetta, D. (1993), The Sicilian Mafia. The Business of Private Protection, Cambridge, MA:Harvard Univ. Press Supplemental Texts(s) (not required to purchase as copies are in NYU-L Library or available on line)
    • Critchley, D. (2009), The Origin of Organized Crime in America: The New York City Mafia, 1891-1931, New York: Routledge
    • Jamieson, A. (2000), The Antimafia, St. Martin’s Press (online)
    • Lupo, S. (2009), History of Sicilian Mafia, New York: Columbia University Press (online) or Dickie, J. (2004), Cosa Nostra: A History of the Sicilian Mafia, London: Palgrave
    • Varese, F. (2011), Mafias on the Move: How Organized Crime Conquers New Page 4 of 9 Territories, Princeton University Press, Princeton
    Abadinsky, Howard. (2013). Organized Crime, Tenth Edition.

    National Defense University's syllabus has a lotttt of reading about how to approach and combat organized crime, as well as readings into the histories of places like latin america
    http://chds.dodlive.mil/files/2013/07/2015-CTOC-Syllabus.pdf

     
  9. IanC

    IanC I'm sorry, the card says Moops
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    Now that the Family Secrets trial is a few years in the past, I hope the mob TV shows do more on those people. They did one on Frank Calabrese, but I'd like to see the Clown Lombardo featured.

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. NoleNBlue

    NoleNBlue The fuck is that? It's an armoire.
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    Took Organized Crime at FSU. There were 2 professors who taught it. One was awesome, one was feces. I got the feces one.
     
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  11. Tony Ray Bans

    Tony Ray Bans Most Overlooked. Most Overbooked.
    Texas Tech Red RaidersDallas Cowboys

    This is the best doc I have ever seen on the Russian Mob. Fascinating stuff

     
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  12. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
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  13. C A N E

    C A N E Well-Known Member
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    Where's Salvatore Leone?
     
  14. Tiffin

    Tiffin Florida is a penis.
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    Just here to say would on the chick with the leg tattoo in OP.
     
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  15. Brewtus

    Brewtus Got dat juice
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    The documentary series currently available on Netflix, Inside The American Mob, is amazing. The opening seen had me hooked.
     
  16. Brewtus

    Brewtus Got dat juice
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  17. colonel_forbin

    colonel_forbin Well-Known Member
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    The Five Families was great. A great history of the NY mafia.

    Cosa Nostra: A History of the Sicilian Mafia was good too.

    The Sicilian mafia shits all over the American mafia.
     
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  18. FriarJuggs

    Donor

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  19. Don't Hate Me Bro!

    Don't Hate Me Bro! Wigglin my toes on a mink rug...
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    Selwyn Raab's book really is the best.



    I'm a big LCN, particularly Chicago Outfit nerd... Jeff Coen's 'Family Secrets' book is excellent, Frank Jr.'s is good too, Steve Warmbir's Sun Times blog is good as well.

    I don't know how familiar you are with Mishawaka, but there used to be an adult bookstore on Mishawaka Ave. right next to the 7-11 across from the riverwalk; it was Outfit controlled, Nick and Frank Jr. used to make collections from there. They (the Outfit) also ran a large book that operated the majority of football cards in the South Bend area as well as video slots/poker machines, it got busted ~15 years ago, a bunch of liquor stores and bars were raided.

    A further ND connection, during the 50's, 60's the FBI's lead man vs the Outfit was Bill Roemer, ND grad and the first 4x Bengal Bouts champ. Also the uncle of ND grad/former IN congressman Tim Roemer (who my dad went to school with at Penn). Bill wrote some entertaining, but highly "exaggerated" and factually inaccurate books about Tony Accardo and Anthony Spilotro. There's still good information on there, especially the first illegal wire taps and bugs used vs the Outfit, particularly the one's on Sam Giancanna.

    Iconic picture of Outfit leaders in the 70's
    [​IMG]
    "The Last Supper"

    L to R clockwise...
    Joseph "Joey Doves" Auippa - Outfit boss at the time, basis for "Remo Gaggi" character in the movie Casino.
    Dominick DiBella - retiring near North Side boss, his "last supper" as he was dying of cancer.
    Vince Solano - DiBella's replacement as near North Side boss.
    Al Pillotto - Chicago Heights/Indiana boss.
    Jackie "The Lackey" Cerrone (standing) - Elmwood Park boss, Outfit underboss.
    Joey "The Clown" Lombardo (standing) - Grand Ave boss.
    James "Turk" Torello - Cicero boss.
    Joe "Little Caesar" DiVarco - Rush Street boss.
    "Black Joe" Amato - Lake County/far north side boss.
    Tony "Joe Batters/Big Tuna" Accardo - Outfit consligere, former boss, some say was the real Outfit boss the entire time and others were just front/street bosses.

    And here's a quick recap of Lombardo's career I found around the time of the Family Secrets trial...
    I think I mentioned in one of these threads before my dad was in the car business with a Tampa mob soldier named Joe Camero in the 70's/80's. Nothing too interesting, Florida during that time was like the roaring 20's; everyone was into something.
     
  20. JGator1

    JGator1 I'm the Michael Jordan of the industry
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    We had a similar thread a few years ago but I'll add in a bunch of stuff later when I get the chance.
     
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  21. RoyalShocker

    RoyalShocker But I don't wanna be a Nazi
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    Thank you for posting this... What a fantastic documentary.

    Reinforces the idea that Russians are the scariest people on earth... And then, you hear that THEY are afraid of Chechens... Lol fuck off.

    Looking forward to this thread.
     
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  22. Tony Ray Bans

    Tony Ray Bans Most Overlooked. Most Overbooked.
    Texas Tech Red RaidersDallas Cowboys

    I watched it again last night after I posted it. Never stops fascinating me. Glad you enjoyed it man!
     
  23. Jake Scott

    Jake Scott Well-Known Member
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    Looks like I've got some catching up to do.
     
  24. Fuzzy Zoeller

    Fuzzy Zoeller College football > NFL

    I wish I was part of a crime family so bad.
     
  25. TC

    TC [expletive] strong ass post
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    Can you get whacked for reading this thread TIA
     
  26. JGator1

    JGator1 I'm the Michael Jordan of the industry
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    I'll add another recommendation for Selwyn Raab's Five Families, great book that everyone interested in the mafia should read.

    Along with the 5 NYC mafia families I think Philly is among the most fascinating throughout history with periods of relatively little violence and then tons of it. George Anastasia is an excellent writer whose spent decades covering the Philly mob, he used to do short Mob Talk/Mob Scene videos that are pretty much all on youtube. https://www.youtube.com/user/omnikey64/videos
     
  27. NoleNBlue

    NoleNBlue The fuck is that? It's an armoire.
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    Raab and Cohen are two dudes I'd love to go out drinking with and just let them talk
     
  28. Joey Freshwater

    Joey Freshwater Slingin The Pipe Since 75
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    Really interesting thread. I will enjoy reading/watching all of this.
     
  29. TheChad

    TheChad Boiled peanuts are good

    For later
     
  30. JGator1

    JGator1 I'm the Michael Jordan of the industry
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    two older mafia documentaries with pretty rare interviews in spoiler

     
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  31. VoodooChild5

    VoodooChild5 Fan of: Notre Dame
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    I enjoy their given names and nicknames just as much as I enjoy reading about how they were murdered.
     
  32. Brewtus

    Brewtus Got dat juice
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    Anyone know how big the Detroit mafia got? Haven't read up on it much.
     
  33. HatterasJack

    HatterasJack Is your refrigerator running? It's Mike Hunt.
    Donor

    Havana Nocturne is a good read if you are interested in mob activities in pre-Castro Cuba.
     
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  34. JGator1

    JGator1 I'm the Michael Jordan of the industry
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    Hardly an expert but they were pretty big back in the day I think around 100 made guys, it's dwindled down like most families have. Guys were essentially required to marry the daughters of other mob guys which built up a lot of family loyalty. They've still got a few guys but in terms of active made guys it's fairly limited. The 40-50 made guys and 250 associates from wikipedia is completely wrong.
     
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  35. Wallcoq

    Wallcoq Miles of D.
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    That was fantastic. Favorite part. The one guy said, I wanted a passport to travel around freely. I met an Isreali woman, married her and got a passport. I got sick of Isreal after 6 months. Wife died, I buried her, and then I moved to France.
     
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  36. Tony Ray Bans

    Tony Ray Bans Most Overlooked. Most Overbooked.
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    Haha the two scenes that always stick with me are when they ask the guy if he is a success and he points to all that gaudy ass Louis V luggage and goes "Do I LOOK like a success?" lol and then the part where the same guy basically openly admits to bribing Olympic judges to rule in Russian's favor just kind of as a hobby haha
     
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  37. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
    Donor

  38. PeteTopKevinBottom

    PeteTopKevinBottom Well-Known Member

    I had New Zealand lady. Got 98
     
  39. Trip McNeely

    Trip McNeely Guys like us....we are a dime a dozen
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    Pretty good book about the Kansas City crime family written by a former FBI agent who helped bring down Nick Civella. I know some family members of some of the major players, which made it particularly interesting.

    [​IMG]
     
    #41 Trip McNeely, Sep 30, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2015
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  40. JGator1

    JGator1 I'm the Michael Jordan of the industry
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    Few myths about mob life in spoilers because of length, stolen from another forum

    DOES THE MAFIA TAKE CARE OF “STANDUP GUYS”?
    Nope. Not anymore--if they ever did...

    The myth that the Mafia will support a made guy and his family if he honors omerta was expressed quaintly in the GF novel. Puzo wrote that a man sent to prison “had only to keep his mouth shut and his wife and children would be cared for…a warm welcome would be his when he left prison…a party…the best food and wine…all his friends and relatives gathered to rejoice in his freedom…perhaps even the Don himself would drop by to pay his respects to such a stalwart…”

    This tale may have had some basis before World War II, when Mob economics were simpler. Soldiers did the grunt work that was most likely to expose them to arrest (the higher-ups got the white collar rackets). In the days before investigative journalism and instant electronic news media, it was far easier for the Mob to bribe politicians, judges and law enforcement—and for them to accept the bribes without detection. Often, Mob soldiers were caught in so-called “victimless” crimes, such as gambling, prostitution and illicit alcohol. And people hurt or killed in Mob shakedowns and violence were those that society didn’t care about—degenerate gamblers, drug addicts, crooked labor leaders, ethnic minorities, etc. So it was easy for a soldier who actually got arrested and convicted to receive a light sentence, or have a major charge reduced to a minor one. In those hard economic times, a soldier didn’t live a lot better than a regular working stiff, so his financial needs were small, and the payout to his family was small, too. The soldier needed his job, and it was in his interest to keep his mouth shut, suck up the light sentence, and go back to work after prison. And there was no Witness Protection Program to shelter him.

    But the myth pales before the reality that today’s Mafia is an empire based on greed. Its financial structure is a pyramid scheme in which money flows upward to the Don, not downward to soldiers. A Don takes the attitude that the soldier knew the risks when he signed on. If he gets caught, it’s his problem. In today’s every-man-for-himself Mafia, the assumption is that he’ll turn rat anyway. So the imperative for the Don is to protect himself through “buffers,” not to buy silence by supporting the soldier and his family, which the Don would view as a sign of weakness on his part—in effect, setting himself up for potential blackmail.

    John Gotti’s career provides real-life examples. Gotti had been in Carmine Fatico’s Gambino Family crew for about 12 years when he was arrested in 1968 for hijacking. He got a three-year sentence—and no help from the Gambinos. His family was forced onto the welfare rolls, and his wife almost divorced him. When he got out, he was made acting crew chief. But when he was arrested in 1974 after killing James McBratney, who had kidnapped and murdered Gambino’s nephew, he got no help directly from his Don. Instead, Gambino passed the hat around to his capos and crew chiefs. They reluctantly coughed up enough money to hire Roy Cohn, one of New York’s highest-powered lawyers, who got the charge reduced from murder to manslaughter. Gotti didn’t get formally “made” until he got out of prison four years later.

    And that’s how Gambino, the most powerful Don, in the most powerful family in the US, treated a “standup guy” who later became the Don. Later, Gotti tried to get Sammy Da Bull to take the rap for the Castellano murder—which stimulated Da Bull to rat Gotti out.

    There’s not only no honor among thieves, there’s no loyalty, either.

    good explanation of how the mafia is involved in drugs
    OF COURSE The Mob deals drugs--but don't get caught!

    A durable myth of the Mafia is that that they "ban" drug trafficking, and decree the "death penalty" for dealers. Wrong! The Mafia has been dealing drugs since Day One. Don Vito Cascio Ferro came to NYC in the early years of the last century in part to establish a drugs pipeline between Europe and the US. Charlie Luciano dealt drugs as a young man, and is reputed to have ratted out a partner in return for getting a pass from the cops. Joe Bonanno's "vacation" in Italy in 1957 was really a meeting with Luciano and some Sicilians to make Bonanno the top drugs guy in America. The aborted Apalachin NY meeting that year was, in part, an attempt by Vito Genovese to outflank Bonanno as the top drugs guy. He and Joe Valachi went to prison on drug charges. John Gotti was the top earner in Neil Dellacroce's empire becauase he and his crew dealt drugs...and on and on.

    Drug-dealing puts Mafia bosses in a quandary: They know that heavy penalties are a threat to them. But they love the money that drugs bring in. They also know that a “ban” on drug trafficking in their families would be unenforceable—there is too much money and greed to stop it. They’d be in the position of the Federal Government during Prohibition: passing a law that nobody obeyed and everyone disrespected—and a Mafia boss can’t afford any disrespect. They wouldn’t be able to effectively police their families: how could they know everything that every street guy was doing every hour of every day? They might be in the position of having to kill the wrong guy, or worse (from their viewpoint), a good earner. Finally, a real “ban” would simply drive the trafficking totally underground—meaning that they wouldn’t get their cut.

    So the Mafia Dons fall back on the common denominator of Mob life: hypocrisy. They declare a "ban" on anyone caught selling drugs, with a death penalty for violators--and promptly look the other way. They figure that the threat will discourage the weaker soldiers, who are more likely to get caught. The more capable, ambitious guys are be willing to take the risks—and are less likely to get caught. The money continues to flow upward, which is all the bosses care about.

    Now let’s look at how this might work in real life:

    Vinny is an up-and-coming made guy in a NY family that officially “bans” drug trafficking. He’s a good earner, so he’s been given a slice of territory in Spanish Harlem, where he has some gambling, sports betting and loan shark action. One day, Jose, a neighborhood guy who’s an occasional borrower, asks Vinny to lend him $8k for two weeks. Whoa, says Vinny, that’s a lot—what do I get as surety for my loan (other than your kneecaps)? Not to worry, says Jose: I know a guy who knows a guy who’s a crewman on a freighter coming to NY from Lebanon. He’s bringing in a kilo of heroin. By the time we finish cutting the stuff and selling it, we’ll make $80k. Vinny says yes. Two weeks later, Jose (looking real dapper in new threads and gold chains) pays him his $8k plus $960 vig (6%/week for two weeks). Technically, Vinny didn’t violate the Family’s ban on drug dealing—he didn’t sell drugs. But he financed a drug deal that put a key of H on the street.

    Like every other Mob guy, Vinny’s greedy: why should he make only $960 on a deal that netted a nobody like Jose more than $70k? Jose comes to him a month later and says he wants to borrow $40k because the sailor’s coming in again, this time with five keys of H. Vinny says that, for such a big loan, he’ll have to meet the guy. He tells Jose to bring the sailor, and his five keys, to a Mobbed-up bar near the waterfront. As soon as they meet, Vinny pushes Jose aside and tells the guy that he’ll buy the five keys, directly. He tells him he wants a “volume discount”: Since he’s buying such a big quantity, he’ll pay $5k per key, not the $8k that Jose was going to pay. The sailor starts to protest but Vinny replies: “Hey, you’re still makin’ a pile of money on s**t that didn’t cost you more’n a coupla grand in Syria or wherever you got it. You don’t like it, you can leave—feet first.” The guy catches the drift, takes Vinny’s $25k and hands over the five kilos of heroin. Vinny smiles: “Hey, I’ll take all the s**t you wanna bring in, anytime you come to NY. Just let Jose know when you’re gonna be here.”

    Jose’s been too scared to say anything, so Vinny throws him a bone. He puts his arm around him and says, “Hey, ya done good tonite, Jose. I’m gonna let you have that H. It’ll cost you $20k per key—that’s my fee for hosting the sitdown and for protection. Don’t worry about sellin’ it—if the s**t’s as good as you said, you can cut it down more.” Where’s Jose going to get $20k/kilo? He can borrow it from Vinny! Now Vinny’s got two sources of profit: he quadrupled what he paid for the heroin—and he’s getting vig from the guy he cheated. He could make even more if he sold it on the street, but Vinny’s too smart to take that risk, and too busy to spend his time mixing milk sugar with the drug and selling dime bags to a bunch of lowlifes. He’ll let Jose do it.

    Now, Jose’s really got to hustle to make his payments to Vinny. So he recruits some members of a local street gang to sell the dime bags. But those guys are ruthless—they’re not going to settle for making a dollar on every dime bag. Their leader kills Jose, takes the remaining dime bags, cuts them further, and sells them. This is just what Vinny was expecting. He lets a couple of weeks go by, then grabs the gang leader off the street. Vinny tells the gang-banger forcefully that he assumed Jose’s debt when he appropriated Jose’s stash—and he’s now two weeks behind in the vig. He smacks him around to reinforce his point. Then he smiles: “You can make up the vig, and make yourself more money, if you buy the rest of the s**t and distribute it. I’ll even make sure nobody interferes with your operation in this neighborhood.” The gang-banger, grateful for his life, accepts.

    Vinny’s now making even more money. He kicks a nice piece of it upstairs to his crew chief. In turn, the crew chief passes a cut to his capo, who shares his piece with the Don. Pretty soon, that whole East Harlem operation, and everyone in it, is looking very good to the Don. But the Don’s not dumb—he has a good idea where the money originates. He hears about a drug bust that netted some members of a Jamaican posse in Brooklyn. He mentions to his capos, “Hey, it’s a real good thing that we have a ban on selling drugs in our borgata, and a death penalty for violators. Otherwise we’d wind up like them no-good, undisciplined mulinians over there.” The capos pass the word on down. Vinny’s crew chief, who knows what’s going on, says to Vinny, “Uh, by the way, you ain’t sellin’ drugs, are you?” “Me?” replies Vinny, indignantly. “Sellin’ f*****’ s**t to a buncha lowlifes on the street? Not on your f*****’ life!” Vinny told the literal truth: he’s not actually selling drugs on the street—he’s just wholesaling drugs to the guys who are selling them. As far as he’s concerned, he’s not violating the family’s ban on “selling drugs.” His crew chief is satisfied—and so’s everyone over him. They’re all getting their piece of Vinny’s action. As long as Vinny’s producing money, they’re content to look the other way. If he gets caught, he knows they’ll try to kill him before he can rat them out. Everyone knows the score.

    few photos of Philly guys past and present, I'll post others if people want
    Nicky Scarfo in his office, I think at Scarf Inc in Atlantic City
    [​IMG]
    Skinny Joey Merlino(believed to be the boss of Philly) and Uncle Joe Ligambi(former acting boss of Philly)
    [​IMG]
    Stevie Mazzone(acting boss at one time) on left, George Borgesi(consigliere) on the right
    [​IMG]
    Borgesi, Mazzone, Ralph Natale(former boss turned informant), Mike "Mikey Lance" Lancellotti(powerful capo whose managed to avoid big charges), Marty Angelina(underboss), Frank Gambino
    [​IMG]
    Angelo Bruno "Gentle Don"(former boss murdered in 1980)
    [​IMG]
    famous picture of Bruno dead after a shotgun blast to the back of his head
    [​IMG]
     
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  41. JGator1

    JGator1 I'm the Michael Jordan of the industry
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    a few wiretaps, Gotti, Castellano, Stanfa, etc
    Tommy Agro was a scary motherfucker





     
  42. bignate50

    bignate50 Well-Known Member
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    Trying to find the video of Salvatore Magnotora getting murked. Can't find it anywhere anymore. Anyways it was pretty neat
     
  43. Don't Hate Me Bro!

    Don't Hate Me Bro! Wigglin my toes on a mink rug...
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    Who?
     
  44. JGator1

    JGator1 I'm the Michael Jordan of the industry
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    Nicky Scarfo "testifying" before a Senate subcommittee
     
  45. Larry Sura

    Larry Sura Tuyuq. Fratzy
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    these guys are "bad" and all, but 3 6 mafia is the goat
     
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  46. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
    Donor

  47. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
    Donor

  48. verbalduck

    verbalduck Boats & Hoes
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    Great thread, I have read a bunch or organized crime books, a few good ones below.... Currently reading Mafia Prince, the Philly Mob is a fascinating train wreck. Tokyo Vice is on deck

    The Westies (Irish Mob book, Featherstone and Coonan were nuts)
    Mafia Dynasty (La Cosa Nostra history)
    Made Men. (Jersey Mafia)
    Red Mafia (very interesting read, The Russians are on another level)
    Underboss. (Sammy the Bull's story, pretty good, lots of day to day Mob stories)