Kansas City Chiefs: By Committee

Discussion in 'The Mainboard' started by angus, Sep 9, 2016.

  1. racer

    racer Yuma, where I work in software.
    Donor
    Iowa HawkeyesKansas City ChiefsLas Vegas Golden KnightsWatfordSneakersOlympicsTravel

    EMAW FC likes this.
  2. racer

    racer Yuma, where I work in software.
    Donor
    Iowa HawkeyesKansas City ChiefsLas Vegas Golden KnightsWatfordSneakersOlympicsTravel

  3. ono

    ono Well-Known Member
    Donor
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSeattle SupersonicsSporting Kansas City

    An awesome read on Kelce in the Athletic today.

    https://theathletic.com/3093192/202...-transformed-into-chiefs-newest-vocal-leader/

    ‘He’s grown up’: After years of maturing, Travis Kelce has transformed into the Chiefs’ newest vocal leader

    Nate Taylor Jan 28, 2022[​IMG] 24 [​IMG]
    Travis Kelce listened intently for the pivotal play call. Staying in the moment inside the huddle Sunday night, the star tight end knew the play had the potential to be the final one of the Chiefs’ season.

    Kelce lined up as the lone receiving option on the left side of the Chiefs’ formation. But the Chiefs’ opponent, the Buffalo Bills, called a timeout. With just eight seconds left in regulation, the Bills, who possessed a three-point lead, wanted to discuss their defensive strategy, their plan to prevent the Chiefs from getting into field goal range. The Bills’ timeout also helped Kelce.

    Before huddling again, it was Kelce — not quarterback Patrick Mahomes — who led the short conversation. Kelce’s idea was a blend of intelligence, creativity and gumption. He told Mahomes he didn’t want to run his intended route. He wanted to ad-lib, running a route he anticipated the Bills could never anticipate.

    After the timeout, Mahomes, from the shotgun, watched the Bills’ defense set up. Just one defender, between the line of scrimmage and 20 yards away, was on the left side of the field and in front of Kelce.

    “Do it, Kelce!” Mahomes shouted. “Do it! Do it, Kelce!”

    Lining up in the same spot, Kelce’s nifty route started with him leaning his body to the left, which gave the impression he was heading toward the sideline, the exact area the one defender was most responsible for covering. But with his left foot, Kelce then shifted his body back forward, a slick out-and-up route, before turning his head toward Mahomes, who delivered it to him in stride for a season-saving 25-yard reception.



    Mahomes raised his right arm. The crowd inside Arrowhead Stadium began roaring again. Mahomes pointed his right index finger at Kelce to praise one of his favorite teammates for one of their most impressive plays together, a perfect completion from a gunslinger who loves making backyard-type highlights to a one-of-a-kind tight end who can run any route and catch any backyard pass.

    The next play was a made 49-yard field goal from kicker Harrison Butker to end regulation. With overtime awaiting, the first teammate from the sideline to offer a handshake and words of encouragement to the offensive linemen and Butker was Kelce.

    By now, Kelce, in his ninth season, can be described in many ways — a champion, an innovator of the tight end position, an entertainer, an overachiever, a first-ballot Hall of Famer.

    Midway through this season, Kelce became the Chiefs’ longest-tenured player, having joined the team in 2013 just months after coach Andy Reid arrived. This season, Kelce, at age 32, has added to his reputation and legacy within the organization for his actions when he is not running on the field, when he is not overwhelming linebackers, cornerbacks and safeties.

    “He’s that vocal leader that you need,” receiver Tyreek Hill said of Kelce. “Even for me, I’m six years in, and it feels good for me just to hear that confidence-booster from Travis. He’s definitely a guy that we need to bring that energy.”

    Leadership moments from Kelce are similar to his touchdowns — he does it with flair, intensity and genuine exuberance.

    The Chiefs’ locker room is full of vivid personalities with core players such as Mahomes, Hill, safety Tyrann Mathieu and pass rushers Chris Jones, Frank Clark and Melvin Ingram. Those players will tell you that Kelce’s voice — and his motivating messages — is one of the team’s most important.

    “When you’ve had a guy that’s had that much success, and he’s able to show his emotion and wants to fight to the very end, it kind of bleeds through the rest of the team,” Mahomes said of Kelce.

    Reid and offensive coordinator Eric Bieniemy appreciate Kelce for how much the tight end, throughout his career, has grown, a progression that is parallel to the ascension of the Chiefs going from a respectable team to a perennial championship contender.

    In November, Bieniemy held a meeting for the Chiefs’ offense that involved a film session. But in this meeting, Bieniemy didn’t show the players clips of them performing in a previous game. Instead, Bieniemy showed Kelce on the Chiefs’ sideline showing a younger teammate, tight end Jody Fortson, how to run his route better for the next series. In another moment, Kelce was reminding the Chiefs’ new offensive linemen, including three rookies (Creed Humphrey, Trey Smith and Lucas Niang) the mentality they must have in order for the unit to score a touchdown on the next drive. After successful plays, Bieniemy praised Kelce in the meeting for his approach in commending his teammates after their success.

    Bieniemy wanted the rest of the players in the room, many of them in the early part of their careers, to gain a greater appreciation of Kelce’s attitude, focus and interpersonal skills, which has led to collaborative success on the field.

    “I wanted those guys to see and feel that,” Bieniemy said of Kelce. “He’s a great person. And I’ve got to say this: He has a tremendous personality. When things are going bad, Kelce does a great job of rallying the guys on the sideline.”



    Prior to leaves falling off trees, the Chiefs’ offense was struggling compared to previous years. Mahomes, a four-year starter, experienced his first slump. Other AFC teams — the Bills, the Baltimore Ravens and the Los Angeles Chargers — had defeated the Chiefs. Throughout each experience of failure, Kelce was often the veteran who found and expressed the appropriate words.

    In Week 6, the Chiefs were in danger of losing to the Washington Football Team. Mahomes threw a horrid interception just before halftime, a wild, ill-advised lob intended for Kelce. Mahomes clapped his hands in frustration.

    “I went up to him,” Kelce said. “I just said, ‘Just be you, man; just be Pat Mahomes.’”

    Physically, Kelce didn’t feel his best that day. He played against the Washington Football Team while feeling severe discomfort in his upper body and neck from a stinger, an injury he sustained the previous week against the Bills. Kelce never left the field. He ran routes, blocked on the edge during running plays and still found enough soft spots against the zone coverage to record eight receptions for 99 yards.

    Two weeks later, the Chiefs were heavily criticized by many analysts. The team had a disappointing 4-3 record following a blowout loss to the Tennessee Titans. Inside the Chiefs’ training facility, Kelce spent time reflecting on his previous teammates, the previous leaders who used to refocus the rest of the team.

    “When I first got here, the guys I learned from were Alex Smith, Anthony Fasano and Derrick Johnson,” Kelce said. “Those guys showed me how to be a professional every day, making the most of each practice and rep.”

    Kelce questioned himself and his teammates. What are we doing in practice that will allow us to play the right way? Are we listening with intent and focus before each play? Is what we’re doing helping or hurting the team?

    “I feel we’ve caught a groove,” Kelce said Nov. 18. “Everybody is finally starting to come around, at least in terms of the work ethic and how everybody is dialed in at practice.”



    Since that day, the Chiefs have won eight of the last nine games. The offense’s production increased, too, a return of gaudy statistics and highlights that reminded the rest of the NFL of the Chiefs’ potency.

    Kelce remained reliable to his teammates. He generated 92 receptions in the regular season for 1,125 yards and 10 total touchdowns. He also became the sixth tight end in league history to eclipse 9,000 career receiving yards, doing so in the fewest number of games, 127. (Rob Gronkowski eclipsed the mark in his 140th game.)

    In a season in which he has emphasized his teammates more than himself, Kelce acknowledged a few weeks ago that he is proud of his individual growth. Kelce’s teammates honored him around the same time by voting for him to be one of the team’s postseason captains.

    “What I’m more proud of,” he said, “is that I represent the team in the right way.”

    A phone call can change a person’s life. One of those calls for Kelce occurred April 26, 2013. Surrounded by his family — father, Ed, mother, Donna, and brother Jason — Kelce received a call during the third round of the NFL Draft. Kelce, who grew up in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, thought seeing a Missouri area code on his smartphone meant he was going to be selected by the then-St. Louis Rams.

    Begrudgingly, Kelce said hello into his smartphone. He was surprised when he heard Reid’s voice.

    “Listen, are you going to fuck this up?!” Reid said. “Are you going to screw up this opportunity if I take you?!”

    Shocked by the questions, Kelce answered with what he thought was his only option: He promised Reid he would do his best.

    Reid was aware of Kelce’s issues. Always known as an emotional person, Kelce made an unwise decision in college. He was suspended for the 2010 season at the University of Cincinnati for violating team rules. The person who advocated for Kelce was Jason, his older brother. In 2011, Reid, as the coach of the Philadelphia Eagles, selected Jason, a center, with a sixth-round pick. On the same phone call, Kelce handed the smartphone to Jason, who promised Reid that the Chiefs were getting the best tight end in the 2013 draft class. The conclusion to the conversation began with Reid saying a sentence that Kelce will never forget:

    “Welcome to the Kansas City Chiefs.”

    After nine years together with Reid, Kelce knows when the Chiefs will be challenged the most throughout a season.

    Some of the team’s most grueling practices happen after training camp, when fans can no longer watch the team at Missouri Western State University, and before the start of the regular season. Those practices are at least two hours long and are often conducted in sweltering heat. A sizable number of players also feel pressure around this time to work harder with the hope that they’ll earn a spot on the team’s initial 53-man roster. Plus, the players are tired of practicing against one another.

    In one of those practices in late August, frustration had finally reached the level to where the team had its first skirmish. A defensive lineman shoved an offensive lineman, who shoved back. A punch was thrown. Reid and Bieniemy didn’t budge. As the tension escalated, Kelce shouted as the two players were being separated.

    “Don’t you ever fucking swing at a teammate again!”

    The commotion ended. Reid, who didn’t address the team at that moment because Kelce did, called for the next repetition, and the practice returned to its normal rhythm.

    Of course, Kelce has had to overcome his own mistakes. His maturity was one of the biggest concerns for teams drafting ahead of the Chiefs in 2013. With the Chiefs, he became a magnetic force, a tight end with receiver skills who followed touchdowns by dancing in the end zone. And his emotions, at times, hurt the team, too.

    In a 2016 win over the Jacksonville Jaguars, he was ejected. He was so enraged when the officials didn’t throw a flag when he felt the defender committed pass interference to prevent him from catching a pass in the end zone, that he shouted and threw his towel at the referee. Kelce started the 2017 season committing an unsportsmanlike-conduct penalty in consecutive weeks after having one in 2016 in the playoff loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers. Reid voiced his frustration by screaming at Kelce on the sideline. Kelce has yet to commit such a penalty since.

    “Little stuff like that is unneeded,” Kelce said. “When you think about doing something stupid, don’t do it. Just be able to control that emotion.”

    Throughout his 23 years as a head coach, Reid has been successful in guiding several talented players through the metamorphosis from immature youngster to team leader. Kelce perhaps has been Reid’s greatest example of a player correcting mistakes on the field and transforming into a better, more methodical competitor.

    “Travis just keeps growing as a player, leader, person,” Reid said. “He pushed through the tough time earlier in the season, but kept leading. He’s really taken that role seriously. That’s fun to see.”

    Being accountable to the team, no matter the situation, became Kelce’s ultimate priority. Despite sustaining nagging injuries at various points in the past four years, Kelce has played in 73 of the last 74 games (including the postseason), the lone absence occurring last month after he tested positive for COVID-19.

    “I love seeing guys progress,” Ryan Poles, the Chiefs’ former director of player personnel and the Chicago Bears’ new general manager, said of Kelce. “I love watching guys like Travis come into the league — and knowing his situation — go through an injury and then build and become one of the best to do it. That’s satisfying to me.”

    When the Chiefs install a new offensive play, Kelce doesn’t look at the concept just from his position on the whiteboard or tablet. As a former quarterback in high school, Kelce became fascinated this season by attempting to create new plays or concepts for the Chiefs’ offense. He recognized the surplus of talented skill-position teammates in training camp and was determined to find new ways to get those players the ball in an advantageous spot.

    Bieniemy, a former NFL running back, says it’s rare when a star player of Kelce’s caliber has such a high level of awareness that they become a coach on the field.

    “Travis is going to attract a lot of attention, so teams are doing whatever they can to try to take him away and neutralize him,” Bieniemy said of Kelce. “But what it does is open up the next man. He’s getting the other guys more involved and saying, ‘Hey, it’s your job to make this play if they’re going to double me or do whatever.’”

    In plays near the goal line, Kelce has attracted multiple defenders in the end zone, which allowed Fortson and rookie tight end Noah Gray to each win one-on-one matchups for their first career touchdowns. After both plays, Kelce embraced the younger tight end and shared the same message: “That’s the first of many!”



    Kelce’s best-designed play was developed in September during one of the Chiefs’ special-teams periods during practice.

    “It’s a lot of fun because when the players are designing it, you know they’re going to find a way to make it work,” Bieniemy said. “When you see it and you feel it, it’s something that you say, ‘You know what, let’s roll with it.’”

    The Chiefs’ win over the Eagles in early October featured Reid becoming the first coach in league history to win 100 games, including the playoffs, for two different franchises — the Eagles (appropriately, given the setting) and the Chiefs. Reid and Bieniemy also used Kelce’s “Tom and Jerry” play to finish a drive with a touchdown.

    With the ball at the 1-yard line, Kelce ran across the formation behind the offensive line to get the Eagles’ attention. Kelce was correct in anticipating that the Eagles would believe that he would receive an underhanded pass — similar to how a bowler releases the ball — from Mahomes. As a linebacker chased Kelce, Mahomes threw his underhanded pass to running back Clyde Edwards-Helaire, who caught the ball in the open space in the middle of the field before entering the end zone with ease.

    “Obviously, I’m Jerry,” said a smiling Edwards-Helaire, who is listed at 5-foot-8, the shortest player on the team. “Tom was Travis.”



    Later in the game, Kelce played the role of decoy. While in motion, Kelce spread his arms out to show his hands to the Eagles, as if questioning Mahomes on what to do next. Two defenders followed Kelce back to the perimeter as the ball was snapped, which created an opening for Fortson to catch a shovel pass from Mahomes for a smooth 2-yard touchdown.

    Kelce thanked Reid and Bieniemy a few weeks ago for allowing him to have more input within the offense, the ability to line up in different spots or motion before the snap to force the opposing defense to be in a reactionary state. The reward, Kelce said, is when his teammates thank him for playing a part in their highlight-worthy play.

    “He goes out there and plays with passion, but he’s definitely grown up,” Mahomes said of Kelce. “He could come in and just do his job and get out of here. But he’s in here all the time and he’s working. You want guys like that on your team.”



    In the film room, Gray describes Kelce as a teacher. Kelce has watched every route Gray has run in practice this season, even when the rookie goes through his repetitions with the scout-team offense. Every repetition, Kelce has reminded Gray, matters because you can learn something, no matter how small, about manipulating an opposing defense’s coverage.

    Reid has empowered Kelce with the freedom to improvise his route in the middle of a play, with the understanding that Mahomes can ad-lib just as much that the Chiefs should always have the advantage if the teammates are reading the defense’s coverage in the same manner.

    “He has a great sense for space and how to work in space to get himself open,” Reid said of Kelce. “It helps that the quarterback likes him.”

    A month ago, Ted Crews, the vice president of communications, approached Kelce just hours before the Chiefs’ critical road game against the Chargers. Crews wanted to chat with Kelce about Jason, who the day before was announced as the Eagles’ nominee for the Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year Award, the league’s most prestigious honor for a player’s excellence on and off the field. Crews watched the Eagles’ news conference. Jason became emotional and cried when he shared how NFL players can symbolize hope for other people. Following Crews’ recommendation, Travis watched, crying when he watched his brother cry. Travis started playing the sport because of his older brother. He played at Cincinnati to be his brother’s teammate. He proved that his brother’s opinion about him to Reid in 2013 was indeed accurate. Each brother marveled when the other helped their team become Super Bowl champions. For the rest of the day, Travis was inspired to perform well against the Chargers by reflecting on the one word Jason emphasized: hope.

    Hours later, in the fourth quarter, Kelce was the Chiefs’ biggest optimist on the sideline. The Chiefs trailed by eight points. A little more than nine minutes were left in regulation. Mahomes was in the midst of what appeared to be an underwhelming performance. Kelce then served as Mahomes’ sidekick.

    “He was just like, ‘Hey, let’s show that heart,’” Mahomes said of Kelce that night. “It seems like he’s always that guy for everybody.”

    In a comeback victory that was essential to the Chiefs capturing their sixth consecutive AFC West crown, Kelce produced one of his finest performances, generating a career-high 191 receiving yards and two touchdowns. Mahomes, in the game’s final 10 minutes, completed 10 of his 13 attempts for 197 passing yards and three touchdowns.

    The game’s walk-off touchdown was a 34-yard connection from Mahomes to Kelce, who evaded six defenders before reaching the end zone.



    In the immediate celebration, Mahomes told Kelce he loved him. Every teammate either hugged Kelce, high-fived with him or patted his helmet. Kelce cherished the opportunity, in the Chiefs’ postgame news conference, to explain how he summoned greatness within him while helping uplift Mahomes to reach his optimum level.

    “We play a game of hope,” Kelce said. “Don’t let doubt seep in. That’s a life lesson, not just football.”

    Once hope is established, belief can be powerful.

    In less than eight seconds, Kelce’s ingenuity against the Bills led to a reception that provided hope for his teammates, his coaches and every Chiefs fan inside Arrowhead Stadium. Before overtime began, Kelce walked along the sideline, looked into the eyes of his teammates and, once again, shared a galvanizing message, one to propel the Chiefs to victory, the AFC Championship Game and perhaps the final achievement of them hoisting the Vince Lombardi Trophy.

    “End this shit!” Kelce said. “END THIS SHIT!”

    In the end, the Chiefs’ offense did. Kelce executed the game’s final task, a walk-off, game-winning 8-yard touchdown reception after running a smooth out-and-up route to the corner of the end zone.

    “Just watching him grow, from being a kid to now being a man in this industry, and one of the better tight ends in the history of the game, it’s actually been a hell of a ride,” Bieniemy said of Kelce. “I probably need to look back upon it even more to appreciate some of the things that he’s done.”

    On the field, after he was mobbed yet again by his celebrating teammates, Kelce kept looking into the stands to relish the fans’ jubilation. Reid responded to Kelce’s touchdown by raising his hands and grinning.

    “It’s a blessing to be here in Kansas City,” Kelce said just weeks prior to one of the greatest plays in his career. “All these years later, I feel like a true Kansas Citian. This is my football home, and to be a part of the success we’ve had here, to help build the culture that Coach Reid created and has set, I couldn’t ask to be put in a better situation.”



    With a slap on the back of the shoulder pads, Kelce turned around and saw Bieniemy, one of the last people to give him a congratulatory embrace. Kelce didn’t want Bieniemy to move toward the locker room before sharing a statement that both men already knew was true.

    “Sixty-fucking-plus minutes!” Kelce told Bieniemy.

    “Plus minutes!” Bieniemy responded.

    “(You can) count on me, dog!” Kelce said. “(You can) count on me, dog!”
     
  4. GoodForAnother

    GoodForAnother well Terry, it sure as shit ain’t sad
    Staff Donor TMB OG
    Kansas State WildcatsKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSporting Kansas CityBig 8 ConferenceFormula 1


    Surrounded by his family — father, Ed, mother, Donna, and brother Jason — Kelce received a call during the third round of the NFL Draft. Kelce, who grew up in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, thought seeing a Missouri area code on his smartphone meant he was going to be selected by the then-St. Louis Rams.
    Begrudgingly, Kelce said hello into his smartphone. He was surprised when he heard Reid’s voice.

    “Listen, are you going to fuck this up?!” Reid said. “Are you going to screw up this opportunity if I take you?!”


    :lovelove:
     
    texasraider and DirtBall like this.
  5. GoodForAnother

    GoodForAnother well Terry, it sure as shit ain’t sad
    Staff Donor TMB OG
    Kansas State WildcatsKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSporting Kansas CityBig 8 ConferenceFormula 1

  6. DirtBall

    DirtBall Who Cares?
    Donor
    Kansas City RoyalsChicago BearsSporting Kansas CityPortland Trail Blazers altNebraska Cornhuskers alt

  7. DirtBall

    DirtBall Who Cares?
    Donor
    Kansas City RoyalsChicago BearsSporting Kansas CityPortland Trail Blazers altNebraska Cornhuskers alt

    This is a good read

     
    MtOread and GoodForAnother like this.
  8. ono

    ono Well-Known Member
    Donor
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSeattle SupersonicsSporting Kansas City

    The shape and bowl design of Arrowhead is so unique and cool and impossible to create today with modern building codes so that's why I hope they just keep renovating it forever rather than moving to some mini-Jerry World some day.
     
    EMAW FC, MtOread and DirtBall like this.
  9. racer

    racer Yuma, where I work in software.
    Donor
    Iowa HawkeyesKansas City ChiefsLas Vegas Golden KnightsWatfordSneakersOlympicsTravel

    They will probably build a sound-reflective overhead canopy or some shit.
    I think that the original design called for a quonset hut on tracks sort of thing to cover it at times.
     
    #3159 racer, Jan 29, 2022
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2022
  10. GoodForAnother

    GoodForAnother well Terry, it sure as shit ain’t sad
    Staff Donor TMB OG
    Kansas State WildcatsKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSporting Kansas CityBig 8 ConferenceFormula 1

    [​IMG]

    It would’ve been the coolest thing ever
     
    EMAW FC, Hatfield, MtOread and 2 others like this.
  11. GoodForAnother

    GoodForAnother well Terry, it sure as shit ain’t sad
    Staff Donor TMB OG
    Kansas State WildcatsKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSporting Kansas CityBig 8 ConferenceFormula 1

    my guess is once the royals move downtown they will build some sort of roof over the top of it kind of like sofi with no enclosed ends
     
    DirtBall likes this.
  12. DirtBall

    DirtBall Who Cares?
    Donor
    Kansas City RoyalsChicago BearsSporting Kansas CityPortland Trail Blazers altNebraska Cornhuskers alt

    Thats pretty awesome. I’ve always been curious what the rolling roof would look like.
     
  13. ono

    ono Well-Known Member
    Donor
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSeattle SupersonicsSporting Kansas City

    Well, might as well pour a mimosa.
     
  14. ono

    ono Well-Known Member
    Donor
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSeattle SupersonicsSporting Kansas City

    I can only imagine the absolute carnage that is going on in the Arrowhead parking lot right now.
     
  15. DirtBall

    DirtBall Who Cares?
    Donor
    Kansas City RoyalsChicago BearsSporting Kansas CityPortland Trail Blazers altNebraska Cornhuskers alt

  16. DirtBall

    DirtBall Who Cares?
    Donor
    Kansas City RoyalsChicago BearsSporting Kansas CityPortland Trail Blazers altNebraska Cornhuskers alt

    Well this is neat

     
  17. ono

    ono Well-Known Member
    Donor
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSeattle SupersonicsSporting Kansas City

    I'm getting Rad AF let's go
     
    EMAW FC, Buster 5000 and DirtBall like this.
  18. Buster 5000

    Buster 5000 "Don't buy a Lincoln you'll look like a pimp."
    Donor
    Iowa HawkeyesChicago CubsLos Angeles LakersKansas City Chiefs

    I’m a little nervous. Go Team.
     
    angus likes this.
  19. ono

    ono Well-Known Member
    Donor
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSeattle SupersonicsSporting Kansas City

    Catch the fucking ball
     
  20. lfriend

    lfriend Well-Known Member
    Missouri TigersKansas City Chiefs

    Do you fire Spagnuolo? Not really his fault they lost today but the D has been bad out loud for long stretches.
     
  21. ono

    ono Well-Known Member
    Donor
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSeattle SupersonicsSporting Kansas City

    If he isn't fired, tell me is address and I light it on fire
     
  22. ono

    ono Well-Known Member
    Donor
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSeattle SupersonicsSporting Kansas City

  23. racer

    racer Yuma, where I work in software.
    Donor
    Iowa HawkeyesKansas City ChiefsLas Vegas Golden KnightsWatfordSneakersOlympicsTravel

    I think the worst part is that this puts Patrick behind Brady’s pace.
     
  24. lfriend

    lfriend Well-Known Member
    Missouri TigersKansas City Chiefs

    I think I'd be more alarmed that you're paying Patrick to be the best QB in the NFL and he just flat out got outplayed by Joe Burrow. Twice.
     
    LeonardWashington and racer like this.
  25. racer

    racer Yuma, where I work in software.
    Donor
    Iowa HawkeyesKansas City ChiefsLas Vegas Golden KnightsWatfordSneakersOlympicsTravel

    It happened 4-5 other times this season as well.
     
  26. DirtBall

    DirtBall Who Cares?
    Donor
    Kansas City RoyalsChicago BearsSporting Kansas CityPortland Trail Blazers altNebraska Cornhuskers alt

    Last time Mahomes lost an AFC champ game in overtime he did pretty well the next year. The Chiefs will be a perennial favorite as long as he stays healthy.
     
  27. racer

    racer Yuma, where I work in software.
    Donor
    Iowa HawkeyesKansas City ChiefsLas Vegas Golden KnightsWatfordSneakersOlympicsTravel

    We need to revamp the defense. I’m back to the point where I love CJ, but he’s not providing the value we need for that price. Clark too. Thornhill just isn’t the same and Mathieu isn’t making the plays he used to make. We’re so bloated on defense.
     
  28. lfriend

    lfriend Well-Known Member
    Missouri TigersKansas City Chiefs

    They need more pass-rush. Ingram was just ok and we were singing his praises for months.

    If Andy wants to get back to the SB, I think he has to flush Spagnuolo and go after Fangio as DC.
     
  29. ono

    ono Well-Known Member
    Donor
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSeattle SupersonicsSporting Kansas City

    We tried to run the ball a lot. Just ducking don’t. You have the best qb of all time, throw bombs
     
  30. racer

    racer Yuma, where I work in software.
    Donor
    Iowa HawkeyesKansas City ChiefsLas Vegas Golden KnightsWatfordSneakersOlympicsTravel

    We were running the ball at 5.8 ypc so I don’t hate it
     
    All_Luck and hawkeyeOUTeast like this.
  31. Andy Reocho

    Andy Reocho Please don't get lost in the sauce
    Staff Donor TMB OG
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsNewcastle UnitedBig 8 ConferenceFormula 1

    Sure am glad we stuck with throwing bombs.
     
    racer likes this.
  32. Andy Reocho

    Andy Reocho Please don't get lost in the sauce
    Staff Donor TMB OG
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsNewcastle UnitedBig 8 ConferenceFormula 1

    Local news station posts stupid social media message

    More at 10
     
    Sir Patrick Stewart likes this.
  33. MtOread

    MtOread chopped and scrooged
    Donor
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsBig 8 Conference

  34. MtOread

    MtOread chopped and scrooged
    Donor
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsBig 8 Conference

    Bummer about the result, because the vibes were off the charts in my neck of Lot G yesterday morning.
     
  35. lfriend

    lfriend Well-Known Member
    Missouri TigersKansas City Chiefs

    They will be fine against the cap this year. FA looks like mostly wasteland.

    Frank Clark and Hitchens are obvious releases.

    Sorenson is definitely gone and maybe Niemann? I don't think Spags let's all of his slow shitty white players go at once.

    Nnadi and Reed can go too. Ingram is whatever.

    I think Sneed can replace HB. I like HB but we can't keep everyone.

    Ward is about the only one I'd try to keep.

    Shopping list:
    RB
    WR
    RT
    DEx2
    LB
    DT
    Corner
    Depth at S

    Wr2/slot, DE and corner I think are the big priorities this year.
     
  36. GoodForAnother

    GoodForAnother well Terry, it sure as shit ain’t sad
    Staff Donor TMB OG
    Kansas State WildcatsKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSporting Kansas CityBig 8 ConferenceFormula 1

    the fact that nfl writers need his contract explained to them twice a year is very funny to me
     
    racer likes this.
  37. Andy Reocho

    Andy Reocho Please don't get lost in the sauce
    Staff Donor TMB OG
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsNewcastle UnitedBig 8 ConferenceFormula 1

    Frank Clark had 1 pressure yesterday. Fucking YIKES.
     
  38. MtOread

    MtOread chopped and scrooged
    Donor
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsBig 8 Conference

  39. racer

    racer Yuma, where I work in software.
    Donor
    Iowa HawkeyesKansas City ChiefsLas Vegas Golden KnightsWatfordSneakersOlympicsTravel

    Just pile it on
     
  40. GoodForAnother

    GoodForAnother well Terry, it sure as shit ain’t sad
    Staff Donor TMB OG
    Kansas State WildcatsKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsSporting Kansas CityBig 8 ConferenceFormula 1

    stop paying defensive linemen so much and just stack all the talent on offense who even cares anymore
     
    racer likes this.
  41. MtOread

    MtOread chopped and scrooged
    Donor
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsBig 8 Conference



    This is how I become friends with Mecole and eventually Mahomes.
     
    racer and DirtBall like this.
  42. rcragg82

    rcragg82 Well-Known Member
    Donor

    I actually disagree with this a lot. When our offense was clicking the last few weeks is because we had a semblance of a balanced offense. We were running the ball for 5-6 yards a carry and then McKinnon didn't see the field in the Q3.

    The Bengals were dropping an 8 men in coverage all second half and our lack of a 2nd WR was killing us. I truly believe if we ran on when we were on the 5 yard line at the end of the 4th, we win the game. Our lack of being able to run the ball and having quick, short passes (slants) killed us yesterday and quite a few games this year.
     
    Andy Reocho and All_Luck like this.
  43. rcragg82

    rcragg82 Well-Known Member
    Donor

    I would add we actually had the ability to run, our OL is pretty good at blocking for it but Andy prefers to pass 80% of the time. I get that.....except for when teams dare us to beat them running the ball like yesterday and we don't. The Bengals made second half adjustments and we did not. I wish we pounded McKinnon and CEH all second half with our lead until the Bengals came out of putting an extra man in coverage.
     
    UCFkc123, All_Luck and TimJimothy like this.
  44. Andy Reocho

    Andy Reocho Please don't get lost in the sauce
    Staff Donor TMB OG
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsNewcastle UnitedBig 8 ConferenceFormula 1

    Looks like Jarran Reed won't be back, which is just fine by me.
     
  45. racer

    racer Yuma, where I work in software.
    Donor
    Iowa HawkeyesKansas City ChiefsLas Vegas Golden KnightsWatfordSneakersOlympicsTravel

    I think he did some good things, but I’m not mad about it.
     
  46. racer

    racer Yuma, where I work in software.
    Donor
    Iowa HawkeyesKansas City ChiefsLas Vegas Golden KnightsWatfordSneakersOlympicsTravel

    Step 1 go get ogbah
    Step 2 hold onto your butts because we’re cutting hill
    Step 3 go get a top tier WR and DB
    Step 4 once it hits June cut clark.
    Step 5 move hitchens
    Step 6 get a wr2
    Step 7 win
     
  47. MtOread

    MtOread chopped and scrooged
    Donor
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsBig 8 Conference

    As in, Tyreek Hill?
     
    racer likes this.
  48. Andy Reocho

    Andy Reocho Please don't get lost in the sauce
    Staff Donor TMB OG
    Kansas JayhawksKansas City RoyalsKansas City ChiefsNewcastle UnitedBig 8 ConferenceFormula 1

    Highly doubt they’re getting rid of Reek anytime soon
     
    racer likes this.
  49. racer

    racer Yuma, where I work in software.
    Donor
    Iowa HawkeyesKansas City ChiefsLas Vegas Golden KnightsWatfordSneakersOlympicsTravel

    My case involves saving 18m against the cap and also that our days of using taking the top off as a primary offensive strategy are mostly done. I think we could possibly find some differently suited weapons for the money and be more efficient overall.
    But I’m not Brett Veach so.