Official Cycling Thread: TDF

Discussion in 'The Mainboard' started by goheels10, Jan 2, 2012.

  1. MA

    MA Surprisingly normal looking
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    Not hard to see why he's so popular in the peloton:
     
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  2. MA

    MA Surprisingly normal looking
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    Also is it an unpopular opinion to say that the TdF has the worst ending weekend of any major event? These glorious mountain stages during the week when everyone's at work, and then a ITT/Paris combo with 10 mins of worthwhile action when everyone's free to watch TV.

    I've always found it such a waste.
     
  3. a.tramp

    a.tramp Insubordinate and churlish
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    Just rewatch the best 2 mountain stages on Saturday and Sunday
     
  4. MA

    MA Surprisingly normal looking
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    I mean I'll be happy watching that stuff cause I've watched everything regardless of what day it was.

    Just seems like there's such potential on the weekend of getting new fans of the sport and it's absolutely wasted with the current format. Maybe nothing can be done about the Paris finish, but Saturday should 100% be a mountain finish stage where we see these guys attack each other till It's done.
     
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  5. Wicket

    Wicket Fan: ND, PSV, Pool FC, Cricket, Urquel, Dog Crew
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    thats how they try and plan the first 2 weekends usually. The ride into paris is a tradition I cant see them braking with and personally I like the ITT on the saturday. ITTs are fun to me although id be fine with a nice mountain stage as well. I think the TTT should be dropped for another ITT though. Also, if you are doing cobblestones in the thing make it substantial enough for riders to make an actual difference there. Dont just make it a lottery of broken bones. (lottery of broken bones sounds like a solid bankd name by the way)
     
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  6. colonelrascals

    colonelrascals Mayonnaise-colored Benz, I push miracle whips
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    the parade to paris is one of my favorite cycling traditions.
     
  7. MA

    MA Surprisingly normal looking
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    Craddock should've gotten most combative rider. @ me.
     
  8. MA

    MA Surprisingly normal looking
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    Great attack from Lampaert. Have to think Bora fucked that a bit with Oss ending up as a launch pad for it.

    Was always gonna be tough for Sagan with his injuries. Looked like he just lost the wheel thereat the end before the sprint.
     
  9. MA

    MA Surprisingly normal looking
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  10. timo

    timo Vuela, vuela, vuela vuela sin parar
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  11. Sterling A

    Sterling A Well-Known Member

    Idk how many of you saw the "behind the scenes" video that NBC SN did about how they can possibly move their sets/semi's/people/cords/cars every single day to be ready for the next race but it's incredible.

    What other sporting event in the world do you have to travel dozens and sometimes hundreds of miles each day for 3 weeks? Really wish TDF was appreciated more around the world
     
  12. goheels10

    goheels10 Well-Known Member
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    its part of the beauty of the sport, but it also keeps it from growing more. just hearing the transportation cost that some of these teams have to pay is otherworldly.
     
  13. Sterling A

    Sterling A Well-Known Member

    Do you have any stats/articles/videos about that? Would love to learn more
     
  14. The_411

    The_411 Well-Known Member

    They had to change it as they were getting too many spectators for weekend mountain top finishes.
     
  15. colonelrascals

    colonelrascals Mayonnaise-colored Benz, I push miracle whips
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    Egan bernal had a nasty crash today
     
  16. goheels10

    goheels10 Well-Known Member
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  17. goheels10

    goheels10 Well-Known Member
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    i will have to track it down. I read a big profile on it a few years back.
     
  18. Sterling A

    Sterling A Well-Known Member

    ? sorry but what race is there right now?
     
  19. goheels10

    goheels10 Well-Known Member
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    lots of races going on at the moment.

    Tour of Poland
    Tour of Utah
    Vuelta a Burgos
    Classica San Sebastien was this weekend... that's where Bernal crashed. Had to have nose and mouth surgery.
     
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  20. goheels10

    goheels10 Well-Known Member
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  21. a.tramp

    a.tramp Insubordinate and churlish
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  22. Duck Smoker

    Duck Smoker I feel like I'm in a Lexus
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    I climb on talus like that all the time.:ohnoes:

    Terrible story. I just bought a satellite beacon just for a situation like this since I'm frequently solo.
     
  23. nofatchildren

    nofatchildren Bull Moose Till I Die
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    Costa had basically retired from pro cycling, but damn that still sucks.
     
  24. goheels10

    goheels10 Well-Known Member
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  25. colonelrascals

    colonelrascals Mayonnaise-colored Benz, I push miracle whips
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  26. MA

    MA Surprisingly normal looking
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    Are any of you following this blow up over Gerraint saying helmets should be compulsory?

    I had no idea there were so many anti-helmet people out there.
     
  27. nofatchildren

    nofatchildren Bull Moose Till I Die
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    He was talking about the British government making helmets compulsory for anyone on a bike. People always get their panties in a wad if somebody suggests the government take away “muh freedoms.” Even in the UK.

    Having said that, I don’t think it’s necessary to force everyone to wear a helmet if they don’t want to.
     
  28. MA

    MA Surprisingly normal looking
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    The people I'm talking about aren't just anti-compulsion, they're actual anti-helmet people. Like they think helmets are either ineffective or actually put cyclists in more danger.

    The anti-compulsion stuff is interesting to read as well though. A lot of what I've read is how compulsory policies decrease bike use, which leads to adverse effects. But to me that just says there should be more focus on getting people to continue riding, marketing campaigns and such.

    It's a very interesting topic.
     
  29. goheels10

    goheels10 Well-Known Member
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    sounds like Joe Dombrowski is leaving EF and headed to Sunweb. As much as it sucks to see him go, I'm happy for him to go there to support Dumoulin.
     
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  30. Jean-Ralphio

    Jean-Ralphio A real toe-tapper
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    its not that long ago when riders only had to wear a helmet downhill.
     
  31. MA

    MA Surprisingly normal looking
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  32. MA

    MA Surprisingly normal looking
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  33. timo

    timo Vuela, vuela, vuela vuela sin parar
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  34. MA

    MA Surprisingly normal looking
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  35. goheels10

    goheels10 Well-Known Member
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    fuck Valverde.
     
  36. nofatchildren

    nofatchildren Bull Moose Till I Die
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    Remco Evanpoel pulled off the double Junior World Championship. Won both the ITT and Road Race.

    At one point In the road race he crashed and lost like two minutes to the peloton. He solo'd back himself, and then just rode everyone off his wheel when he got to the front and won by 9+ minutes.

    His already moving to the World Tour and riding with Quick Step next year at 19.
     
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  37. colonelrascals

    colonelrascals Mayonnaise-colored Benz, I push miracle whips
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    Remco is a beast
     
  38. MA

    MA Surprisingly normal looking
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  39. Sterling A

    Sterling A Well-Known Member

    Book excerpt: Peter Sagan on sprinting
    Peter SaganNovember 14, 2018


    In his new book, Peter Sagan explains why he doesn't like sprinting with a lead-out train and how he manages to always time his jump right.

    Editor’s note: This is an excerpt from Peter Sagan‘s new biography, “My World,” available on preorder from VeloPress, shipping November 16, 2018.

    If there is one question I’ve been asked most often in my career, it’s probably: Are you a sprinter? Or maybe it’s: Why are you such a nutcase? But no, probably still: Are you a sprinter?

    The answer is no. I am an all-rounder. I can sprint as well or as badly as I can climb or time trial; it’s just that sprinting comes a bit easier to me.

    I’ve still got the jump I had when I first turned pro. When we do the various tests and studies that we have to do for the team, for the UCI, for the anti-doping guys, on a good day my watts-per-kilo ratio is still as good as it’s ever been, so I can still pump out a bit of power. However, I turned pro very young. I’m still only 28, so it could go at any moment. Cycling history is littered with sprinters who had one or two stellar seasons before they seemed to lose their edge. These days, it’s less common. Guys like Andre Greipel and Mark Cavendish have been among the fastest year in, year out for many seasons. They say that Mario Cipollini was like that too: good every year, despite the passing of time. You can’t be quick for a year or two and retire with 57 — 57! — grand tour stage wins to your name, as Cipollini did. Maybe the decrease in doping has changed things? It could well be that. There aren’t as many mystifying performances as there used to be.

    The thing to remember is that every sprint is different: One hundred riders with one hundred different stories is one thing, but the variables in the sprint are huge. Most big bunch sprints come in grand tours, so by their very nature, they vary, as they have a different route every year, every day. Even if a stage finishes in a town the race has visited before, there is no guarantee the line will be in the same place, or the route will cover the same corners or rises and falls. There’s also the unpredictable element of the weather: Rain is the most obvious hazard with corners offering the terrifying jolt of sketchy terrain and a slipping tire, but every sprint is also affected by wind strength and direction, something you might not be able to appreciate from the view on TV.

    Crashes, or just fear of crashes, play a huge part in sprinting, of course, and you have to live by your wits a little bit. Being nervous about crashing often becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, so it is key to stay relaxed. After all, you don’t need to be sprinting to fall off. Chris Froome once crashed into a race organizer seconds into a time trial, and we’ve all had an embarrassing tumble trying to clip out of the pedals at one time or another. It’ll just hurt more and look more spectacular if you do it 100 meters from the finish line at the Tour de France.

    I don’t like sprinting from a lead-out train. It stresses me out, which is the last thing I need. Everybody is relying on you, and you have to fight for your position on the wheel in front miles before the finish. I don’t like fighting in the bunch. Life is too short. That’s just wasted energy when you’re going to need all of it later. I prefer to just ride and keep my eyes on what’s happening. That’s what I’ll have been doing all day anyway; it’s just getting a bit quicker by this stage. If you want to win a monument like Flanders or Roubaix, for example, the last 100 kilometers will be like the last 10 kilometers of a grand tour stage for me: Ride carefully, ride positively, keep your eyes open.

    [​IMG]


    It’s a percentages game too. If I’m left to do my own thing, without anything going drastically wrong like a crash or a course diversion, I usually finish in the top five of a sprint, without needing to weigh up the individuals I’m sprinting against. I don’t want to sound immodest, but if I imagined I was somebody else watching the race, it’s realistic to expect the UCI world champion, who is known to be able to sprint pretty well, to be up there at the finish if he’s in the lead group. That’s just normal. With a lead-out train, you take much of your own fate out of your own hands. Sure, it’s nice for someone like Mark Cavendish when that Omega Pharma-Quick-Step train he used to have with Tony Martin, Mark Renshaw, and everybody drops him off with 200 meters to go, but there are so many things that can go wrong. You lose the wheel. Another team has a faster train, and your guys get burned off early. Your last guy misjudges the distance. The likely result is yes, in theory, you may have a better chance of winning, but you also have a greater chance of going nowhere. I prefer to do my own thing, and if somebody is faster than me, then he is faster than me. No problem. But I won’t be far behind him. And I like podiums, even when I’m not on the top step. I’d still rather be there than in the bus, arguing with the team about what went wrong.

    I suppose, in an ideal world, rather than a lead-out, I’ll have a teammate nearby, just in case I can’t handle things on my own. Especially in the national team, that has worked really well, with either my brother Juraj or Michal Kolař close at hand in difficult moments. One man — one good man — can get on the front and drive a group along to dissuade attacks, can drag an escapee back or give up a wheel or even his bike if I am struck by some act of God at the sharp end of a race.

    One of my mantras is that it’s good to have a plan, but plans don’t always work. There is an old story from the salesman’s manual: You’re a traveling salesman, and you walk in to see a customer who has bought the same thing off you many times in the past, and he says he doesn’t want any today. What do you do? You sell him something else. And that’s what I have to do, too. Sell my rivals something else.

    Basically, I will try to ride as “normally” as possible until the last couple of kilometers. The most common shape for stages in grand tours now is that the first hour of the day is a crazy rush to get somebody in a break; then it calms down. With the better communication between the team cars, riders, and race organization, people have become very experienced at knowing what is needed to bring that long escape back. And you don’t want it caught too soon, as that would just encourage some other guys to go, and it gets messy again. You may feel it’s unlucky when a break gets recaptured within 2 kilometers of the line after 100 kilometers out in the wind, but it’s not really luck; it’s the masterplan working.

    [​IMG]
    On stage 2 of the 2018 Tour de France, Peter Sagan took the victory with a bike throw over Sonny Cobrelli. Photo: Jim Fryer / BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com



    So, we’re all together with about 2,000 meters to go. Yes, somebody may break away, and you have to be alert to who it is, but if the bunch is traveling fast enough and there are sprinters’ teams and lead-out trains with a lot to lose, it is unlikely to succeed. Stay cool and play close attention. With 500 meters left, I will pick the wheel of the rider who I think is most likely to give me the best route to the line.

    This is another moment where being a solo artiste is a big advantage. Let’s say that at the team meeting this morning, you agreed on the order of the lead-out, who was going to pull over when, and when you would be let loose at the line. Let’s say you’ve looked at the course in the road book that the race organizers give us all, and we settle on 300 meters as the ideal point to begin the sprint.

    OK. Now I’m there, with 500 meters to go, the crowd is screaming, banging on the barriers with anything they can find, and the wind is in my ears as I hit 50 kilometers per hour. Suddenly, I realize there’s a headwind that we hadn’t planned for. No way do I want to hit the front at 300 meters, I’ll just get buffeted and then swamped. How can I get that message to everybody in front of me, a-reeling and a-rocking as we already are, holding each others’ wheels in the mayhem and the maelstrom of noise? No chance. That is one plan that can’t be changed.

    My agent, Giovanni Lombardi, was one of the lead-out men for Mario Cipollini when the Lion King was in the rainbow jersey of world champion. He told me a story that in one of Super Mario’s earlier teams, they had both Cipo and Johan Museeuw, who was also really fast in those days. They claimed to have a system of whistles they could use to communicate. I find that hard to believe. There’s no way you could hear, no way to change plans. It might have worked if they had some sheep to round up, perhaps.

    To be honest, when it’s a messy sprint with the different trains getting in each other’s way, breakaways being caught, lead-out men pulling over, that’s when it suits me best. Without anybody else to worry about, it’s easy for me to change plans.

    [​IMG]
    Sagan won stage 4 of the 2018 Tour Down Under. Photo: Tim De Waele | Getty Images



    Take Australia in 2018, for instance. It was my first race of the year, literally the first time the rainbow jersey had been seen since the podium in Norway. I had no condition and no real expectation. I was there to get fitter in the warm weather, to chill out away from the media frenzy in Europe, and to enjoy a bit of bike racing. The real training would begin in the Sierra Nevada in Spain, a month later. In that Australian race, if I’d had a train, I would have said, “Forget it, guys, not today; we’re not here to win this one.” Or if I’d not felt too bad and felt I owed the team a result, we could have organized, and I would have stressed about staying with them and not letting them bury themselves for me without good reason. With half a dozen hammers battering away for your benefit, you want to make sure that if you’re the nail, you’d better be sharp.

    None of that, thank goodness. I just enjoyed the ride in warm weather, wearing shorts and short sleeves. All of a sudden, there were two kilometers left. I got focused, and the rainbow jersey had its first win of the year. Nice.

    There are some basic rules to follow. If it’s a downhill finish, or fast because of a tailwind, I like to start farther back from the front than usual, so you can hit top speed before you get to the front. That creates a bit more momentum and makes you harder to catch. If there’s a headwind, then you want to stay covered up until the last possible moment. Preferably, get on the wheel of the sprinter with the most powerful train, as they are likely to drop him off earlier than he would like, and you can use his speed for an ultra-late charge as he begins to die away in the wind.

    Uphill sprints need fewer tactics. It’s usually just a macho strength battle, and the strongest guy of the day will be the winner, which isn’t always the case in other finishes. If it gets too steep, I am likely to get out-punched by the real climbers … I’m thinking about “Purito” Rodriguez and Chris Froome when the Tour de France finished on the Mur de Huy, for example.

    Apart from that, I love those messy sprints when everybody is all over the road, and I can duck and dive my way to the line. I’ve never ridden the Giro d’Italia, and maybe I will one day, but I have a feeling I’d like the finishes there. They always seem to have a 90-degree bend 50 meters from the line or something crazy like that, finishes so narrow you could reach out and touch both barriers. Plus, they tend to go through the finish line and then do a lap of the town before the end of the stage, so you can have a good look at it in advance. One day, maybe.

    So, that’s all there is to it. You have all my secrets. Not really secrets, just common sense, but it’s all I’ve got to give you. It’s up to you now!
     
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  40. Sterling A

    Sterling A Well-Known Member

    Tour is stronger than ever despite rocky 2018 edition
    Andrew Hood November 12, 2018


    The 2018 Tour de France had its setbacks and frustrations, but some insiders believe the race is stronger than it has ever been.

    Despite the challenges that the Tour de France faced in 2018, there are signs that the race is stronger than at any point in its history. The race’s media footprint still reaches across the globe. Its value has enabled parent company ASO to consolidate its power in cycling. And many of the sport’s biggest sponsors cue up for an opportunity to participate in the event. “Thirty years ago, the Tour was a very big French race in France,” said longtime journalist Francois Thomazeau, who’s covered nearly 30 Tours. “Since then, it has truly become a global event that draws in millions of people every day.”

    The 2018 Tour de France may be remembered for the controversy which swirled around Team Sky, and for the smaller crowds and dip in TV ratings. But by nearly every metric — from those same TV ratings and crowds, to sponsor engagement and the quality of the field — the Tour still towers above every other cycling race on the calendar.

    Jonathan Vaughters, who has long fought to change cycling’s business model, said that when he pitches potential sponsors, he promotes his team’s media metrics from the Tour de France.

    “From a media impressions standpoint, the Tour dwarfs everything by a huge order of magnitude,” Vaughters said. “[Other races] are not even close. The Giro is only 10 to 20 percent bigger from a media impression standpoint than we get with Paris-Nice or the Dauphiné.”

    That almost monopolistic stranglehold on the sport’s center of gravity has been an ongoing and sometimes bitter debate for generations.

    Teams still grumble about the Tour’s dominion over the sport and unwillingness to share in the riches it generates from television revenue. Critics say as popular and profitable as the Tour is now, it could be even more so if ASO embraced a more integrated business arrangement with the larger cycling community.

    Until Madame Marie-Odile, widow of ASO founder Émilien Amaury, decides to sell the privately held media company, that likely won’t change.

    And ASO has adopted an aggressive strategy for expanding its reach, thanks to the Tour’s success. Over the past decade, ASO has purchased — and saved — such races as Paris-Nice, the Critérium du Dauphiné, and the Vuelta a España. ASO holds marketing agreements with the Santos Tour Down Under and the Amgen Tour of California. It also has expanded into profitable new markets with Britain’s Tour of Yorkshire and the Arctic Race of Norway.

    This summer ASO also revived the Tour of Germany in an effort to tap into cycling’s biggest European market. The acquisitions are made possible by ASO’s revenues from the Tour de France.

    Within the pro peloton, the Tour still reigns supreme. Success or failure at the race makes or breaks a rider’s season. It’s so important, in fact, that teams now regularly choose either a sprinter or a general classification rider, where in years past teams often brought both.

    “The Tour is our big global event in cycling,” said Mitchelton-Scott sport director Matt White. “The Tour has a different feel than other races. The Tour is the event that put cycling on the map. Of course, every team or organization wants to win the Tour.”

    The allure of the Tour even helped BMC Racing survive. When longtime manager Jim Ochowicz, who previously ran 7-Eleven and Motorola, faced sponsorship woes at the end of the 2018 season, he leveraged his most powerful asset: A ticket to the Tour de France.

    With his WorldTour license in hand — a guaranteed entry to the Tour — Ochowicz struck a deal with Polish shoemaker Dariusz Milek, who has bankrolled the CCC-branded team for nearly two decades. Despite racing the Giro d’Italia and other major races, Milek never got an invite to the Tour. Ochowicz’s WorldTour license and its invaluable access to the Tour sealed the agreement.

    “Sponsors want to be in the Tour de France,” Ochowicz said. “They wanted to go with a WorldTour team. There are only 18 of them. [The license] helped close the deal.”

    The inspired Tour founder Henri Desgrange might have been lucky that he thought of the grand tour formula first. Beyond chance, though, the Tour de France is still the race that fuels professional cycling and defines what stage racing is all about.
     
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  41. MA

    MA Surprisingly normal looking
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    Paul Sherwen has passed. He and Phil were the first commentators I heard and I enjoyed him most out of that pair. Only 62 as well.
     
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  42. gopack2104

    gopack2104 Well-Known Member
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    Have we heard anything about a cause yet?
     
  43. ground mullet

    ground mullet Well hung ember
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    Heart failure while asleep
     
  44. MA

    MA Surprisingly normal looking
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  45. Sterling A

    Sterling A Well-Known Member

    Hallelujah

    Christmas comes early
     
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  46. goheels10

    goheels10 Well-Known Member
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    twas out with the flu yesterday. YAY BYE SKY
     
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  47. The_411

    The_411 Well-Known Member

    This thread went to sleep a bit.

    Been chomping at the bit for Remco’s pro debut and so far so good.

    He needs to develop acceleration for climbing. Could stand to lose 5-6 kilos. Sounds ridiculous for a bike rider but there are guys at 6’0 who weigh mid to high 60s
     
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  48. goheels10

    goheels10 Well-Known Member
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    sorry about that. been super busy.

    Remco is so fucking good. scary to think what he could be. Just wish he was on a different team.
     
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