Scuba Diving

Discussion in 'The Mainboard' started by dblplay1212, May 22, 2009.

  1. Vito Corleone

    Vito Corleone What if Adam Thielen was black?
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    Own everything except a tank. I've gotten about 50 dives off of mine. I'm not a gear queer though. Could give decent recommendations for most stuff if needed if you just want basic and sturdy stuff
     
  2. Arrec Bardwin

    Arrec Bardwin He ain’t me, he can’t be me
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    Bare minimum you should own your mask and snorkel imo. Personally don't like renting regulator either, prefer my mouthpiece to be comfortable. Everything else depends on how often you go.
     
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  3. WillieHuff

    WillieHuff RACKEM
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    Got Certified at Vortex Springs in January around 2002. Air temp was 24 water temp was 60's. I've never been so happy to get back into the water.
     
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  4. BayouMafia

    BayouMafia this that slumdog millionaire Bollywood flow
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    my wife's cousin is a dive master on Ambergris Caye, Belize. What a life. He dives The Blue Hole three times a week.

    did the PADI Discover Scuba course in July with him, then did several dives on the reef there. Absolutely beautiful and we're hooked. Taking the classes over the next few months and will probably do our certification dives down there this coming spring/summer
     
  5. Vito Corleone

    Vito Corleone What if Adam Thielen was black?
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    That would be the best life I could think of
     
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  6. BP

    BP Bout to Regulate.
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    Got certified this year in AZ. Was able to get thru in time to go to Iceland and dive Silfra. The tucson shop goes to San Carlos and San Diego every month. A guy I work with is on a ship at Truk Lagoon at the moment. Have only done 12 dives just been really busy this year hope to get more into it in the fall or next year. Really amazing to be down deep and you a fish just look at each other as you're swimming by.
     
  7. dallasdawg

    dallasdawg does the tin man have a sheet metal cock?
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    We need the okay emoji for a thread icon

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    Taques my love
     
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  8. pez

    pez Poon Pooning
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    Truk is by and far my no 1 dream spot to dive.
     
  9. Cousin Eddie

    Cousin Eddie Lookin for the place called Lee Ho Fook's
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    Anyone been diving in Costa Rica, specifically near Manuel Antonio?
     
  10. Arrec Bardwin

    Arrec Bardwin He ain’t me, he can’t be me
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    Pretty meh for diving depending on what you're used to. Went while on our honeymoon. I'm spoiled by the Caymans though. Still an awesome location, did a jet ski tour in the park and it was pretty awesome.
     
  11. Kevintensity

    Kevintensity "you're full of beans and so is your old man"
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    Do you have to know how to swim to scuba dive?
     
  12. Harvey Updyke

    Harvey Updyke RTR!!!!!1!

    Crawl > Walk > Run
    Swim > Snorkle > Dive
     
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  13. infected donkey

    infected donkey Arkansas Razorbacks
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    Scuba is like lazy swimming. You more or less just kick then drift.
     
  14. Kevintensity

    Kevintensity "you're full of beans and so is your old man"
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    That's good, just checking out for the OP

    [​IMG]
     
  15. ElCunado

    ElCunado 7 dollars worth of Hoobastank
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    Agreed on the meh. Long boat ride, tough current, and vis is hit or miss.
     
  16. Vito Corleone

    Vito Corleone What if Adam Thielen was black?
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    Will be Key West and Key Largo this week. Has anyone ever been there?

    Would love to do night diving but it sounds like divers from the area think the 75 degree water is too cold for it so there aren't many options
     
  17. stangd

    stangd I love scotch. Scotchy, scotch, scotch
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    It was fun, but I thought it was going to be better.
     
  18. stangd

    stangd I love scotch. Scotchy, scotch, scotch
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    The Vandenberg is a must, you will really enjoy it, i've dove it a few times and have never been disappointed. There are a few places to dive in Key West, but the best diving is in the Keys further up. 75 degree water is awesome, I also dive the florida springs all the time....so refreshing.


    Key largo is where its at...The USS Duane and Bibb are two of my most favorite dives, I also like the Spiegel Grove but it's getting played out for me. You gotta get your boat captain to take you to some of the non touristy spots. There are some really good hidden reefs around....
     
  19. BamaNug

    BamaNug Want to retire right MEOW
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  20. BamaNug

    BamaNug Want to retire right MEOW
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    Do we have many scuba divers on here? Just signed up to get certified over New Years down in the Galapagos.

    I'm a mediocre swimmer, never been much of a diver, even with a snorkel. My plan is to start swimming a lot and get pretty good in the water before getting certified.

    They require being able to swim 100 yards in open water, as well as tread water for 15 minutes. I'm confident I could do both of those, but it'd be incredibly inefficient and not pretty. Need to get better.
     
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  21. Taffy

    Taffy Token Brit poster
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    Compulsory:
    [​IMG]
     
  22. BayouMafia

    BayouMafia this that slumdog millionaire Bollywood flow
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    bump to merge threads
     
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  23. WillieHuff

    WillieHuff RACKEM
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    The better in shape and swimmer you are the slower you will burn through your tank aka you can stay down longer at beginner'ish depths (30-40 feet). Which not to rant or anything but I've never really cared about going deep that much, depending on your site you can see just as much in 10 feet as you can at 100. The only times I've done a wall dive my visibility was shit.
     
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  24. stangd

    stangd I love scotch. Scotchy, scotch, scotch
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    Where all have you done wall dives? I have done a few and have enjoyed them. I'm the opposite, I love to dive deep....I like the wreck dives.
     
  25. WillieHuff

    WillieHuff RACKEM
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    Just caymans. It was just bad luck because the few times I've done them there were waves hitting some rocks nearby and I assume that was stirring up the sediment.

    Its also been forever since I have dove, however I'm moving to miami in a few weeks so I'm definitely going to take a refresher course down there. If it tells you how long ago it was since I dove my certification is through the YMCA which is no longer an accrediting organization. I forget the name of the new one that will give me a replacement license.
     
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  26. BamaNug

    BamaNug Want to retire right MEOW
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    Much obliged
     
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  27. pockets

    pockets Lesser-Known Member
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    Dude did you just spend your afternoons at The Track smoking weed with all the mexicans that went to Foley HS? How is that possible being from GS?
     
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  28. BamaNug

    BamaNug Want to retire right MEOW
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    Makes sense, thanks. I'm in very good shape, just not a strong swimmer. Have ~6 months to fix that, though.
     
  29. BamaNug

    BamaNug Want to retire right MEOW
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    I was always on a boat brah. Aristocratic GS things.

    But yea I don't really have much of an excuse, considering where I grew up
     
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  30. pockets

    pockets Lesser-Known Member
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    I was just kidding. If you have confidence and stay calm in the water you'll be just fine, especially since you're in good shape.
     
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  31. Vito Corleone

    Vito Corleone What if Adam Thielen was black?
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    Diving in water is more about form and control than athleticism. If you know how to control breathing and have a good sense of feel and motion, you can stay in the water a lot longer than someone that is for example a fast swimmer
     
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  32. THF

    THF Banned From Hogville for Being an Ass
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    This. With the weight belt on you are still pretty buoyant and can control the amount of rise or fall you have. The trick is to get it to where you free float based on your inhale and exhale.

    I love diving and wish I could do it more often.
     
  33. BP

    BP Bout to Regulate.
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  34. Prospector

    Prospector I am not a new member
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    Latest Generation of Lionfish-Hunting Robot Can Find and Zap More Fish Than Ever
    By Evan Ackerman
    Posted 14 Mar 2019 | 19:30 GMT
    [​IMG]
    Image: RSE
    It’s always cool to see lionfish while snorkeling or scuba diving. They’re spectacular-looking, and because they’re covered in flamboyant spines, they’re usually secure enough in their invincibility that they’ll mostly just sit there and let you get close to them. Lionfish don’t make for very good oceanic neighbors, though, and in places where they’re an invasive species and have few native predators (like most of the Atlantic coast of the United States), they do their best to eat anything that moves while breeding almost continuously. From a 2010 Oregon State study on a reef in the Bahamas:

    A single lionfish per reef reduced young juvenile fish populations by 79 percent in only a five-week period. Many species were affected, including cardinalfish, parrotfish, damselfish, and others. One large lionfish was observed consuming 20 small fish in a 30-minute period.

    As horrible as this is, lionfish have the right idea about successfully controlling fish populations—if you want fewer of something, eat it. Lionfish fillets are tasty, and there have been concerted efforts to raise demand for the meat for conservation purposes. The hope is that a robust consumer market will incentivize lionfish hunting, and that humans with spearguns will become the predators that invasive lionfish need.


    The trouble with this is where many lionfish hang out and breed, which is too deep for most recreational divers. This is where Robots in Service of the Environment (RSE) comes in. Founded by Colin Angle of iRobot, RSE has been developing remote controlled underwater robots that can efficiently hunt, stun, and capture lionfish at depths of 400 feet for up to 60 minutes at a time, and today they’re introducing their third-generation robot.

    [​IMG]
    Image: RSE
    The RSE Guardian LF1 Mark 3 UUV has a modular design featuring: 1. Stunning panels; 2. Capture system; 3. Power enclosure; 4. Main ROV enclosure; 5. Surface tether; 6. 6-DoF navigation system; 7. Stun enclosure; 8. Fish retention tines.
    The RSE Guardian LF1 Mark 3 prototype is a modular unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV) designed specifically for lionfish hunting. Two paddles at the front of the robot can zap any lionfish that swims between them, stunning it instantly. The incapacitated fish is then sucked into the body of the robot, and up to 10 fish can be captured before the robot needs to return to the surface. The battery, sensing, propulsion, and nearly everything else is contained in modules bolted to the chassis of the robot, making repairs and upgrades simple. Control is fully manual at the moment, and dependent on a tether to the surface, although RSE is exploring how assistive autonomy can make piloting easier.

    [​IMG]

    For more, we spoke with Adam Cantor, RSE’s director of engineering, via email.

    IEEE Spectrum: You say “in order to truly impact the lionfish population there will need to be a lot of robots in the water hunting and capturing the fish wherever they are.” What does “truly impact” mean, and what does “a lot of robots” mean?

    Adam Cantor: Our robots are capable of hunting the lionfish at their critical action depth (where they feed/breed.) Theoretically, no lionfish would be safe from the Guardian ROV, and over time the lionfish could be beaten back from shallow waters, down to depths where it is too cold and too dark for them to hunt and breed effectively. Even if not eradicated outright, this would slow their spread enough for them to be assimilated into existing food chains.

    When we say, “a lot of robots” we mean that anyone with a vested interest in protecting an ecosystem—dive charters, fishermen, conservationists, etc.—has access to easy-to-use, capable, and effective hardware with which they can impact the large scale spread of lionfish from invading their local reefs and sanctuaries. It doesn’t take daily missions to keep a reef clear if you can stun and capture lionfish at their critical action depth. A single robot could be run every day at different sites, bringing in tons of lionfish for sale, and protecting square miles of reef. The east coast of the united states is 2,000 miles long. To make an impact we need thousands of robots in operation, not millions, and we think that is a reachable goal.

    Your website suggests that for your business model to be successful, several things must become true, including consistent demand for lionfish meat and fishermen willing to purchase and operate robots to fulfill this demand. Over the past several years, have you seen increasing demand for lionfish meat? And have fishermen expressed an interest in buying and operating robots? If so, what has this demand been like, and if not, what gives you confidence that these things will happen?

    Our confidence in the lionfish market comes from two places: First, there was a decline in the number of lionfish sightings last year due to a temporary disease (no one is quite sure what caused it, but we have already heard they are back) and during that time the supply dried up, prices rose and we heard from seafood wholesalers that restaurants were even buying fish right off the docks to secure their menus.

    Secondly, everywhere we travel, locals, visitors, government officials, and professionals all hear about the issue and want to help. Requesting and buying the fish at the market is one of the easiest things that anyone can do to make a real difference in the environment, and people seem hungry to rise to this particular challenge. We have also spoken with fishermen, spearmen, and trappers and their questions boil down to economics. Can they make their living catching lionfish with our robots? And we wouldn’t be working so hard on this project, if we weren’t 100 percent confident that it was possible.

    “There are many methods of crowdsourcing the mission that we are considering. One is an autonomous hunting robot that asks for human confirmation on an image of the target lionfish before a capture is made. This would allow a much larger fleet of autonomous robots to be operated with oversight when it matters most” —Adam Cantor, RSE
    More generally, why do you think that fishermen would be willing to purchase a robot, and then spend what looks to be a substantial amount of time catching relatively small numbers of lionfish one by one?

    For a quick example let us assume the best case scenario for a lionfish spearman. A professional spearman can go to the start of lionfish breeding depth at 200 feet, and can stay down there for 10 minutes. They can make three to five dives in a day before they need to start worrying about serious diving risks. We know that the record setting pros can catch a fish in 10 seconds or so, so assume 60 fish in 10 minutes, five times, for a total of 300 fish for one diver in one day. The diver spent at least 6 hours to make those dives not counting travel time, equipment management and more, and again we are assuming world record pace here.

    Our team can successfully catch one lionfish per minute. The robot can hold at least 10 average size fish, and the ROV can travel 100 feet per minute, up to a depth of 400 feet. So now I am going to spend 2 minutes to reach the same depth as my diver, spend 10 minutes to catch 10 fish, and then drive back up for 2 minutes to dump the fish and swap batteries if necessary (which also takes less than a minute). So assume conservatively that I am now catching 10 fish in 15 minutes. The robot needs no rest, each battery lasts over an hour of hunting time so it is easy to contain all of the batteries on board for the entire day. This brings us to 40 fish per hour, or 320 fish in an 8-hour day. Assuming there are fish left down there, the robot has lights and can run indefinitely so long as batteries can be recharged or we have enough of them. Our robot driver has had no risk to themselves, the fish all come up alive and fresh, ready for sale. On top of that there is no reason not to have two drivers and two robots off the same boat to double the catch rate.

    Colin Angle mentioned that “with advances in wireless technology, we can actually have an app where people pay to go hunt lionfish and capture the fish by remotely operating the robot.” Is that (or some other method of dispersing the human labor required to operate the robots) still something you’re considering?

    There are many methods of crowdsourcing the mission that we are considering. One that I find of particular interest is an autonomous hunting robot that asks for human confirmation on an image of the target lionfish before a capture is made. This would allow a much larger fleet of autonomous robots to be operated with oversight when it matters most. Colin’s suggestion is 100 percent viable, as the current control software can already run on any modern computer, tablet, or phone.

    Lionfish spend much of their time in very close proximity to reefs. How will you make sure that the robots don’t cause damage to the reef while pursuing and capturing lionfish, especially with relatively inexperienced consumers controlling them?

    The robot itself has its control scheme set so that when you are hunting a large control input still corresponds to a small motion. This takes out most of the risk of accidentally hitting anything at dangerous speeds. We are also already working through mechanical safety features for just this reason such as permeable foam coating on the paddles that won’t affect the stun and capture, but will stop any impacts from doing real damage. There is also always a human-in-the-loop to make sure controls and impacts are monitored appropriately.

    [​IMG]
    Image: RSE
    Can you describe some of the engineering challenges that are unique to a robot with these capabilities?

    Control latency is a huge challenge, the more complex the command or data signals, the longer it takes to transfer complete data. This can be frustrating for drivers dealing with currents, or wave motion. We have put a lot of thought and effort into what controls can be handled by the ROV on board, what data is useful to the driver, and what things just aren’t important enough to sacrifice update rate. Also safety is a massive challenge, we aren’t just careful of divers who might be in the water, but also every conceivable sea creature that may be curious or hidden out of sight, but within our stunning field. A huge amount of fine tuning was done to make sure that the lionfish could be stunned, but nothing larger, and that the field was non-lethal to even the smallest fish.

    How much does the Mark 3 cost to construct? How much do you think it would cost to construct in volume?

    The Mark 3 including batteries and communication tether costs ~$2500. At volume, we have an actionable and reasonable plan to sell the product version for ~$1000.

    What improvements are you looking to make between the Mark 3 and the Mark 4?

    We want to increase our depth limit to greater than 500 feet to actively engage in the lionfish’s critical action depth. The stun field can be optimized for lower power consumption, or greater effective range, and that is a balance we are working on. The Mark 4 will be the first platform to trial new autonomous behaviors, driver assistance, and more AI based features. There will be maneuverability improvements to assist in ease of use and hunting efficiency. There will be a method for reliably “packing in” the lionfish to increase storage capacity and fill rate. We will also be pursuing meaningful partnerships with manufacturers to reach cost targets, while improving our designs specifically for production and cost. The Mark 4 will also integrate the feedback that we have received from fishermen on user experience, ease of use, accessibility, and operational efficiency.

    It sounds like there’s a lot of dependence here on people (like fishermen) being willing to hunt lionfish more because it’s important for the environment, rather than because it’s strictly the most profitable thing to do. And I’m not convinced that most people who make a living from catching fish are going to be willing to do that, especially since the more lionfish get caught, the less valuable they’re going to be. What seems more realistic to me is the model that Colin Angle touched on, of crowdsourcing the problem and encouraging people to do this for fun, or as a challenge, rather than as a means of making a living.

    There are lots of challenges to this, however. As Adam mentions, communications and latency are big ones, since they make it more difficult to control the robot unless you’re physically attached to it with a tether, and you’re also trying to deal with fish that are moving in an ocean that is also moving. It seems like the RSE team is committed to making this work, though, and as a diver myself, I sincerely hope that they’re able to make an impact.
     
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  35. Tony Wonder

    Tony Wonder Well-Known Member
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    Fuck yes. Kill all those fuckers.
     
  36. dallasdawg

    dallasdawg does the tin man have a sheet metal cock?
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    lionfish are as delicious as they are vicious
     
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  37. THF

    THF Banned From Hogville for Being an Ass
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    In Belize, if you want you can hunt as many of those fuckers as you want.
     
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  38. dallasdawg

    dallasdawg does the tin man have a sheet metal cock?
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    that’s the case everywhere. they’re fucking everything up
     
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  39. Biff Bridges

    Biff Bridges The words, you're good with the words man
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    Missed this thread first time around but scuba diving is incredible and I'd recommend it to anyone that plans on a vacation to Mexico or anywhere diving is popular. First time I went after getting certified in some ice cold, murky gravel pit in Nebraska we dove the Santa Rosa Wall off Cozumel. Slight upgrade.
     
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  40. racer

    racer Forecheck, Backcheck, Paycheck, buddy.
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  41. lechnerd

    lechnerd They say Monaco is a sunny place for shady people
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    I go once a year to Cozumel. What do you want to know?
     
  42. Arrec Bardwin

    Arrec Bardwin He ain’t me, he can’t be me
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    Yep going from a freezing quarry in Birmingham with 8 inch visibility to Grand Cayman was quite the experience.
     
  43. THF

    THF Banned From Hogville for Being an Ass
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    Same, I did mine in Arkansas to swimming off the side of the reef 110 ft down at Cayman was quite a transition.
     
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  44. Gin Buckets

    Gin Buckets Well-Known Member
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  45. Oranjello

    Oranjello Well-Known Member
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    Probably not a terrible approach, and you may actually learn more. When I got certified ~16 years ago, I recall one of the proctors telling me the answers to some of the questions I was struggling with during the exam(s).
     
  46. DuffandMuff

    DuffandMuff Well-Known Member
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    I got certified in Utila off the coast of Honduras in 2017. Wasn’t planning on doing it, so I spent the previous day/night indulging in a variety of substances. Made for a struggle the next morning when I was in the classroom and then had to pass the swimming portion.
     
  47. Det. Frank Bullitt

    Det. Frank Bullitt God Bless Texas
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  48. Fancy

    Fancy anyway...here's Wonderwall
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    Yep that's what I did. Just make sure you have all your paperwork completed and signed by a divemaster so you can show the other divemaster.
     
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  49. Simon Templar

    Simon Templar Well-Known Member
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    My 12yo just did it and did fine. SDI seems ok but he did PADI and it seems accepted more universally.
     
  50. Oranjello

    Oranjello Well-Known Member
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    As a class, PADI seems to be a bit more generally appealing (in other words, targeted for the masses and is less technical). But as a certification, in my experience PADI seems to be more accepted internationally.

    I received my basic open water certification from SSI, and because it's less well known I have had to persuade dive shops to accept it before by showing them more advanced certifications, which is less than ideal due to potential legal liability if anything were to go wrong on the dive. So, if you are going to be diving internationally, going with PADI is something to consider so you can avoid any questions.