TMB's True Crime Thread

Discussion in 'The Mainboard' started by 941Gator, Mar 24, 2019.

  1. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    A court official failed to click a box — and a witness paid with his life

    By Alex Horton (Washington Post)

    February 22


    David Henderson had developed a reputation as a mechanic with a steady wrench and a helpful disposition, just a few clicks away on the Denver pages of Craigslist. Weeks before he was murdered, Tina Black needed Henderson’s help.


    Black hired him and brought Henderson work on a vehicle at a hotel in August 2016. Henderson tried to remain inconspicuous in a hotel room, which swirled with guns and drugs. He discovered gloves and masks inside her car. He took photos and turned them over to police.


    Henderson, 48, was heralded in court documents as a key witness to implicate Terance Black, Tina’s son, in a robbery of a Denver marijuana dispensary. It also led to his death.


    Henderson was killed by gunmen two months later. A court’s filing error revealed his identity to Terance Black, prosecutors said. He and an accomplice fired 10 shots that struck Henderson outside his mother’s apartment. Tina Black drove the getaway car, according to Arapahoe County District Attorney George Brauchler.


    Tina Black, 51, and Terance Black, 26, were sentenced Thursday to life without parole on first-degree murder and murder conspiracy charges. Brauchler called the moment “bittersweet” — justice was served, he said Friday, but a few clicks of a computer mouse by a court official could have prevented tragedy.


    “This is the nightmare scenario, where sensitive information is accidentally sent to absolutely the wrong people,” he told The Washington Post. “You had a good man who was trying to do the right thing.”


    The fatal mistake was simple, Brauchler explained. The statewide software system default was to send criminal complaints and affidavits to all parties, including defendants and witnesses. The box was not unchecked by an official at the Arapahoe County District Court, and documents that described key details about Henderson’s cooperation were obtained by Terance Black.


    That error happened 1,500 times across the state in a one-year period starting last June, when the problem was raised by prosecutors, Colorado Judicial Branch spokesman Rob McCallum said. But that audit figure represented certain open cases, and the system was used for at least seven years, he said. McCallum could not say if that meant the actual number of errors was far greater.


    The system now requires judges to specifically select which parties receive court files, McCallum said. In Henderson’s case, it was a judge who probably made the “clerical error,” he said.


    McCallum declined to say whether the court or state felt responsible for Henderson’s death; to his knowledge, no one has been disciplined or held accountable. Henderson’s sister Karen told reporters after the sentencing her brother was worried about retribution but still worked with police. “He didn’t have the proper protection,” she said, the Associated Press reported. “It’s just a shame his life got taken for trying to do the right thing.”

    Court records provided to The Post reveal Henderson’s unexpected descent into the Blacks’ criminal enterprise. Court records were sealed until Thursday to protect other witnesses, Brauchler said.


    Soon after the robbery, Tina Black took Henderson to the Timbers Hotel in Denver to work on a car. But there was little he could do; he needed a radiator hose from a shop that was closed.


    Henderson was scared, according to an affidavit, and believed he was unknowingly drawn into a crime. He took photos of the masks and gloves and texted them to police investigators.


    One unnamed witness in the hotel room connected to the incident said Terance Black pointed a gun at both of them and said not to speak about the drug operation. If they did, Black told them, “I’ll kill both of y’all,” the person told police.


    Terance Black, after he posted bond, obtained the court records from a suspect who received it directly from the court, Brauchler said. The same witness told police Black fumed after learning of Henderson’s involvement, which was “all over it ... telling,” the witness said, recounting Black’s words.


    Another person played a final role in Henderson’s death, according to court documents.


    An unnamed woman with an unclear relationship with Henderson bought crack cocaine from Terance and Tina Black in a motel the night of Henderson’s murder, according to the affidavit. They asked her where he was and said “snitches get stitches.” The woman said she was on her way to see him.


    A group from the hotel room would follow her in a separate car, they told her.


    She and Henderson drove around smoking crack cocaine with the vehicle on their tail. She dropped him off at his mother’s apartment, where he lived. Gunshots soon rang out. She sped off.


    Henderson’s mother heard the shots, court records show.

    She called 911 — frantic and worried the crumpled body outside her apartment belonged to her son who just wanted to help.


    https://www.washingtonpost.com/nati...ss-paid-with-his-life/?utm_term=.e4e83c3aa558
     
    slogan119 likes this.
  2. DuffandMuff

    DuffandMuff Well-Known Member
    Tampa Bay Lightning

    For some reason I just thought of this old murder when reading this thread. Shitty AMC Show occurred when I was a kid in Jax. I just reread the details for the first time in forever and I feel that the killer should be released from jail at some point.

    Cliffs: 14 year old kid hits a baseball that bloodies the eye of an 8 year old girl he was playing with. Scared of his father since he wasn't supposed to be outside, he brings the girl in his house and tries to kill her. Finally stabs her to death. A huge search party looked for the girl for days, meanwhile she was dead under his mattress.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josh_Phillips_(murderer)#cite_note-24

    Edit: the killin should be turned off in the true crime thread
     
    racer likes this.
  3. buckwild

    buckwild #BucketsGetsBuckets
    Donor
    Ohio State BuckeyesDetroit LionsDetroit PistonsDetroit Red Wings

    Woof. That's a very sad story all around.
     
  4. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    Thanks to a SCOTUS case he had an argument to be re-sentenced but got sentenced to Life again


    Joshua Phillips, known as the boy who killed 8-year-old Maddie Clifton and hid her under his waterbed for a week, showed no reaction Friday as a judge told him he will have to spend the rest of his life behind bars.

    Family members and friends — those both in favor and against the decision in one of Jacksonville’s most recognizable cases — shed tears as they completed this process for a second time nearly 20 years later.

    Phillips, now 33, was 14 when he beat and stabbed his young neighbor friend.


    https://www.jacksonville.com/news/p...ce-warranted-joshua-phillips-maddie-clifton-s
     
    Randy Dangus likes this.
  5. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    Those that listen to Live and Die in LA podcast may have heard them mention the google data tracking site. You can actually download your own phone data: https://takeout.google.com/?pli=1



    Also:

    How to Stop Google’s Sensorvault From Sharing Your Location With Law Enforcement
    Google’s Sensorvault is a location history database that police can query to see phones near the location of a crime. Google is the only company with such a database—and innocent people have been arrested because of it.

    Should You Care?
    Whether you care about this is a personal decision. The New York Timesinvestigation provides some powerful reasons you might want to care. Sure, you’re a law-abiding citizen—but you might end up near a crime. Do you want the cops to be investigating you because you happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time?

    And, realistically, you don’t have to make much of a change to get your location history data out of Google’s Sensorvault. You can keep using Google Maps and other Google services—they’ll just be a bit less personalized after you disable Google’s location history service.

    On the other hand, this location history data does provide some nice personalization features in your Google account—and sure, if you’re a law-abiding citizen, you probably won’t get accidentally swept up in an investigation. Whether you want to enable or disable this feature is up to you.

    How to Remove Your Location Data From Sensorvault
    Only data associated with Google’s location history feature appears in the vault. So, if you don’t use location history, you’re good.

    On an iPhone, your phone won’t be sending this location history data to Google unless you’ve installed Google apps—like Google Maps, for example—and enabled the location history feature. Of course, many people have.

    To check whether location history is enabled, head to the Activity History page on Google’s website and sign in with the same Google account you use on your phone. You can click the arrow next to “Devices on this account” to see which devices you own are reporting location history information to Google.

    If you’re not at a PC, you can also disable location history from your Android phone. On Android you can head to the buried Settings > Google > Google Account > Data & personalization > Activity Controls > Location History > Manage Settings screen.

    https://www.howtogeek.com/411387/ho...m-sharing-your-location-with-law-enforcement/
     
    racer and devine like this.
  6. DuffandMuff

    DuffandMuff Well-Known Member
    Tampa Bay Lightning

    This case was featured on Dateline NBC on Friday.
     
    devine likes this.
  7. Biship

    Biship Well-Known Member
    Donor

    Is that Australian one narrated by Australians? Because I find Australian accents unbearable

     
  8. devine

    devine Make Devine A Mod Again
    Donor
    West Virginia MountaineersPittsburgh PenguinsTiger WoodsNational LeagueBarAndGrillCoors Light

    941Gator read the story of Mel ignatow. Total dumbass
     
    941Gator likes this.
  9. Biship

    Biship Well-Known Member
    Donor

  10. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    would love to get some opinions on this from my fellow true crime guys Detlef Schrempf devine stric006 Schadenfred slogan119 etc

    So for various reasons i've been in the loop on this case for a while. You'll have to watch the video posted below, but cliffs are..... Guy is killed and his girl is there for the murder. Drug dealer (Crossley Green) becomes police suspect in the murder. The prosecutor/police find 2 witnesses (including drug dealer’s sister) to say drug dealer confessed to them. Drug dealer gets convicted. A hair that may be his is found in the victim’s car.

    Years later the whole thing has since unraveled and I'd say majority of the locals now believe he is innocent, including some of the police that helped put him away.

    Video: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/48-hours-crosley-greens-last-chance-for-freedom/

    Article: https://www.floridatoday.com/story/...green-convicted-murderer-new-trial/807644002/
     
    #110 941Gator, May 20, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2019
  11. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    A Coach Admitted To A Sex Crime On Tape. But When The Victim Died, He Walked Free.

    Emilie Morris got her high school cross-country coach to admit to sex crimes on tape. But when she unexpectedly died at age 35, the criminal case she’d fought to bring against him died, too.
    Emilie Morris turned on the digital recorder wedged into her sports bra. She pulled her SUV into the Saint Louis Galleria mall parking lot, where a high school running coach named Jim Wilder waited. The device picked up some rustling, a Rihanna ballad on the car stereo, a deep breath, and Emilie’s voice: “Let’s hope this goes well.”

    https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/jtes/the-case-died-with-her#.as9AQgy47L
     
    devine likes this.
  12. Walt Disney

    Walt Disney #Dawgzy #Runlyfe #MCFC
    Donor TMB OG
    Georgia BulldogsManchester City

    Listened to my first crime junkie podcast today
    The eastburn case

    Would recommend
    Crazy story
     
    devine likes this.
  13. Walt Disney

    Walt Disney #Dawgzy #Runlyfe #MCFC
    Donor TMB OG
    Georgia BulldogsManchester City

    The crime junkie’s sidekick is annoying

    Just repeats what the host says in a question
     
  14. devine

    devine Make Devine A Mod Again
    Donor
    West Virginia MountaineersPittsburgh PenguinsTiger WoodsNational LeagueBarAndGrillCoors Light

    Gonna start this today
     
  15. devine

    devine Make Devine A Mod Again
    Donor
    West Virginia MountaineersPittsburgh PenguinsTiger WoodsNational LeagueBarAndGrillCoors Light

    Just listened to my first episode and wow you are right. She’s so over the top. “Wow!” “Uhhh!! Then what happened??!!” Adds nothing
     
  16. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

  17. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    More podcasts:


    Uncover: The Village

    Host: Justin Ling, Canadian Broadcast Corporation journalist.

    Story: Nine engrossing, Serial-esque episodes examining the horrible rash of violence Toronto’s LGBTQ community faced over the past 12 years at the hands of serial killer, Bruce MacArthur—and police’s lackluster response to the murders. Ling not only frequently passes the mic to victims’ friends and families, prioritizing healing story-telling as much as grisly detail-sharing, but also peers into the past to ask a chilling question: Could MacArthur be involved in other cold cases dating back to the 1970s?


    White Lies

    Host: Andrew Beck Grace and Chip Brantley, University of Alabama professors.

    Story: An NPR-produced show examining the still-unsolved murder of Reverend James Reeb, a white Unitarian minister killed in 1965 after sojourning to Selma, Alabama, to contribute to the civil rights fight. Reeb’s death received national attention (and was cited by President Lyndon B. Johnson when he signed the Voting Rights Act) but its personal and historic repercussions have largely faded from memory—until now.


    Charged

    Host: Emily Bazelon, staff writer for the New York Times Magazine.

    Story: An in-depth, six-episode investigation tackling criminal justice, mass incarceration, the seemingly untouchable second amendment, and misguided gun reform efforts filtered through the harrowing experiences of the overwhelmingly young, black, and male defendants caught up (even ensnared) in New York City’s so-called “gun court,” designed to speedily prosecute those found illegally possessing firearms.


    Bomber

    Host: Jason Puckett, journalist.

    Story: Six episodes exploring the 19-day bombing rampage, orchestrated by Mark Anthony Conditt, that shocked and panicked the city of Austin last year. Listen in for intimate interviews with neighbors and survivors and teased-apart answers to lingering questions—like how Conditt, whose homemade explosives killed two Texans and injured five others, selected who or where to target; how law enforcement’s frantic manhunt unfolded; and what drove the serial bomber to embark on a terror-laden spree.


    The Murder Squad

    Host: Paul Holes and Billy Jensen, retired cold case detective and true crime journalist, respectively.

    Story: An interactive series of cold case reopenings led by Holes and Jensen, who possess major investigating chops. (Holes’ expertise helped catch the Golden State Killer; Jensen helped finish Michelle McNamara’s chilling book on the GSK, I’ll Be Gone in the Dark, after her sudden death in 2016.) Come for the behavioral deep-dives and modern-day detective strategies; stay for the invitation to be an amateur sleuth (seriously), per each episode’s stated assignment and code of conduct.


    Unsolved: The Devil You Know

    Host: Gina Barton, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter.

    Story: A 10-part spinetingler about the mysterious slaying of Father Alfred Kunz, who was found murdered at the Catholic church and school where he worked in Dane, Wisconsin, in 1998. From Kunz’s strict traditionalism to alleged affairs with congregants to a close friendship with a waitress who had, uh, visions, Barton pulls at various threads of this twisty, Serial-like story to try and solve a still-unanswered question: Why was Kunz killed?


    What Happened to Holly Bartlett

    Host: Maggie Rahr, investigative journalist.

    Story: A stirring six-parter that digs deep into the suspicious death of 31-year-old Holly Bartlett, a blind woman found unconscious under a bridge in Halifax in 2010. For the past nine years, police have sworn there was never enough to suggest foul play (the case was actually ruled an accident within the first 72 hours)—but family, friends, and hired private detectives insist something fishy must have gone down and are still on the hunt for new evidence.


    Criminal

    Host: Phoebe Judge, North Carolina public radio producer.

    Story: An oldie but a goodie with bi-monthly episodes featuring interviews with those who have committed a crime, been the victim of a crime, or got stuck somewhere in between. Judge’s buttery-smooth radio voice never fails to captivate whether she’s discussing house hauntings, illegal lotteries, the witness protection program, sex work, bank heists, séances, even a famous dog kidnapping.
     
    slogan119 likes this.
  18. slogan119

    slogan119 Her?
    Donor TMB OG
    Florida State SeminolesChicago CubsReal Madrid

    Murder Squad will be fun to listen to on an upcoming trip.

    Wish I could also get The Devil You Know, but it’s not on Overcast
     
  19. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    Just got to reading this. Wow. I've heard of stories similar. DJ attaches to crimes with similar elements and obviously perjury doesn't equate/cancel the murder charge. I found a doc on it.


    The case was controversial because Ignatow was acquitted of the charge, but photographs proving his guilt were uncovered after the trial. Six months after Ignatow's acquittal, a carpetlayer working in Ignatow's old house, which had been sold to fund his defense, pulled up a length of carpet in a hallway. Under it he found a floor vent containing a plastic bag, taped to hold it inside the vent. Inside the bag was the jewelry Schaefer had taken with her on the night of her disappearance, and three rolls of undeveloped film. When developed, the film showed Ignatow torturing and raping Schaefer, just as Shore had described. Ignatow's face was not in the pictures, but body hair patterns and moles matched him perfectly.

    Ignatow was brought to trial for perjury based on his grand jury testimony. Knowing that he could not be retried for the murder because of double jeopardy, Ignatow confessed in court at his perjury trial. He turned to Schaefer's brothers in court and said that he had killed her, but claimed that she had died peacefully.

    Ignatow served five years of an eight-year sentence for perjury. The state later prosecuted him on perjury charges for testimony he gave in a case against Schaefer's employer for threatening to kill Ignatow if he didn't reveal where Schaefer was. He was sentenced to nine years for that perjury charge. Ignatow was released from prison for the second time in December 2006. He returned to Louisville, living in a home four miles from the house where he murdered Schaefer.

    Author Bob Hill wrote a book on the case called Double Jeopardy, which became a bestseller and provoked widespread interest in the case.[8] MSNBC and CourtTV also produced television documentaries on the case.

    Brenda Sue Schaefer is buried in her family's plot in Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville.

     
  20. Henry Blake

    Henry Blake No Springsteen is leaving this house!

    Emma posted this in the Random Thoughts thread. SIAP.
    https://www.apnews.com/5708803d4d544a15838b1cc3401a0868
    David Schuldes and Ellen Matheys, engaged to be married, set up their campsite at a secluded spot in McClintock Park on Friday afternoon, July 9, 1976.


    It appeared they were alone.

    Schuldes was a 25-year-old part-timer in the circulation department of the Green Bay Press-Gazette; Matheys, 24, worked at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay library.

    They were about to go for a walk, according to court documents and news reports of the time. First, Matheys stopped to use the restroom.

    Two shots from a .30-caliber rifle shattered the quiet. One bullet struck Schuldes’ neck from 50 feet away, killing him instantly. The other bullet lodged in a bathroom wall.
    Matheys ran, with the killer in pursuit, investigators say. He caught and raped her, then shot her twice in the chest.

    Her body was found 200 yards from where Schuldes lay, a camera slung over his shoulder.

    Investigators were stumped: The killer took no money and left Matheys’ purse in the couple’s car. They didn’t know why the couple was targeted, and leads were scant. For months, campers avoided McClintock Park.

    DNA profiling in the ’90s brought new hope, but detectives got no matches when they submitted the semen from Matheys’ shorts to the FBI’s national database.


    Last year, detectives contacted Virginia-based Parabon NanoLabs, a DNA technology company whose work with genetic genealogy analysis has helped police identify 55 suspects in cold cases nationwide since May 2018, according to the company. Parabon uploads DNA from crime scenes to GEDmatch, a free, public genealogy database with about 1.2 million profiles, all voluntarily submitted by people who’ve used consumer genealogy sites like Ancestry.com and 23andMe.

    California law enforcement used GEDmatch to capture the Golden State Killer last year by finding distant relatives and reverse-engineering his family tree.

    Parabon’s experts completed Vannieuwenhoven’s family tree in late December. They’d found his parents, who had lived in the Green Bay area. Now detectives needed DNA samples from Vannieuwenhoven and his three brothers. Two were ruled out with DNA samples collected from one brother’s trash and another’s used coffee cup.

    On March 6, two sheriff’s deputies knocked on Vannieuwenhoven’s door, pretending they wanted him to fill out a brief survey on area-policing. They told him to put the survey in an envelope and seal it with his tongue.

    Detectives didn’t need to visit the fourth brother. Eight days later, Vannieuwenhoven was in custody.


    ___

    At Vannieuwenhoven’s first court appearance, on March 22, bond was set at $1 million.

    “Not guilty, not guilty, not guilty,” Vannieuwenhoven said, when the judge asked him if he understood the charges. His next court date is June 19.

    Kurt Schuldes, 68, a cousin of David Schuldes in Green Bay, welcomed the news of an arrest, but lamented the time it took: “He just got away with it for way too long, unfortunately.”

    “It was a long time coming,” said Cynthia Chizek, Matheys’ 53-year-old niece, who lives in Henderson, Nevada. “It’s just something that always hangs over your head, knowing that there’s someone out there who did this heinous crime.”

    Prosecutors and Lakewood residents, meanwhile, were left with the question: Who is Raymand Lawrence Vannieuwenhoven?

    Richard Leurquin, twin brother of Vannieuwenhoven’s dead wife, Rita, said his brother-in-law was “a very loving father to his wife and kids.” He’s convinced Vannieuwenhoven is innocent.

    The Vannieuwenhovens were married until her death in 2008, a few months after they celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary. Sankey said after Rita died, Vannieuwenhoven spent his days fishing, hunting, and going on weeks-long camping trips.

    But Vannieuwenhoven had a dark side. To start, this isn’t his first time in jail.

    In 1957, when he was 20, married, and going by the name Lawrence Vannieuwenhoven, he was jailed for six months for an unprovoked attack on a 17-year-old girl. She was walking with three friends when Vannieuwenhoven struck her on the back, face, and shoulder. Shortly before, police said, Vannieuwenhoven also tried to attack a 16-year-old girl.

    Vannieuwenhoven said before sentencing he “was only trying to scare the girls,” the Press-Gazette reported at the time.

    In 1960, he pleaded guilty to not providing financial support to his wife and their 1-year-old daughter, the Press-Gazette reported then. He was on probation for a year.

    More recently, some neighbors caught glimpses of a menacing side when he drank. He stopped only a few years ago, for his health, they said.

    “I know this much — when he was drinking he was one son of a bitch. You didn’t want to be anywhere near him when he was drinking. Not just me, a lot of people,” said Fred Mason, 66, who works at the town dump where Vannieuwenhoven was seen frequently, rummaging through scrap piles for small engine parts.

    Robert Ganzell, 86, and his wife sometimes dined out with Vannieuwenhoven. He heard from others that he had a temper when he drank, but Ganzell said he never witnessed it.

    As for the murder charges, Ganzell was nonplussed. “Never thought of it being him, doing anything like that,” Ganzell said. Aside from that, he had little to say about Vannieuwenhoven.

    In fact, the neighbors realized that they knew little about this man. For instance, it’s unclear where he worked before retiring. Sankey said he’s heard Vannieuwenhoven was an iron worker, but he also told Sankey he used to haul and deliver boats.

    Sankey, 68, said he and his wife are still coming to terms with the allegations against their next-door neighbor, the guy who would occasionally repair his lawnmower or snow blower.

    “People had the impression that he was a very good, normal person, just a retired guy,” Sankey said. “No matter where you went you’d mention Ray and they’d say, ‘Oh yeah, old Ray.’ That was basically about it. It’s still hard to believe.”
     
  21. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    damn emma posting gruesome shit in the RTT. crazy story though. Wisconsin I feel like does a decent job at staying out of the true crime news (besides Avery).

    speaking of Wisconsin.....Still waiting on Judge for the next ruling

     
  22. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    [​IMG]

    https://kutv.com/news/local/two-utah-natives-murdered-in-virginia-killer-spared-baby-toddler

    Two Utah natives among 3 found murdered in Virginia; killer spared baby, toddler

    PROVO, Utah (KUTV) — Families on opposite sides of the country are trying to figure out how to raise two young children after their parents and older brother were murdered.

    The mom and brother — Rachel and Kyrrus Ozuna — grew up in Mapleton, Utah. They lived in Spanish Fork with Rachel’s partner — Michael Coleman — before moving closer to his family in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, a couple of years ago.

    Deputies there found the three bodies Wednesday morning at their rural Virginia home. They’re investigating the case as a homicide and believe the killer used a “sharp instrument.”

    A nearly 2-month-old baby and a nearly 2-year-old toddler were spared. The families have not yet figured out who will raise the kids.

    “The kids are safe,” said Kaisha Ozuna, Rachel’s sister, who lives in Provo. “They’re being held at a hospital and, right now, we’re just trying to get out there so we can hold onto them and hold onto a piece of our family.”

    The family had raised more than $9,000 by Thursday evening to help raise the children and to have the bodies of Rachel and Kyrrus returned to Utah.

    Kaisha said she tried talking to her sister on Sunday but didn’t hear back from her.

    “My sister — such an amazing person,” she said. “She was my go-to for everything. If I was having a bad day, she was the one I would call. We talked a lot.”
    The bodies were found days later, and the two young children were dehydrated.
     
  23. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    The true-crime series ‘Killer Ratings,’ currently streaming on Netflix, probes the life of Wallace Souza, a No. 1-rated TV host in Brazil accused of offing people to up ratings.

     
  24. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    Netflix made a show about Central Park 5



    Prosecutor now getting a bunch of shit due to this show






    *Damn, this shit is hard to watch. More powerful than the documentary due to the actors.
     
    #124 941Gator, Jun 5, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2019
  25. Henry Blake

    Henry Blake No Springsteen is leaving this house!

    SIAP. HLN is doing a series on the two girls that disappeared during/after a mobile home fire in Welch, OK in 1999.

    https://cnncreativemarketing.com/project/hell-in-the-heartland/
     
  26. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    Just finished. Very well done. Highly recommend if you have Netflix. devine slogan119 Detlef Schrempf

    also fwiw, fuck her imo:

    Where is the Central Park Jogger now?

    For years, Trisha Meiliwas only known as the “Central Park Jogger,” as her identity was shielded from the public. To this day, she doesn’t remember anything about the night of the assault, and it was considered a miracle that she recovered. (It's been reportedthat Meili lost 75 percent of her blood and was in a coma for 12 days following the attack.) The attack left herwith scars and no sense of smell.


    In 2014, Meili published a book titled I Am the Central Park Jogger: A Story of Hope and Possibility, revealing her identity for the first time. In the book, she wrote, “One of the saddest aspects of the trials was that it was so quickly turned into a racial conflict.” As of July 2018, Meili, who’s now in her late fifties, was described as a runner (who once ran the New York City Marathon) and a yoga enthusiast, living in Florida with her husband. Meili is also a public speaker, sharing her story with other sexual assault survivors and survivors of traumatic brain injuries.


    In 2018, Meili told the New York Daily News, “Living with this uncertainty over the past almost 30 years has brought tremendous turmoil, sometimes sleepless nights and feelings of helplessness.” But she also believes that the five men who were originally imprisoned for the crime were not mistreated by the New York police or the Manhattan District Attorney’s office. She said, “When that lawsuit was settled, it gave some the impression that the detectives and the prosecutors had acted improperly and I’d like to see it be acknowledged that there wasn’t a violation of [the teens’] civil rights.”

    Referring to the city’s $41 million settlement with the five men, she told the outlet, “I was shocked and somewhat disgusted and really so disappointed that the case against the city claiming the detectives and prosecutor had acted improperly ... that it was settled for what seems to me like a campaign promise from then-candidate Bill de Blasio.” And in a statement to NBC, Meili said that while When They See Us is said to be "based on a true story," she is "troubled that the series is not a factual account."
     
    #126 941Gator, Jun 6, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2019
    slogan119 and devine like this.
  27. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

  28. Henry Blake

    Henry Blake No Springsteen is leaving this house!

    Released the entire crime scene on Day 1 after ~9 hours. The poor Bible family having to dig through the rubble trying to find their daughter.

    9PM Eastern tonight on HLN.
     
  29. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    And thought of the girls as suspects. Crazy cliff hanger at end of episode 1 though.
     
  30. devine

    devine Make Devine A Mod Again
    Donor
    West Virginia MountaineersPittsburgh PenguinsTiger WoodsNational LeagueBarAndGrillCoors Light

    We should have done a tmb meet up at crimecon

    I just learned via Reddit that the true crime garage guys are brothers. Blew my mind
     
  31. Henry Blake

    Henry Blake No Springsteen is leaving this house!

    Don't remember much being said about the Freeman boy in E1. The plot thickens.
     
  32. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    Episode 1 pushed us in the direction of the police, but episode 2 opened up the door for Phil Welch or whatever his name was. I think it is obvious that this was a drug related incident. Grandpa knows his son was using too. Damn shame the girl’s were home.
     
  33. Henry Blake

    Henry Blake No Springsteen is leaving this house!

    Sounds like a lot of shady activity going on in that area, especially meth.
     
  34. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    I enjoyed the "William Bradford" episode. They have a few episodes up. https://www.exactlyrightmedia.com/the-murder-squad

    Murder squad is with Paul Holes, dude that gets (the most) credit for catching golden state killer.

    [​IMG]
     
    slogan119 likes this.
  35. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

  36. Henry Blake

    Henry Blake No Springsteen is leaving this house!

    I thought Paul Holes was very good on HLN's series on the Golden State Killer.
     
  37. Henry Blake

    Henry Blake No Springsteen is leaving this house!

  38. devine

    devine Make Devine A Mod Again
    Donor
    West Virginia MountaineersPittsburgh PenguinsTiger WoodsNational LeagueBarAndGrillCoors Light

    would anyone be interested in a podcast club? Similar to a book of the month club?
     
  39. Randy Dangus

    Randy Dangus Comanche Indian
    Nebraska Cornhuskers

    I’m in bb
     
    devine likes this.
  40. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    With the goal being for us to listen to a podcast at/around the same time in effort to discuss? I wouldn't mind it and would be willing to make an effort.

    Honestly crazy how much content there is on all this stuff. Endless amounts with books, radio, pods, movies, etc. We could have sub-boards dedicated to different topics or cases and it would be reasonable (no need for that of course). But also fwiw it is hard for me to focus in one specific story/issue. Because I work in crim defense my job sort of pushes all this content on me so I tend to be spread out (clearly based on my postings). For example, I will get a text like "you need to listen to Cold episode 3 about the DNA analysis. Great explanation." so now I make that a priority. I'm also on a few other boards, which are very active concerning this stuff. Some boards are dedicated to big stories or some just for Florida law, but I'm always willing to bring content over to tmb.
     
  41. devine

    devine Make Devine A Mod Again
    Donor
    West Virginia MountaineersPittsburgh PenguinsTiger WoodsNational LeagueBarAndGrillCoors Light

    Yeah not sure if we would want to go the route of “let’s listen to to live and die in la” and discuss that over time or “let’s listen to this weeks true crime garage” where each week is a different story
     
  42. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    Whatever requires the least amount of organization lol. But honestly either method would work. Having to wait on new episodes each week would prevent people from getting ahead. Here is a 6 episode pod that looks good...



    What Happened to Holly Bartlett

    Host: Maggie Rahr, investigative journalist.

    Story: A stirring six-parter that digs deep into the suspicious death of 31-year-old Holly Bartlett, a blind woman found unconscious under a bridge in Halifax in 2010. For the past nine years, police have sworn there was never enough to suggest foul play (the case was actually ruled an accident within the first 72 hours)—but family, friends, and hired private detectives insist something fishy must have gone down and are still on the hunt for new evidence.
     
    devine likes this.
  43. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    I agree. He is a cocky bastard, but he does a great job of telling a story. HLN and Oxygen had a bunch of good content on that case as well.

    Speaking of Oxygen....watched a good piece on Susan Powell for anyone that has listened to Cold Podcast. https://thecoldpodcast.com/

     
  44. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    Biship likes this.
  45. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

  46. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    absolutely. you see the new episode? damn shame the girl's were home.


    as mentioned before, having it all acted out made it come to life, unlike the documentary. insane story and fuck that Prosecutor(s) for not owning it now.
     
    Henry Blake likes this.
  47. slogan119

    slogan119 Her?
    Donor TMB OG
    Florida State SeminolesChicago CubsReal Madrid

    The Robin Hood Hills child murders is my true crine obsession. If I had “fuck you” money I would retire and try to investigate it.

    Once solved, I would move on to Johnny Gosch.
     
  48. Henry Blake

    Henry Blake No Springsteen is leaving this house!

    I saw the better part of E3 last night, but I didn't watch it carefully. I think E4 will have an arrest (June 23).

    HLN is replaying it right now if anyone else missed it. I'm rewatching.
     
  49. Henry Blake

    Henry Blake No Springsteen is leaving this house!

    "CNN affiliate WTIC reported in 2016 that police were using DNA technology to solve the murder. Police told the station that numerous tips about suspects had been called in over the years but none had panned out.

    On September 23, 1986, Flynn said goodbye to her friends and started off on the path she normally took to get home from school, according to WTIC. When she didn't return home on time, her mother started to worry and eventually reported her missing.

    Flynn's body was found in a secluded area about 12 hours later, about 100 feet off the path she took home from school, the station reported."

    https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/13/us/marc-karun-arrested-ct-cold-case-1986-trnd/index.html
     
    devine likes this.
  50. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
    Staff Donor
    Florida Gators

    I'm caught up. Talk about a lot of different (fruitless) leads. The prisoner that lied and confessed is one crazy bastard..

    Jeremy Jones:

    [​IMG]



    The life of a killer

    December 04, 2005

    Detectives have spent hundreds of hours listening to his rambling confessions. The more they hear, the harder it is to tell fact from fiction.

    The brown fields of Arkansas and Mississippi blurred past as a Greyhound sped Jeremy Bryan Jones away from his troubled past.

    It was December 2000, and the handsome 27-year-old mama's boy was wanted in Oklahoma on a rape charge. But he says he was fleeing more than just the law: "I was trying to change. I wanted a new life."

    He always felt the law had it in for him— even though two 1996 rape charges, including one where he allegedly fired a gun to threaten a woman, were reduced and he was given probation.

    Jones had to attend sex-offender classes, which he hated. "I don't want to listen to those perverts talk," he told his mother.

    A gregarious sweet-talker, Jones bragged he could "talk the panties off a nun." The silver-tongued ladies' man considered himself born lucky. But a voracious methamphetamine habit and increasingly aberrant behavior tested that luck — and he knew it.

    "It's easier to look in the rearview mirror than to face your problems," he later told detectives.

    In that mirror was Miami, Okla., population 14,000, a bleak landscape pocked with abandoned zinc and lead mines. Jones says he embraced the "thug mentality" in high school: "They had all the money, the motorcycles, the women. For a while, I had all that, too."

    As he fled Oklahoma, he had $3,000 from selling his truck and something priceless for a man in his situation: a new identity. He'd met the mother of a Missouri inmate in a bar in Joplin, Mo. He told her the system was sticking it to him again. She lent him her son's identity.

    Now he was John Paul Chapman, and during the 20-hour bus ride to Tuscaloosa, Ala., he studied his new birth date and Social Security number. He wanted to spout them without hesitation. It was a role he perfected over the next four years.

    On that bus, though, Jones was far more than a criminal on the run. Police say he was a serial killer on the path to new prey.

    Since his arrest last year, he has confessed to killing at least 21 people in a string of murders that spanned 12 years and five states. Eight may have been metro Atlanta women.

    Becoming John Chapman without slipping up "was easy," he said in telephone interviews last week from the Mobile County, Ala., jail. He mocked the authorities who arrested him three times in Georgia, failed to match his fingerprints with his true identity, and set him free.

    "If I never came back to Mobile," he said, "I'd still be out there. I'd still be John Chapman."

    One conviction thus far

    Last week, Jones was sentenced to death for raping and killing a woman near Mobile.

    Georgia authorities hope to bring him to justice here. He has been charged with the 2004 slaying of Amanda Greenwell, 16, in Douglas County. He told detectives he also killed Tina Mayberry outside a Douglasville bar in 2002 and that he kidnapped, raped and killed Patrice Endres, 38, a hairdresser who disappeared last year from her Forsyth County salon.

    He claimed he killed three prostitutes in Mobile, five in the Atlanta area and another in New Orleans. He has been charged in the New Orleans killing, but police haven't substantiated his other claims.

    Mobile County sheriff's Detective Paul Burch and Sgt. Mitch McRae have spent hundreds of hours with Jones, listening to his rambling and often changing confessions. His stories are a mixture of truth and fantasy.

    "We spent hours and hours talking about hunting and fishing and girls," said McRae, who has a collage of Jones' photos hanging behind his desk. "He brags about conquests, about having affairs with teachers. A lot of that stuff was not true."

    But several polygraph tests have supported his accounts of the killings.

    Nevertheless, Jones now claims his confessions are hogwash, that he played the system to get special meals and phone privileges and meetings with his mother and girlfriend. His mother says he has called more than 350 times.

    "When you take everything a man wants, I'll do everything possible to get what I want," he explained.

    The tale he told detectives goes back to 1992, when he said he stalked, tried to rape and then stabbed to death Jennifer Bryan Judd, a pretty 20-year-old newlywed, in her Baxter Springs, Kan., apartment.

    He also claimed to be the answer to an unsolved Oklahoma case in which a couple was found shot to death in 1999 in their burning trailer. Their 16-year-old daughter and her best friend are still missing.

    Jones told detectives he killed the couple, kidnapped the girls, raped one, shot them both and dumped their bodies down abandoned mine shafts. Burch believes the rape charges had taught him a lesson: "He learned you don't leave a witness."