Space Never Fails to Blow My Mind, 2nd Edition

Discussion in 'The Mainboard' started by Bruce Wayne, Apr 13, 2015.

  1. Emma

    Emma Wisconsin Sports
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  2. Emma

    Emma Wisconsin Sports
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    Odd looking exhaust plumes before MECA

    At near max-Q, it could have been anything that caused it to disintegrate.
     
  3. Moxin24

    Moxin24 Show me that smile
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  4. Mr Bulldops

    Mr Bulldops Jet fuel cant melt dank memes
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    Too cloudy to see the launch from the house but the explosion woke up my roommate and rattled all our windows
     
  5. CUZ28

    CUZ28 Well-Known Member

    Why the fuck is PayPal in charge of getting supplies to the space station?
     
  6. Corky Bucek

    Corky Bucek Hey there all you cool cats and kittens
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    :|
     
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  7. Bruce Wayne

    Bruce Wayne Billionaire Playboy
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    @elonmusk: Cause still unknown after several thousand engineering-hours of review. Now parsing data with a hex editor to recover final milliseconds.
     
  8. je ne suis pas ici

    je ne suis pas ici Well-Known Member
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    [​IMG]

    pluto and charon, rapidly coming into focus. only a few more weeks now before NEW HORIZONS does a fly by
     
  9. WhiskeyDelta

    WhiskeyDelta Formerly MK3rds
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    What kind of camera are they using? Long exposure? Radar?
     
  10. JohnLocke

    JohnLocke Terminally Chill
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    Venus and Jupiter looking extra bright tonight. Really enjoyed watching them get closer all month
     
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  11. je ne suis pas ici

    je ne suis pas ici Well-Known Member
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    headed up to the mtns this wknd. cant wait. my telescope is waitin on me up there
     
  12. JohnLocke

    JohnLocke Terminally Chill
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    The jealousy I have right now is immense
     
  13. Bruce Wayne

    Bruce Wayne Billionaire Playboy
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    @elonmusk: Expect to reach preliminary conclusions regarding last flight by end of week. Will brief key customers & FAA, then post on our website.
     
  14. southlick

    southlick "Better Than You"
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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    These are the most recent high-resolution views of Pluto sent by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, including one showing the four mysterious dark spots on Pluto that have captured the imagination of the world. The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) obtained these three images between July 1 and 3 of 2015, prior to the July 4 anomaly that sent New Horizons into safe mode.

    The left image shows, on the right side of the disk, a large bright area on the hemisphere of Pluto that will be seen in close-up by New Horizons on July 14. The three images together show the full extent of a continuous swath of dark terrain that wraps around much of Pluto’s equatorial region. The western end of the swath (right image) breaks up into a series of striking dark regularly-spaced spots, each hundreds of miles in size, which were first detected in New Horizons images taken in late June. Intriguing details are beginning to emerge in the bright material north of the dark region, in particular a series of bright and dark patches that are conspicuous just below the center of the disk in the right image. In all three black-and-white views, the apparent jagged bottom edge of Pluto is the result of image processing. The inset shows Pluto’s orientation, illustrating its north pole, equator, and central meridian running from pole to pole.

    The color version of the July 3 LORRI image was created by adding color data from the Ralph instrument gathered earlier in the mission.

    Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI
     
  15. Heavy Mental

    Heavy Mental Heir of Aenarion
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    Any word on whether or not they have made progress on fixing the instruments? Seemed pretty serious when it went into safe mode.
     
  16. Emma

    Emma Wisconsin Sports
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    Everything is go come tomorrow.

    It was a timing glitch that caused the mess.

    What a timing glitch means exactly? Won't know. The details will most likely not be made public due to the ITAR restrictions.
     
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  17. Can I Spliff it

    Can I Spliff it Is Butterbean okay?
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    Neat property of numbers that shows up in understanding string theory

    second proof behind spoiler
     
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  18. southlick

    southlick "Better Than You"
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    [​IMG]

    This image of Pluto from New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) was received on July 8, and has been combined with lower-resolution color information from the Ralph instrument.
    Credits: NASA-JHUAPL-SWRI

    After a more than nine-year, three-billion-mile journey to Pluto, it’s show time for NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, as the flyby sequence of science observations is officially underway.



    In the early morning hours of July 8, mission scientists received this new view of Pluto—the most detailed yet returned by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) aboard New Horizons. The image was taken on July 7, when the spacecraft was just under 5 million miles (8 million kilometers) from Pluto, and is the first to be received since the July 4 anomaly that sent the spacecraft into safe mode.



    This view is centered roughly on the area that will be seen close-up during New Horizons’ July 14 closest approach. This side of Pluto is dominated by three broad regions of varying brightness. Most prominent are an elongated dark feature at the equator, informally known as “the whale,” and a large heart-shaped bright area measuring some 1,200 miles (2,000 kilometers) across on the right. Above those features is a polar region that is intermediate in brightness.



    “The next time we see this part of Pluto at closest approach, a portion of this region will be imaged at about 500 times better resolution than we see today,” said Jeff Moore, Geology, Geophysics and Imaging Team Leader of NASA’s Ames Research Center. “It will be incredible!”

    Last Updated: July 8, 2015
    Editor: Tricia Talbert
     
  19. fattus

    fattus Well-Known Member
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    Best 7:49 I spent all day. Thank you, sir.
     
  20. southlick

    southlick "Better Than You"
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    New Image of Pluto: 'Houston, We Have Geology'
    [​IMG]
    Tantalizing signs of geology on Pluto are revealed in this image from New Horizons taken on July 9, 2015 from 3.3 million miles (5.4 million kilometers) away.



    [​IMG]
    An annotated version indicates features described in the text, and includes a reference globe showing Pluto’s orientation in the image, with the equator and central meridian in bold.


    It began as a point of light. Then, it evolved into a fuzzy orb. Now – in its latest portrait from NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft – Pluto is being revealed as an intriguing new world with distinct surface features, including an immense dark band known as the “whale.”

    As the newest black and white image from New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) appeared on the morning of July 10, members of the science team reacted with joy and delight, seeing Pluto as never before. There will no doubt be many similar moments to come. New images and data are being gathered each day as New Horizons speeds closer to a July 14 flyby of Pluto, following a journey of three billion miles.

    “We’re close enough now that we’re just starting to see Pluto’s geology,” said New Horizons program scientist Curt Niebur, NASA Headquarters in Washington, who’s keenly interested in the gray area just above the whale’s “tail” feature. “It’s a unique transition region with a lot of dynamic processes interacting, which makes it of particular scientific interest.”

    New Horizons’ latest image of Pluto was taken on July 9, 2015 from 3.3 million miles (5.4 million kilometers) away, with a resolution of 17 miles (27 kilometers) per pixel. At this range, Pluto is beginning to reveal the first signs of discrete geologic features. This image views the side of Pluto that always faces its largest moon, Charon, and includes the so-called “tail” of the dark whale-shaped feature along its equator. (The immense, bright feature shaped like a heart had rotated from view when this image was captured.)

    “Among the structures tentatively identified in this new image are what appear to be polygonal features; a complex band of terrain stretching east-northeast across the planet, approximately 1,000 miles long; and a complex region where bright terrains meet the dark terrains of the whale,” said New Horizons principal investigator Alan Stern. “After nine and a half years in flight, Pluto is well worth the wait.”

    Follow the New Horizons mission with #PlutoFlyby and on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/new.horizons1
     
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  21. Merica

    Merica Devine pls stop pointing out my demise. :(
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    Pretty sure next week is space week on the science channel. A lot of stuff about Pluto as well as new episodes of the universe.

    That's a good place to start. That's how I started getting into it. :prawl:
     
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  22. Tiffin

    Tiffin “Only time can give you mayonnaise.”
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    So we're going to get real close to Pluto. Like, REAL close. Like as close as the diameter of the earth. I didn't realize that.
     
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  23. Magneto

    Magneto Thats right, formerly Don Brodka.
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    So what are people's thoughts on the existence of Planet X (aka Niburu)?
     
  24. lazy bum

    lazy bum active consumer
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    it doesn't exist.
     
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  25. southlick

    southlick "Better Than You"
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    July 11, 2015

    New Horizons’ Last Portrait of Pluto’s Puzzling Spots
    [​IMG]
    Three billion miles from Earth and just two and a half million miles from Pluto, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has taken its best image of four dark spots that continue to captivate.

    The spots appear on the side of Pluto that always faces its largest moon, Charon—the face that will be invisible to New Horizons when the spacecraft makes its close flyby the morning of July 14. New Horizons principal investigator Alan Stern of the Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado, describes this image as “the last, best look that anyone will have of Pluto’s far side for decades to come.”

    The spots are connected to a dark belt that circles Pluto’s equatorial region. What continues to pique the interest of scientists is their similar size and even spacing. “It’s weird that they’re spaced so regularly,” says New Horizons program scientist Curt Niebur at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Jeff Moore of NASA’s Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California, is equally intrigued. “We can’t tell whether they’re plateaus or plains, or whether they’re brightness variations on a completely smooth surface.”

    The large dark areas are now estimated to be 300 miles (480 kilometers) across, an area roughly the size of the state of Missouri. In comparison with earlier images, we now see that the dark areas are more complex than they initially appeared, while the boundaries between the dark and bright terrains are irregular and sharply defined.

    In addition to solving the mystery of the spots, the New Horizons Geology, Geophysics and Imaging team is interested in identifying other surface features such as impact craters, formed when smaller objects struck the dwarf planet. Moore notes, “When we combine images like this of the far side with composition and color data the spacecraft has already acquired but not yet sent to Earth, we expect to be able to read the history of this face of Pluto.”

    When New Horizons makes its closest approach to Pluto in just three days, it will focus on the opposing or “encounter hemisphere” of the dwarf planet. On the morning of July 14, New Horizons will pass about 7,800 miles (12,500 kilometers) from the face with a large heart-shaped feature that’s captured the imagination of people around the world.

    Image caption: New Horizons' last look at Pluto's Charon-facing hemisphere reveals intriguing geologic details that are of keen interest to mission scientists. This image, taken early the morning of July 11, 2015, shows newly-resolved linear features above the equatorial region that intersect, suggestive of polygonal shapes. This image was captured when the spacecraft was 2.5 million miles (4 million kilometers) from Pluto.

    Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI

    At 7:49 AM EDT on Tuesday, July 14 New Horizons will zip past Pluto at 30,800 miles per hour (49,600 kilometers per hour), with a suite of seven science instruments busily gathering data. The mission will complete the initial reconnaissance of the solar system with the first-ever look at the icy dwarf planet.

    Follow the path of the spacecraft in coming days in real time with a visualization of the actual trajectory data, using NASA’s online Eyes on Pluto.
     
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  26. Emma

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    ... “the last, best look that anyone will have of Pluto’s far side for decades to come.”


    There is no far side in the Pluto, really. Matter of fact, it's all far.
     
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  27. southlick

    southlick "Better Than You"
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    Pluto’s Time to Shine Just Hours Away – A Guide and Timetable
    by BOB KING on JULY 12, 2015
    [​IMG]
    Graphic showing New Horizons’ busy schedule before and during the flyby. Credit: NASA

    Countdown to discovery! Not since Voyager 2’s flyby of Neptune in 1989 have we flung a probe into the frozen outskirts of the Solar System. Speeding along at 30,800 miles per hour New Horizons will pierce the Pluto system like a smartly aimed arrow.

    [​IMG]
    Newest view of Pluto seen from New Horizons on July 11, 2015 shows a world that continues to grow more fascinating and look stranger every day. See annotated version below.
    Credits: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI

    [​IMG]
    For the first time on Pluto, this view reveals linear features that may be cliffs, as well as a circular feature that could be an impact crater. Rotating into view is the bright heart-shaped feature that will be seen in more detail during New Horizons’ closest approach on July 14. The annotated version includes a diagram indicating Pluto’s north pole, equator, and central meridian.
    Credits: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI

    Edging within 7,800 miles of its surface at 7:49 a.m. EDT, the spacecraft’s long-range telescopic camera will resolve features as small as 230 feet (70 meters). Fourteen minutes later, it will zip within 17,930 miles of Charon as well as image Pluto’s four smaller satellites — Hydra, Styx, Nix and Kerberos.

    [​IMG]
    This image shows New Horizons’ current position (3 p.m. EDT July 12) along its planned Pluto flyby trajectory. The green segment of the line shows where New Horizons has traveled; the red indicates the spacecraft’s future path. The Pluto system is tilted on end because the planet’s axis is tipped 123° to the plane of its orbit. Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI

    After zooming past, the craft will turn to photograph Pluto eclipsing the Sun as it looks for the faint glow of rings or dust sheets illuminated by backlight. At the same time, sunlight reflecting off Charon will faintly illuminate Pluto’s backside. What could be more romantic than Charonshine?

    Six other science instruments will build thermal maps of the Pluto-Charon pair, measure the composition of the surface and atmosphere and observe Pluto’s interaction with the solar wind. All of this will happen autopilot. It has to. There’s just no time to send a change instructions because of the nearly 9-hour lag in round-trip communications between Earth and probe.

    [​IMG]
    Instruments New Horizons will use to characterize Pluto are REX (atmospheric composition and temperature); PEPSSI (composition of plasma escaping Pluto’s atmosphere); SWAP (solar wind studies); LORRI (close up camera for mapping, geological data); Star Dust Counter (student experiment measuring space dust during the voyage); Ralph (visible and IR imager/spectrometer for surface composition and thermal maps) and Alice (composition of atmosphere and search for atmosphere around Charon). Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

    Want to go along for the ride? Download and install NASA’s interactive appEyes on Pluto and then click the launch button on the website. You’ll be shown several options including a live view and preview. Click preview and sit back to watch the next few days of the mission unfold before your eyes.

    [​IMG]
    American astronomer Clyde Tombaugh discovered Pluto in 1930 from Lowell Observatory. Tombaugh died in 1997, but an ounce of his ashes, affixed to the spacecraft in a 2-inch aluminum container. “Interned herein are remains of American Clyde W. Tombaugh, discoverer of Pluto and the solar system’s ‘third zone.’ Adelle and Muron’s boy, Patricia’s husband, Annette and Alden’s father, astronomer, teacher, punster, and friend: Clyde Tombaugh (1906-1997)”

    Like me, you’ve probably wondered how daylight on Pluto compares to that on Earth. From 3 billion miles away, the Sun’s too small to see as a disk with the naked eye but still wildly bright. With NASA’s Pluto Time, select your city on an interactive map and get the time of day when the two are equal. For my city, daylight on Pluto equals the gentle light of early evening twilight six minutes after sunset. An ideal time for walking, but step lightly. In Pluto’s gentle gravity, you only weigh 1/15 as much as on Earth.

    [​IMG]
    Pluto and its inclined orbit are highlighted among the hundreds of thousands of icy asteroids in the Kuiper Belt beyond Neptune. Credit: NASA

    New Horizons is the first mission to the Kuiper Belt, a gigantic zone of icy bodies and mysterious small objects orbiting beyond Neptune. This region also is known as the “third” zone of our solar system, beyond the inner rocky planets and outer gas giants. Pluto is its most famous member, though not necessarily the largest. Eris, first observed in 2003, is nearly identical in size. It’s estimated there are hundreds of thousands of icy asteroids larger than 61 miles (100 km) across along with a trillion comets in the Belt, which begins at 30 a.u. (30 times Earth’s distance from the Sun) and reaches to 55 a.u.

    [​IMG]
    During its fleeting flyby, New Horizons will slice across the Pluto system, turning this way and that to photograph and gather data on everything it can. Crucial occultations are shown that will be used to determine the structure and composition of Pluto’s (and possibly Charon’s) atmosphere. Sunlight reflected from Charon will also faintly illuminate Pluto’s backside. Credit: NASA with additions by the author

    Below you’ll find a schedule of events in Eastern Time. (Subtract one hour for Central, 2 hours for Mountain and 3 hours for Pacific). Keep in mind the probe will be busy shooting photos and gathering data during the flyby, so we’ll have to wait until Wednesday July 15 to see the the detailed close ups of Pluto and its moons. Even then, New Horizons’ recorders will be so jammed with data and images, it’ll take months to beam it all back to Earth.

    [​IMG]
    A new photo of Charon, too! Chasms, craters, and a dark north polar region are revealed in this image of Pluto’s largest moon taken by New Horizons on July 11, 2015. The annotated version includes a diagram showing Charon’s north pole, equator, and central meridian, with the features highlighted. The prominent crater is about 60 miles (96 km) across; the chasms appear to be geological faults.
    Credits: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI

    Fasten your seat belts — we’re in for an exciting ride.

    We’ll be reporting on results and sharing photos from the flyby here at Universe Today, but you’ll also want to check out NASA’s live coverage on NASA TV, its website and social media.

    Monday, July 13
    10:30 a.m. to noon – Media briefing on mission status and what to expect broadcast live on NASA TV

    Tuesday, July 14
    7:30 to 8 a.m. – Arrival at Pluto! Countdown program on NASA TV

    At approximately 7:49 a.m., New Horizons is scheduled to be as close as the spacecraft will get to Pluto, approximately 7,800 miles (12,500 km) above the surface, after a journey of more than 9 years and 3 billion miles. For much of the day, New Horizons will be out of communication with mission control as it gathers data about Pluto and its moons.

    The moment of closest approach will be marked during a live NASA TVbroadcast that includes a countdown and discussion of what’s expected next as New Horizons makes its way past Pluto and potentially dangerous debris.

    8 to 9 a.m. – Media briefing, image release on NASA TV

    Wednesday, July 15

    3 to 4 p.m. – Media Briefing: Seeing Pluto in a New Light; live on NASA TVand release of close-up images of Pluto’s surface and moons, along with initial science team reactions.

    We’ll have the latest Pluto photos for you, but you can also check these excellent sites:

    * Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) archive
    * Pluto Photojournal
    * New Horizons science photo gallery

    Need more Pluto? Spend a few minutes watching this excellent New York Times mission documentary.
     
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  28. southlick

    southlick "Better Than You"
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    #179 southlick, Jul 14, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2015
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  29. je ne suis pas ici

    je ne suis pas ici Well-Known Member
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    Jesus we gonna have some awesome pics
     
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  30. southlick

    southlick "Better Than You"
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  31. derfish

    derfish Well-Known Member
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    Pretty sure absolutely everyone who cares enough about Pluto to read this article knows how to convert Eastern Time to that of their time zone.
     
  32. War Grundle

    War Grundle Nole Mercy
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    Blows my mind the thing we are using was finished being built nine years ago and it has worked to perfection to this point. Imagine what we're building and capable of doing now.
     
  33. Heavy Mental

    Heavy Mental Heir of Aenarion
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    "We have completed the initial reconnaissance of the Solar System, an endeavour started under President Kennedy more than 50 years ago and continuing to today under President Obama," said the mission's chief scientist Alan Stern.

    Truly an amazing day for space exploration. Congrats, NASA.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-33524589
     
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  34. fsugrad99

    fsugrad99 I'm the victim here
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    NASA buzzing Pluto like Maverick buzzed the tower
     
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  35. prerecordedlive

    prerecordedlive Matthew Gertz is my real Congressman
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    Opportunity is still functioning on Mars 11 years after its designated lifespan was supposed to lapse. Given, it's only gone about 27 miles but that's fucking impressive.
     
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  36. LeVar Burton

    LeVar Burton Knee deep in a dynasty, ROLL TIDE!
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  37. Xander Crews

    Xander Crews The bones are their money, so are the worms
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    it's archaic technology now but the fact that the Voyagers are still going strong blows my mind.
     
  38. brahmanknight

    brahmanknight MC OG, UCF Knights, bacon, vodka, white wemminz
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    mind=blown
     
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  39. WhiskeyDelta

    WhiskeyDelta Formerly MK3rds
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    Isn't there a Star Trek movie about this?
     
  40. Heavy Mental

    Heavy Mental Heir of Aenarion
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    Yep - V'Ger comes back.
     
  41. lhprop1

    lhprop1 Fullsterkur
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    Wernher von Braun would beg to differ. Did we just completely the Sputnik vs Explorer race?
     
    #192 lhprop1, Jul 14, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2015
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  42. brahmanknight

    brahmanknight MC OG, UCF Knights, bacon, vodka, white wemminz
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    To be fair, Eisenhower wasn't exactly enthusiastic about space exploration. JFK was, if only as a political move to distance himself from David D ( JFK didn't actually care about going to the moon, either....it was a political response to the Soviets )>
     
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  43. brahmanknight

    brahmanknight MC OG, UCF Knights, bacon, vodka, white wemminz
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    No Jules Verne mention?
     
  44. Larry Sura

    Larry Sura Tuyuq. Fratzy
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    http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20150712-should-we-build-a-village-on-the-moon

    Why aren't we already doing this?


     
  45. lhprop1

    lhprop1 Fullsterkur
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    He didn't build an R7 or Jupiter rocket and send shit into space.

    To be fair, we owe most of our original missile technology to the Nazis. I suppose that's one checkmark in a pretty bleak "good" column.
     
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  46. brahmanknight

    brahmanknight MC OG, UCF Knights, bacon, vodka, white wemminz
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  47. Fidelio

    Fidelio meet me at the corner of my mind
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    we need ISIS to go to space
     
  48. Merica

    Merica Devine pls stop pointing out my demise. :(
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    We need a good old fashioned space race.
     
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  49. brahmanknight

    brahmanknight MC OG, UCF Knights, bacon, vodka, white wemminz
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    Wait til China is about to launch their manned mission to the moon. That's when we ( the West ) will get serious about that stuff, and not a minute sooner than that.
     
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