The Left: Robespierre did nothing wrong

Discussion in 'The Mainboard' started by bricktop, Jan 17, 2017.

  1. dtx

    dtx ruthkanda forever
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  2. steamengine

    steamengine I don’t want to press one for English!
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    She sucks so much
     
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  3. dtx

    dtx ruthkanda forever
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    the person who tweeted it to the contents of the tweet all made me want to fucking puke

     
  4. CaneKnight

    CaneKnight Well-Known Member
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    Respected Republican.... Funniest joke I've heard in a while

    [​IMG]
     
  5. dtx

    dtx ruthkanda forever
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  6. dtx

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  7. Prospector

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    The white backlash has begun. Again.


    [​IMG]
    As surely as night follows day, any flex of political power by Black and brown people in the United States will be followed by a reactionary white supremacist show of force. The pattern of racist white backlash to the barest hint of racial progress has persisted since the earliest days of the republic up until now, from antebellum white mobs attacking free Black people essentially just for existing, to the Civil War itself and post-Reconstruction violence punishing Black self-determination in Tulsa, to the violent resistance to the civil rights movement and then the enraged, panicked genesis of the Tea Party and the Trump era immediately after the election of the first Black president. Against that historical backdrop, the white insurrectionist takeover of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 was as predictable as a pendulum’s swing.
    After all, the purpose of Congress’s session was to ratify the results of the 2020 election, where the political power and organizing genius of BIPOC not only issued an unmistakable electoral rebuke of white supremacy’s latest avatar in Donald Trump, but also delivered the first Black and South Asian woman in history to the office of the vice president. The day also came directly on the heels of the Georgia Senate seat runoffs, where the power of Black voters—largely organized by Black women leaders—elected the state’s first Black and first Jewish senators, wresting control of a southern state and the Senate itself from Republicans’ grip in the process. Notably, both the outcomes in the general election and the runoff came despite concerted efforts to suppress Black and brown voting power. For those committed to the conception of America as a white ethnostate, then, those victories represent a special danger because they highlight both the reality that solidly “red” states have only been such because of voter suppression, and the fact that such suppression can be out-organized, out-strategized, out-voted, and overcome. Anyone who believed the white supremacists Trump and the Republican Party have been coddling and cultivating would peaceably accept any of that has not been paying attention.

    And however today’s news stories and tomorrow’s history books may try to whitewash the motivations animating this insurrection—credulously accepting the mob and their sympathizers' appeals to disproven “voter fraud” or “election irregularities”—this was not about anything other than white people lashing out and trying to regain control of a nation they believe is theirs and theirs alone. The symbols of the day, which the insurrectionists self-consciously brandished as they illegally forced their way into the center of the federal government, speak for themselves: A noose hanging from a wooden beam on Capitol grounds. The Confederate battle flag hoisted in the Capitol building. A white man covered in tattoos of white supremacist symbols standing smugly on the balcony of the Senate chamber.

    So, what now? Historically, too often the U.S. government response to violent white backlash has been reconciliation and retreat: Don’t punish the Confederate rebels too much, and abandon Reconstruction; keep welcoming segregationists into polite society and public life and avoid spooking them by shunning as “leftist” any public policy that would benefit Black and brown people. That absence of consequences continues to the present day. Just last year an armed right-wing mob entered the Michigan statehouse and was similarly met with little resistance and virtually no repercussions afterward. It’s hard to imagine that the mob who stormed the Capitol didn’t witness the Michigan episode and absorb the unmistakable lesson of white impunity. And at the Capitol, they saw their impunity confirmed as police stood aside while the insurrectionists broke into a federal building and arrested virtually no one afterward, a stark contrast to the way Black demonstrators have been treated in recent months. Beyond that, it remains to be seen whether Congress will take any coordinated steps to hold the culpable leaders—Trump, Sen. Josh Hawley, Sen. Ted Cruz, and other Republicans—accountable and strip them of power so they can’t continue to endanger people.

    Dressed up as a noble desire to move forward and forgive, these constant failures to hold lawless white supremacists accountable only leave BIPOC unprotected and send the message that perpetually escalating attacks on multiracial democracy have no consequences. While white supremacist backlash to growing Black and brown political power may not be wholly preventable, the way the nation chooses to respond to that backlash can neutralize its ability to harm BIPOC as we continue to rightfully and forcefully assert our full personhood in this country. Those in power have a responsibility to act with that aim in mind.

    Ashton Lattimore is the editor-in-chief of Prism. Follow her on Twitter @ashtonlattimore.

    Prism is a BIPOC-led nonprofit news outlet that centers the people, places and issues currently underreported by our national media. Through our original reporting, analysis, and commentary, we challenge dominant, toxic narratives perpetuated by the mainstream press and work to build a full and accurate record of what’s happening in our democracy. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.
     
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  8. dtx

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  9. Pile Driving Miss Daisy

    Pile Driving Miss Daisy It angries up the blood
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    Extremely strong lib boomer "why don't you millennials write letters anymore!" energy. You missed this gem though,

     
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  10. Baron

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  11. Prospector

    Prospector I am not a new member
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    For Official Use Only
    Survey ID : 17346766
    Certified Website of Republican National Headquarters
    Official 2021 Republican Platform Survey
    1. Which do you identify as?
      • Republican
      • Socialist
    2. What age category applies to you?
      • 18-25
      • 26-35
      • 36-50
      • 51-65
      • 66+
    3. What are your views on the Republican Party?
      • Strongly approve
      • Somewhat approve
      • Somewhat disapprove
      • Strongly disapprove
    4. What are your views on the Democrat Party?
      • Strongly approve
      • Somewhat approve
      • Somewhat disapprove
      • Strongly disapprove
    5. How close do you think your views are to other voters in your community?
      • Very close
      • Somewhat close
      • Not close
      • No opinion
    6. What do you believe is the most important issue facing our country right now?
      • Immigration
      • The Economy
      • Rebuilding our military
      • Taking care of our veterans
      • National Security
      • Draining the Swamp
      • Lowering the cost of healthcare
      • Protecting the Second Amendment
      • ALL OF THE ABOVE
    7. From what media source do you regularly receive your political news? (check all that apply)
      • NBC/CBS/ABC Fox News One America News CNN/MSNBC Twitter Facebook Parler Candidate websites
      • Internet blogs
      • National magazines
      • Local Newspaper
      • Radio
      • Social Networks
      • Friends and family
      • Text messages
      • Other (explain)
    8. Who did you vote for in November?
      • President Trump
      • Joe Biden
      • Other
      • Did not vote
    9. Do you believe Republicans’ legislative agenda supports policies that represent your values?
      • Yes
      • No
    10. Do you agree that a big government socialist agenda would be terrible for America?
      • Yes
      • No
    11. Do you agree that the Green New Deal would be terrible for America?
      • Yes
      • No
    12. Do you agree that Big Tech Companies, such as Twitter, Facebook, and Youtube, should NOT be allowed to unfairly censor conservative voices?
      • Yes
      • No
    13. Do you agree that Big Tech Companies, such as Twitter, Facebook, and Youtube, are infringing on our First Amendment rights?
      • Yes
      • No
    14. Do you agree that our Nation’s borders are more secure now than ever before?
      • Yes
      • No
    15. Do you agree we must FINISH the Wall?
      • Yes
      • No
    16. Do you agree that illegal immigrants should NOT be allowed to vote in US Elections?
      • Yes
      • No
    17. Do you agree that American Citizens should be prioritized over illegal immigrants?
      • Yes
      • No
    18. Do you agree that convicted terrorists should NOT be allowed to vote in US Elections?
      • Yes
      • No
    19. Do you support the Second Amendment?
      • Yes
      • No
    20. Do you agree the Republican Party should continue to protect 2nd Amendment rights so that the Radical Democrats can’t take away guns from law-abiding citizens?
      • Yes
      • No
    21. Do you agree Republicans should work to stop Democrats from packing our Courts with Liberal Activists?
      • Yes
      • No
    22. Do you agree it’s critical we preserve tax cuts for hard-working Americans?
      • Yes
      • No
    23. Did you know that Democrats want to RAISE taxes?
      • Yes
      • No
    24. Do you agree it’s critical that Republicans work to continue bolstering our strong economy?
      • Yes
      • No
    25. Do you approve of the Republican Party’s efforts to stimulate the economy?
      • Yes
      • No
    26. Do you agree that we must protect our law enforcement from the Left, who wants to DEFUND the police?
      • Yes
      • No
    27. Do you agree that the Republican Party must always work to put America First?
      • Yes
      • No
    28. Do you believe Republicans can take back the Senate and the House in 2022?
      • Yes
      • No
     
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  12. BellottiBold

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    It's just amazing that there are people out there who believe the intent of something like that is actually to see how you feel about things rather than manipulate you into particular opinions.
     
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  13. dtx

    dtx ruthkanda forever
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  14. Name P. Redacted

    Name P. Redacted I have no money and I'm also gay
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  15. JGator1

    JGator1 I'm the Michael Jordan of the industry
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    Definitely not a grifter

     
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  16. Prospector

    Prospector I am not a new member
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    My shitpit government actually trying to keep us uneducated and backward
    Legislators want restrictions on teaching social justice, diversity
    by Marine Glisovic ([email protected]) 13 hours ago 594 views


    A bill to ban public schools from teaching or promoting division or social justice for certain groups of people is already causing controversy in the 93rd General Assembly. The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Mark Lowery, R-Maumelle, said the measure is necessary, while opponents call it un-American.

    HB 1218 would prohibit certain classroom instruction in all Arkansas public schools including two-year colleges and four-year universities. Sens. Mark Johnson, R-Little Rock, and Gary Stubblefield, R-Branch, are co-sponsors of the legislation.

    According to the language in the bill, “a public school shall not include in its program of instruction a course, class, event, or activity” promoting the overthrow of the U.S. government or promoting division between or social justice for certain groups of people – including race, gender, political affiliation, social class. If schools are found to be in violation, and do not rectify it within 60 days of the initial violation, the state would withhold up to 10% of the school’s funding until they are in compliance.

    “The intention is – so that students, especially K-12 that are captive, are not subjected to humiliation in terms of trying to make a statement about whether there is inequality or inequity and that’s been happening in some of these programs using critical race theory,” said Lowery.

    He added, the inspiration behind the bill is a certain classroom activity he claims is being taught in some Arkansas schools.

    “One of the specific examples is what is called ‘the privilege walk’ – where all the students start in one line and a number of questions are asked,” said Lowery. “Do you have two parents, do you parents own their home, take steps forward and what it does then – it gives this definition of showing which students are supposedly privileged and which ones are not.”

    An opponent of the bill is Arkansas’ 2019 Teacher of the Year, Stacey McAdoo, who said educators within the community know what is best, not legislators.

    “To have individuals outside of those communities dictating what can be taught, what groups can be formed on your campus – again seems short-sighted, unconstitutional actually, and very ill-informed,” she said. “It [the classroom] should be a place where we help to foster creative and critical thinking skills and honestly that most frequently happens through discourse and examination of controversial and hard topics,” McAdoo said.

    “Part of the reason that you have African American history class or that you have a gender study class or that you have a multicultural festival is because you have marginalized groups that are not included in the mainstream curriculum and in the educational system,” she added. “So again, the only way and the only individuals that this bill would benefit would be a same gender, same race school.”

    Another opponent is Ali Noland, a Little Rock School Board member, who took to social media to express her concerns. Noland said she is not speaking on behalf of the board or district, but as a person in the community.

    “Arizona recently defeated such a proposal, and rightfully so,” she wrote. “Ask yourself, under this bill, could a history teacher still teach about the Civil Rights Movement? Could an economics class discuss the gender pay gap? How about civics teachers? Can they teach their students about the 14th Amendment?”

    “We can also say goodbye to the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, the Gay Straight Alliance, the Young Republicans, and the new Girls Who Code clubs. They too, could be seen as ‘promoting division,’” Noland’s post contends.

    “What we’re talking about allowing are historical perspectives,” said Lowery. “Those are factual, those are not theoretical. There are things that in theory we have to look forward, but when you’re looking backward, you have the record.”

    The bill does allow for Native American studies – required by federal law – to be offered. It also allows schools to teach the history of the Holocaust.

    Rep. Lowery and Sens. Johnson and Stubblefield have also filed HB 1231, which would prohibit the use of public school funds to teach the 1619 Project. The 1619 Project is a long-form journalism project developed by the New York Times that centers on slavery and its consequences for Black Americans during the colonial period of U.S. history.

    Editor’s note: Marine Glisovic is the senior political reporter for KATV.
     
  17. *DIESEL*

    *DIESEL* Half man, half amazing
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