TMB's True Crime Thread

Discussion in 'The Mainboard' started by 941Gator, Mar 24, 2019.

  1. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    The bad police thread is geared for police misconduct. I think there is a missing’s person thread too. Big/popular stories obviously deserve their own thread. This thread can be for random criminal cases and consolidation of any true crime content.
     
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  2. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    Podcast:

    Casefile (arguably the best one: https://casefilepodcast.com/ )

    Silk road

    Cold

    Court junkie

    Crimetown

    Liar city

    True crime garage

    True crime brewery

    Small town dicks

    Bear book

    The dropout

    The city

    Evidence locker

    Swindled

    The perfect scam

    To live and die in LA

    Root of Evil: The True Story of the Hodel Family and the Black Dahlia

    Over my dead body

    Generation why podcast

    In the Dark

    3 men and a mystery

    Happy Face

    Uncover: Escaping NXIVM

    Crime Junkie

    Dr. Death

    Broken Harts

    The Gateway

    Last podcast on the left

    Atlanta Monster

    Criminal

    Someone knows something

    West Cork

    Serial Podcast

    Up and Vanished

    S-town

    Sword and Scale


    [​IMG]
     
  3. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    i'll try to add some more over time....

    Documentaries:


    The Jinx

    I am evidence

    Paradise lost triology

    Dear Zachary

    The Keepers

    Evil Genius

    The staircase

    There’s something wrong with aunt diane

    Central Park Five

    Making Murderer

    Dream/kIller

    Seven five

    Into the abyss

    The imposter

    Thin blue line

    Unreal dream: Michael Morton story

    Murder in the park

    Killing season

    Abducted in plain sight

    3 ½ minutes 10 bullets

    Tales of the grim sleeper

    Murder on a Sunday morning

    The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann

    Cropsey

    Wild wild country

    Ted bundy tapes
     
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  4. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    Great doc on the Jessica Chambers murder in Mississippi:

     
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  5. Detlef Schrempf

    Detlef Schrempf Well-Known Member

    Haven’t listened to Silk Road, interesting?
     
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  6. Boo MFer!

    Boo MFer! UCF has a clown car of talent at RB and WR.
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    OP knows a little TOO much about some of these, if you catch my drift.
     
  7. Doc Louis

    Doc Louis Well-Known Member
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    Yeah and could've crammed it in one of the other crime threads on the board
     
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  8. TC

    TC Harvey Updyke: Eco-Terrorist
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    *nervous laughter*
     
  9. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    i remember enjoying it but didn't finish it. There is a bunch of content on silk road (and a few different stories called "silk road" actually).

    i just searched because I could of sworn we had a dumb criminals type of thread. But only found the police thread, disappearance thread, and then specific threads i.e. celebrities being arrested. so you're welcome.
     
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  10. Randy Dangus

    Randy Dangus Comanche Indian
    Nebraska Cornhuskers

    Multi-part series. I found it pretty informative and interesting. Feel like it framed the case very well, and the dudes eventual downfall and mentality at the time. Been quite a while since I listened but that’s my recollection.
     
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  11. Doc Louis

    Doc Louis Well-Known Member
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    Yeah I guess it wouldn't fit in one of the mafia threads
     
  12. Randy Dangus

    Randy Dangus Comanche Indian
    Nebraska Cornhuskers

    I appreciate it. Love true crime podcasts.

    For whatever reason, I’ve had a hard time watching crime documentaries, I think I just prefer the podcast medium.
     
    #13 Randy Dangus, Mar 24, 2019
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2019
  13. Irush

    Irush Fairwell Solenya
    Donor TMB OG

    This thread is very relevant to my interests
     
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  14. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    we also had a "mugshot" thread, but a lot of those websites/insta's stopped posting because they were being sued/threatened.



    Had the pleasure of speaking to this guy at one point. All 4 seasons are great:

    https://soundcloud.com/murderonthespacecoast

     
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  15. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    Up and Vanished podcast fans…. Bo Duke (not Ryan Dukes) found guilty. Some highlights of the trial:

     
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  16. NothingIsOT

    NothingIsOT I got you COACH!
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    I heard atlanta monster sucked

    up and vanished was good up until they actually broke the case; then it went downhill fast.
     
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  17. Detlef Schrempf

    Detlef Schrempf Well-Known Member

    Atlanta monster was terrible. Dude felt very clearly guilty.
     
  18. Henry Blake

    Henry Blake No Springsteen is leaving this house!

    Do any of those podcasts focus on forensics or criminology?
     
  19. devine

    devine Tmb’s resident bad boy
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    I don’t know that this fits in to “true crime” per say but everyone should give dope on Netflix a watch. It’s fascinating.
     
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  20. slogan119

    slogan119 Her?
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    I’m obsessed with the West Memphis Three. That case creeps into my brain at random times when I’m busy. I just can’t get past how it occurred, the strange shit going on that night, how awful the investigation was, and how corrupt the prosecutor/judge are in the case.
     
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  21. Nole0515

    Nole0515 Well-Known Member
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    this isnt the full doc know where I can find the rest?
     
  22. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    No, but lots of content via the Oxygen network, which has posts on YouTube if you search:
    Unspeakable Crime: The Killin g Of Jessica Chambers

    Crazy case. Girl is essentially burned alive. First responders get there and she says that "Eric did this" to her just before she dies. Police charge a guy named Quinton.
     
  23. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    If by criminology you mean study of why/how crimes occur, then probably not. You may like Root of Evil or Dr. Death.

    not to mention the question remains, who did it? Was Jessie involved? His liquor bottle under the bridge is an issue. Or Damien? Maybe Damien and others, and jason covered for him for 25 years.

    [​IMG]
     
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  24. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    A long handshake can spread your DNA to objects you didn’t touch

    BALTIMORE — A 10-second handshake could transfer a person’s DNA to an object that the person never touched.

    In handshaking experiments, people who never picked up a knife became the major source of DNA on the handle about 7 percent of the time, forensic scientist Cynthia Cale reported February 21 at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. That DNA was transferred to the knife when the person’s handshaking partner grasped the handle.

    In a separate study, the last person to touch an object such as a communal pitcher was often not the one who left the most DNA behind, Leann Rizor, a forensic anthropologist who did the work at the University of Indianapolis, reported at the meeting.

    The findings suggest that even brief contact with another person or object could spread DNA far and wide, which could complicate crime scene investigations. While the results don’t mean DNA evidence is unreliable, Rizor and Cale said, investigators should be careful to account for these accidental transfers.

    https://www.sciencenews.org/article/long-handshake-spread-your-dna-objects-you-didnt-touch
     
  25. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    great article on the technique of using DNA websites to solve old crimes. You just know there are so many guys out there holding on for dear life right now.


    Forensic genealogists at Parabon NanoLabs are using DNA databases to solve cold cases faster than anyone could have imagined. But how will their techniques hold up in court?
    https://www.topic.com/the-cold-case-factory
     
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  26. TC

    TC Harvey Updyke: Eco-Terrorist
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    "APRIL TINSLEY’S MURDER SHOULD HAVE been easy to solve. Three days after her April 1, 1988, disappearance, when the eight-year-old girl’s body was discovered in a ditch in Fort Wayne, Indiana, police were able to collect plenty of clues that could help identify the culprit. They found one of April’s shoes lying near her body, as well as a shopping bag containing a dildo."

    Lady can certainly craft a journalistic lead
     
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  27. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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  28. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    Man gets 50 years for raping neighbor, offering yard work to make up for it

    WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — A 20-year-old convicted of raping his neighbor and then offering to do work around her house to make it up to her is being sent to prison for 50 years.

    Jurors in West Palm Beach found Timothy Walding guilty of sexual battery, false imprisonment and armed burglary in October. On Monday a judge sentenced him to a mandatory minimum sentence of 50 years.

    Prosecutors say Walding broke into his 35-year-old neighbor’s house in October 2017 and sexually assaulted her for 90 minutes. She said she was tied up and threatened with a knife.

    The Sun Sentinel reports he offered to do landscaping or fix something around the house, which she declined. Prosecutors say he asked her not to tell what happened and they shook hands. When he left, she called 911.



    [​IMG]
     
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  29. Spike 80DF

    Spike 80DF Too Much Bama In Me
    Alabama Crimson Tide

    I haven't listened to it in a while but there's some good content here that should scratch that itch.
    https://wondery.com/shows/real-crime-profile/
     
  30. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    I still haven't thankfully heard anything about sexual battery with Jayme Closs

     
  31. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    Casey Anthony is alive and well and living in West Palm..


    [​IMG]
     
  32. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    pretty intense murder confession below..... #Rutgers Scarlet Knights posters may know of the case


    Police thought it was a suicide. Then a horror movie director handed over a secret recording.

    A passing Uber driver was the first to spot the abandoned Oldsmobile and sense that something was wrong. It was after midnight on Dec. 3, 2016, and the silver sedan was parked at the crest of the bridge that connects Belmar and Avon-by-the-Sea, N.J., two beachfront communities separated by the chilly Shark River that flows out into the Atlantic Ocean. There was no indication that the car had broken down before being deserted by its owner, and when police officers arrived, they found the keys still in the ignition.

    As police started looking for the missing driver, Michael Stern was becoming increasingly concerned that his 19-year-old daughter, Sarah, hadn’t answered any of his texts.

    “Sarah, where are you?” he wrote, according to the Asbury Park Press.

    “Sarah, are you up?”

    “Sarah, what’s going on?”

    At first, it looked like a suicide. Investigators quickly learned that the 1994 Oldsmobile belonged to Sarah Stern’s grandmother, and that the teenager hadn’t been seen or heard from since the previous afternoon. Coast Guard helicopters, rescue boats and dive teams searched the estuary but came up empty-handed, and the river’s fast-moving current made it more than likely that a falling body would have been swept out to sea. When officials questioned one of Stern’s oldest friends, the portrait that emerged was one of a troubled young woman desperate to get out of her small New Jersey town.

     
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  33. Detlef Schrempf

    Detlef Schrempf Well-Known Member

    It’s got to be really awkward to have her in your social group.
     
  34. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    at least when BamaNug hangs with Amanda Knox he assumes she is innocent.
     
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  35. Schadenfred

    Schadenfred Well-Known Member

    Really recommend watching the 3-hour police interview of Canadian serial killer Col. Russell Williams. It's gripping the whole way through. Probably the best interrogation you'll ever see. The detective is surgical while being completely laid-back and friendly. A complete 180 from the Reid technique commonly used by police in the USA.

    Included below is the CBC 1-hour news program, which is also solid.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell_Williams_(criminal)








    [​IMG]
     
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  36. dathalfnukkahd

    dathalfnukkahd dat nukka high definition
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    The Silk Road episodes on Casefile are pretty damn good
     
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  37. Schadenfred

    Schadenfred Well-Known Member

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  38. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    that certainly doesn’t hurt Adnan’s argument...

    [​IMG]
     
  39. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    damn, that dude was cold/crazy. Lol at spoiler.
     
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  40. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    not old DNA this time, old fingerprints....

    Florida man’s job application leads to his arrest in 1998 cold case murder

    A Florida man scored a new job in January, but he ended up behind bars two months later in connection with a 1998 cold case murder - thanks to his successful application.

    Todd Barket, 51, was arrested Wednesday on a first-degree murder charge after authorities linked his fingerprints to the murder of Sondra Better, Delray Beach police said. The 68-year-old woman was working at a consignment shop when she was stabbed and bludgeoned to death in August 1998, the Sun-Sentinel reported.

    “Our detectives worked years trying to find the killer in this case,” Acting Delray Beach Police Chief Javaro Sims said in a news conference Wednesday. “We had fingerprints, we had blood, we even had a possible description from a witness. But the person responsible for this heinous case seemed to just disappear.”

    But in January, Barket underwent a background check while applying for a job with a fire and water cleanup company. He submitted his fingerprints that match those taken from the 1998 crime scene and placed in a national database.

    Detectives and Florida Department of Law Enforcement agents then tracked him down and began monitoring him. Police later obtained Barket's DNA — through unclear methods — and it was matched on Tuesday with DNA from the crime scene.

    Barket was 29 years old at the time of the murder and matched the description witnesses gave after the slaying, the Sun-Sentinel reported. Police said he was able to elude authorities because he had no contact with law enforcement.

    “He has had no contact with law enforcement, getting arrested or anything,” Capt. John Crane-Baker said. “He had a minimal criminal history, mostly traffic citations. So he flew under the radar, even for 26 years before this occurred. It was quite surprising.”

    “It took us 20 years,” Sims said. “20 years is a long time to want and ask for justice for a loved one.”

     
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  41. TC

    TC Harvey Updyke: Eco-Terrorist
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    Why would you stab and bludgeon an old woman at a consignment shop
     
  42. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    Might have been a burglary or robbery gone wrong.
     
  43. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    Krasner is a very unique/progressive DA out of Philly, always making headlines. I'm sure #Philadelphia Eagles recognize the name..

    DA Larry Krasner pitched judges on ending Philly’s probation addiction. Will they go for it?

    On any given morning in Philadelphia’s Criminal Justice Center, an observer can wander into a courtroom and hear a judge remarking pointedly (sometimes, griping openly) about some new policy instituted by Larry Krasner, the defense-lawyer-turned-district-attorney who in 16 months in office has upended many practices of the city’s criminal-justice machinery.

    Into that fractious climate, Krasner has launched yet another norm-shattering proposal: a letter to all Common Pleas and Municipal Court judges asking them to give a break to people who’ve done well under probation or parole.

    Krasner — who on March 21 announced an internal policy to seek shorter terms of supervision going forward — asked the judges to work with him in looking back at those who are already on probation or parole, in order to consider closing out their cases early. In the letter, dated that same day and obtained by the Inquirer, he wrote that the DA is interested in supporting groups of petitions “consistent with each judge’s independently stated criteria. Obviously, each judge is free to participate or decline to participate.”

    While anyone on probation or parole can already petition for early termination, the DA is suggesting action on a larger scale.

    The letter seeks to reinforce Krasner’s point that Philadelphia is among the most supervised jurisdictions in the nation: more than 40,000 people, or one out of 22 adults, is monitored by the county probation and parole department. That supervision can last for years or decades, because state laws allow for some of the longest probation terms in the nation.

    Under his proposal, interested judges might set out criteria for terminations that could be conducted en masse without hearings. For example, some judges might allow terminations for those with three years on probation or parole without a violation; others might approve termination after two years for good candidates convicted of nonviolent offenses only.

    According to the letter, the DA envisions that the petitions would be filed by, or in collaboration with, the Defender Association of Philadelphia. A spokesperson for the Defender declined comment.

    In Krasner’s letter, he emphasized each judge’s discretion in any early termination decision: “We respect your independence — as should be clear from our demonstrated commitment after 15 months not to abuse the judiciary via the press and via other means, as was done at times in some prior [District Attorney’s Office] administrations."

    Krasner says he has received calls from a number of judges eager to participate.

    “We have received a lot of interest from many members of the judiciary, and the Defender and I are looking forward to a collaboration that will allow these judges to do what they want, according to their standards,” he said in an interview.

    Still, the judges receiving the letter did not, in all cases, feel their independence was being respected.

    Some felt the message contained a veiled threat to litigate the issue through the press.

    One person familiar with the conversations, who declined to be named because only court leadership is authorized to speak to the press, said an “emergency meeting” was called to discuss Krasner’s pitch. It’s not that judges are opposed to probation reform, the person added. “It’s about usurping judicial authority. Mr. Krasner wants to be the judge, the DA and the public defender all in one. This is out of his lane.”

    “Many judges wouldn’t even open the email," the person added. "They believe Krasner’s missive is ex parte.” The legal term refers to impermissible communication with a judge outside the presence of all parties to any given case. (Keir Bradford-Grey, the chief of the Defender Association, was copied on the letter.)

    Lauren Ouziel, a professor of law at Temple University, said the communique does not appear to represent such a violation.

    “In a functional system, the chief prosecutor does — and should — reach out to judges to discuss whether and how existing court processes and procedures might be altered, and why such changes might be a good idea,” she said. “That sort of reaching out to the bench is normally not considered a violation of the rule against ex parte communications, especially where the other main institutional player, the chief defender, is included in the conversation.”

    The administration of the First Judicial District declined to respond to questions about the proposal; instead, a spokesperson provided a statement:

    “Court leadership remains committed to working with our partners to effectuate criminal justice reform. And our individual judges will continue to make their decisions objectively in a thoughtful, judicially responsible manner, consistent with the rules and procedures to which the judiciary are bound.”

    https://www.philly.com/news/philly-da-larry-krasner-probation-criminal-justice-reform-20190401.html
     
  44. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    $4.4M to Arizona Man Wrongly Convicted of Murder — Twice
    $4.4M to Arizona Man Wrongly Convicted of Murder — Twice

    The city of Phoenix and Maricopa County have agreed to pay a total of $4.4 million to a man who was twice convicted for a murder he did not commit.

    Ray Krone, then a postal worker, was arrested for the 1991 killing of Kim Ancona, who was a bartender at a Phoenix lounge Krone frequented. His conviction, which came a year later, was based largely on the fact that his teeth were said to have matched bite marks found on the victim's body. Krone was sentenced to die for the crime, and then spent more than 10 years in prison, including two years on death row.

    However, Krone's conviction was overturned two years later on procedural grounds. At his second trial, Krone was again convicted. But because the judge in his second trial expressed doubt about his guilt, Krone was spared the death penalty, and instead sentenced to life in prison.

    In 2002, however, DNA tests proved that Krone could not have been the killer. The DNA found at the scene of the crime was instead linked to another man who was already in prison on other charges.

    Krone, then 48, was freed in 2002. He filed suit charging Phoenix police with a faulty investigation which focused only on him to the exclusion of other viable suspects. Krone's suit also alleged mental anguish as well as physical pain and suffering. While in prison, Krone was stabbed and suffered a broken arm and hepatitis C, according to the suit.

    The Phoenix City Council approved their portion of the settlement, which was $3 million. Maricopa County agreed to pay Krone $1.4 million five months earlier.

    "I'm just glad for it to be over," a relieved Krone said. "I hope I won't ever need lawyers again."

    https://www.prisonlegalnews.org/news/2015/jan/9/44m-arizona-man-wrongly-convicted-murder-twice/
     
  45. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    Those that followed "in the dark"

    Flowers v. Mississippi: An annotated transcript of oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court

     
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  46. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    was just reading about this.... Satanic Murder Hoax:

     
  47. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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  48. 941Gator

    941Gator TMB's resident beach bum
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    this woman is a beast...

    Susan Kuhnhausen’s husband hired a hitman to kill her. She overpowered the hitman. “Tell me who sent you & I will call a fucking ambulance!” she yelled. He didn’t reply & Susan strangled him to death.

    It was a brisk autumn afternoon in Portland, Oregon, on the 6th of September, 2006, when Susan Kuhnhausen was returning home from her job as a nurse in the emergency room of Providence Hospital. She stopped at the hairdresser and quipped to the stylist that she needed a new hair colour since she was going through a tough divorce. She arrived home at approximately 6:37PM and kicked off her shoes, ready to relax for the remainder of the evening. Out the corner of her eye, she saw a man emerging from the shadows of her bedroom. He was wielding a claw hammer and ran towards Susan, swinging the weapon wildly. The intruder smashed Susan across the head and face but miraculously, Susan was able to get the slight on the intruder after biting him. “If I died, I wanted it to be known that I fought to live,” she said. They fell to the floor, fighting over the claw hammer, when Susan managed to climb on top of him and pin him to the ground. She placed the intruder into a choke-hold and yelled: “Tell me who sent you and I will call a fucking ambulance!”1Susan got no answer. As the intruder attempted to throw Susan off, she strengthened her hold until he stopped moving. She had strangled him to death.

    Susan fled to a neighbour’s house and called 911. As Susan lay in the same emergency room where she had worked as a nurse for the past 30 years, she wondered if somehow her estranged husband, Michael Kuhnhausen, could have been involved in this attempt at her life. Michael and Susan were in the process of getting a divorce and according to the affidavit “her husband was distraught but that she was insisting on the divorce.”2 As news of the attack circulated in the media, Michael wrote a suicide note and purchased a gun. He didn’t contact his adult children for over a week before asking if they could help him check in to a psychiatric facility. When police eventually got a hold of him, he claimed he hadn’t contacted his estranged wife following the attack because he had learned that she survived. His behaviour was certainly peculiar and raised a few eyebrows.

    The man who had attacked Susan was identified as Edward Dalton Haffey and initially, police was believed that the man was quite simply a burglar who had targeted the wrong house. Susan scoffed at this theory because the man hadn’t attempted to steal anything or even ask her where her money was. He was hiding in the shadows, waiting for her to come home. He had targeted her. After an intense investigation, Susan’s suspicions were confirmed: Haffey had been hired as a hitman by Michael. According to an affidavit filed by the Multnomah County District’s Office, Haffey had once worked as a custodian under Michael at an adult video store. Haffey was addicted to crack and desperate enough for money that he would commit murder. In Haffey’s backpack, police had found a note which read: “Call Mike. Get Letter.” Michael was arrested and charged with criminal conspiracy to commit murder.

    Susan and Michael had split up in 2006 when Susan threw him out of their house because of his anger and anxiety issues. At first, Michael was seemingly desperate for reconciliation but Susan refused. That heartache then turned to revenge and Michael started searching for a hitman to take her out. Three people denied his proposal before he turned to Haffey. In the wake of the attack, Susan was hailed as a hero. She took this title with a pinch of salt: “How can you be a hero when you took someone’s life?” she said.3 Susan described herself as “a middle-aged woman in bad shape with bad knees.” However, in that terrifying moment, Susan “made a decision to live.”

    When Susan got the chance to face Michael at his trial, she said: “You were willing for me to share your small, miserable life until death we did part –the sooner the better, as it turned out.” At the end of her statement, she said: “I am damaged by what you have done to me. I am damaged. But I am not destroyed.” Michael Kuhnhausen pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit murder and was sentenced to 10 years in prison. After his sentencing, Susan sued her ex-husband for $1 million, stating she wanted to make sure he didn’t have enough money to hire another hitman to “finish off the job.” Susan didn’t have long to worry, though, because in 2014, Michael died in prison from natural causes. While Susan felt relief from the news, she said “I don’t mourn his passing. Instead I mourn the life he could have had, if only he could have opened his heart for those of us who cared about him.

    https://morbidology.com/susan-kuhnhausen-killed-the-hitman-sent-to-kill-her/
     
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  49. devine

    devine Tmb’s resident bad boy
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    Damn this is crazy